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Aspirate   Listen
noun
Aspirate  n.  
1.
A sound consisting of, or characterized by, a breath like the sound of h; the breathing h or a character representing such a sound; an aspirated sound.
2.
A mark of aspiration used in Greek; the asper, or rough breathing.
3.
An elementary sound produced by the breath alone; a surd, or nonvocal consonant; as, f, th in thin, etc.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Aspirate" Quotes from Famous Books



... required it is best first to use the sound of ae, as in far, for in this sound the quality of the human voice is heard in most perfection, and in uttering it the vocal organs are most flexible and most easily adapt themselves to change. It may be preceded by the aspirate h, or by some consonant, as may ...
— The Ontario Readers: The High School Reader, 1886 • Ministry of Education

... a Kanthunda village on the western side of a mountain called Phunze (the h being an aspirate only). Many villages are planted round its base, but in front, that is, westwards, we have plains, and there the villages are as numerous: mostly they are within half a mile of each other, and few are a mile from other hamlets. Each village has a clump of trees around it: this is partly ...
— The Last Journals of David Livingstone, in Central Africa, from 1865 to His Death, Volume I (of 2), 1866-1868 • David Livingstone

... are Higuey, Guanama, Reyre, Xagua, Aramana, Arabo, Hazoa, Macorix, Caicoa, Guiagua, Baguanimabo, and the rugged mountains of Haiti. Let us remark in this connection that there are no aspirates pronounced in Hispaniola, as amongst the Latin peoples. In the first place, in all their words the aspirate produces the effect of a consonant, and is more prolonged than the consonant f, amongst us. Nor is it pronounced by pressing the under lip against the upper teeth. On the contrary the mouth is opened wide, ha, he, hi, ho, hu. I know that the Jews and the Arabs pronounce their ...
— De Orbe Novo, Volume 1 (of 2) - The Eight Decades of Peter Martyr D'Anghera • Trans. by Francis Augustus MacNutt

... advocated by Garcia in most of his published works, although the testimony of many of his pupils, notably Mme. Marchesi, is that Garcia used the glottic stroke very little in actual instruction.) Second, the aspirate (h as in have), which is generally condemned. Third, the approximation of the vocal cords at the precise instant the breath blast strikes them. This latter mode of attack is advocated by Browne and Behnke, who ...
— The Psychology of Singing - A Rational Method of Voice Culture Based on a Scientific Analysis of All Systems, Ancient and Modern • David C. Taylor

... that of town is found in the name of the town of Thebes, which was bestowed from the character of its situation rather than from the name of its founder: for in the ancient language, and among the Aeolians who had their origin in Boeotia, a small hill is called tebas without the aspirate; and in the Sabine country, where Pelasgians from Greece settled, they still have the same locution: witness that hill called Tebae which stands in the Sabine country on the via Salaria not far from the mile stone of Reate. At first agriculture was conducted on so small a scale ...
— Roman Farm Management - The Treatises Of Cato And Varro • Marcus Porcius Cato

... the native peons about them, and, above all, no plantation where birds could be seen. They were typical English people of the lower middle class, who read no books and conversed, with considerable misuse of the aspirate, about nothing but their own and their neighbours' affairs. Physically Mr. Blake was a very big man, being six feet three in height and powerfully built. He had a round ruddy face, clean-shaved except for a pair of side-whiskers, and pale-blue shallow eyes. He was invariably dressed ...
— Far Away and Long Ago • W. H. Hudson

... — N. sound, noise, strain; accent, twang, intonation, tone; cadence; sonorousness &c. adj.; audibility; resonance &c. 408; voice &c. 580; aspirate; ideophone[obs3]; rough breathing. [Science, of sound] acoustics; phonics, phonetics, phonology, phonography[obs3]; diacoustics[obs3], diaphonics[obs3]; phonetism[obs3]. V. produce sound; sound, make a noise; give out sound, emit sound; resound &c. ...
— Roget's Thesaurus

... author's little holiday-book have appeared at some time or other in the D.T., and do not suffer any D.T.rioration by being bound up together in this shilling volume. It tells of a visit to Hayling, where he picked up health, strength, and an aspirate, when he went there ailing; he tells of Suffolk, where a branch of the Great Punchian Family is settled, known as The Suffolk Punches; he prattles of Honeymoon Land, where he met the man with seven wives, each of whom had a cat, and to each cat there was a kit, and to each wife a kit too, ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 103, September 3, 1892 • Various

... if all the verses were like the second, they might properly be placed merely in short lines, producing a not uncommon form: but the presence in all the others of one line—mostly the second in the verse" (stanza?)—"which flows continuously, with only an aspirate pause in the middle, like that before the short line in the Sapphio Adonic, while the fifth has at the middle pause no similarity of sound with any part beside, gives the versification an entirely different effect. We could wish the capacities of our noble language ...
— Edgar Allan Poe's Complete Poetical Works • Edgar Allan Poe

... which are generally in the primary form, when preceded by a lingual; as, a sheann duine old man. Nouns beginning with s followed by a mute consonant have no aspirated form, because s in that situation does not admit of the aspirate. In nouns beginning with l, n, r, a distinction is uniformly observed in pronouncing the initial consonant, corresponding precisely to the distinction of primary and {55} aspirated forms in nouns beginning with other consonants. This distinction has already been ...
— Elements of Gaelic Grammar • Alexander Stewart

... confounding the one with the other. But, in the first place, Himilco's report was certainly not written in Greek, but in Phoenician, and Avienus seems merely to have translated that report. Moreover, the word iepa begins with a very strong aspirate, equivalent to a consonant, while there are few vowels softer in any language than the first in Erin or Ierne. Heeren does not attempt such an explanation, but concedes that the Carthaginians, as well as the Phoenicians before them, called Ireland ...
— Irish Race in the Past and the Present • Aug. J. Thebaud

... please also to observe that there is not, to the best of my remembrance, one vowel gaping on another for want of a caesura in this whole poem. But where a vowel ends a word the next begins either with a consonant or what is its equivalent; for our w and h aspirate, and our diphthongs, are plainly such. The greatest latitude I take is in the letter y when it concludes a word and the first syllable of the next begins with a vowel. Neither need I have called this a latitude, which is only an explanation of this general rule—that ...
— Discourses on Satire and Epic Poetry • John Dryden

... squatting as if on the watch; and small as they are, low down in the hollows and far away, this wonderful silver moon reveals even their slightest gestures; for their white robes and black cloaks stand sharply out against the monotonous rose of the desert. At times they call to one another in a harsh, aspirate tongue, and then go off at a run, noiselessly, barefooted, with burnous flying, like moths in the night. They lie in wait for the parties of tourists who arrive from time to time. For the great symbols, during the hundreds ...
— Egypt (La Mort De Philae) • Pierre Loti

... aspirate, Fuddy-Duddy, the incapable terrapin, came to a dead halt, and before the vowel had died away up the ravine had folded up all his eight legs and lain down in the dusty road, regardless of the effect upon his derned skin. The queer little man slid off his seat to the ground ...
— Can Such Things Be? • Ambrose Bierce

... is put in immediate apposition with the s of the monks-. Hence the combination monkshood. At the letters s and h is the point of contact. Now the sound of s followed immediately by the sound of h is a true aspirate. But true aspirates are rare in the English language. Being of rare occurrence, the pronunciation of them is a matter of attention and effort; and this attention and effort create an accent which otherwise would be absent. Hence words like m['o]nks-h['o]od, ...
— A Handbook of the English Language • Robert Gordon Latham

... is low and pleasant to listen to. Her speech lacks variety and modulation; it runs in a sing-song when she is reading aloud; and when she speaks with fair degree of loudness, it hovers about two or three middle tones. Her voice has an aspirate quality; there seems always to be too much breath for the amount of tone. Some of her notes are musical and charming. When she is telling a child's story, or one with pathos in it, her voice runs into pretty slurs ...
— Story of My Life • Helen Keller

... Makkah, and many other words. This point deserves special notice, owing to Dr. Redhouse's letter, published in 'The Academy' of November 22 last, in which he denounces as 'a very common European error' the addition of the 'h' or 'final aspirate,' in the English transliteration of many Arabic words. Hence, as I read the eminent Orientalist's criticism, when that aspirate is not sounded in pronunciation he omits it, writing "F&amacron;tima," not Fatimah, lest, as I presume, the unwary reader may aspirate the 'h.' But in our Bibles we ...
— Supplemental Nights, Volume 5 • Richard F. Burton

... by the Spaniards with a strong aspirate, the x and j having the same force. The vowel d, the queen of letters, reigns supreme in Spain; it is a relic of the old Moorish language. Everyone knows that the Arabic abounds in d's, and perhaps the philologists are right in calling it the most ancient of ...
— The Memoires of Casanova, Complete • Jacques Casanova de Seingalt

... word is explained by Professor Knapp as the feminine of hinjiro, 'executioner,' from djandjir, 'a chain.' {0z4} But there is no such word as hinjero, and hinjiri is merely the English 'injury' with a superfluous aspirate. ...
— The Romany Rye - A Sequel to 'Lavengro' • George Borrow

... of Consonants? When an aspirate and subvocal comes together, it is necessary to change the sound of one or the other, to make the ...
— 1001 Questions and Answers on Orthography and Reading • B. A. Hathaway

... the South Pacific Islands, assume such a similarity in pronunciation (for we can have no other guide), as strongly marks one common original. Once more; we learn from Le Gobien, that the Marianne people call their chiefs Chamorris, or Chamoris. And by softening the aspirate Ch into T, and the harshness of r into l (of which the vocabularies of the different islands give us repeated instances), we have the Tamole of the Caroline Islands, and the Tamolao, or Tamaha, ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Volume 16 • Robert Kerr

... Insane.—Foreign bodies may be introduced voluntarily and in great numbers by the insane. Hysterical individuals may assert the presence of a foreign body, or may even volitionally swallow or aspirate objects. It is a mistake to do a bronchoscopy in order to cure by suggestion the delusion of foreign body presence. ...
— Bronchoscopy and Esophagoscopy - A Manual of Peroral Endoscopy and Laryngeal Surgery • Chevalier Jackson

... H., e.g., Cormos Hormuz; Camadi probably Hamadi; Caagiu probably Hochau; Cacianfu Hochangfu, and so on. This is perhaps attributable to Rusticiano's Tuscan ear. A true Pisan will absolutely contort his features in the intensity of his efforts to aspirate sufficiently the letter C. Filippo Villani, speaking of the famous Aguto (Sir J. Hawkwood), says his name in English was Kauchouvole. ...
— The Travels of Marco Polo Volume 1 • Marco Polo and Rustichello of Pisa

... above must be added the aspirate {h} and the affricatae (i.e. an explosive a homorganic spirant) {z} ...
— A Middle High German Primer - Third Edition • Joseph Wright

... old jugs were sold at curiosity shops in these days, and given by amateurs to artists. The inscription proves that, in the eighth to seventh centuries, at a time of very archaic characters (the Alpha is lying down on its side, the aspirate is an oblong with closed ends and a stroke across the middle, and the Iota is curved at each end), people could write with ease, and would put verse into writing. The general accomplishment of reading is taken ...
— Homer and His Age • Andrew Lang

... reprove you; refer the matter to your ears, they will sanction the usage. Why so? Because they will say that that sound is the most agreeable one to them; and an oration ought to consult that which gives pleasure to the ears. Moreover, I myself, as I knew that our ancestors spoke so as never to use an aspirate except before a vowel, used to speak in this way: pulcros, Cetegos, triumpos, Cartaginem; when at last, and after a long time, the truth was forced upon me by the admonition of my own ears, I yielded to the people the right of settling ...
— The Orations of Marcus Tullius Cicero, Volume 4 • Cicero

... to me that the Horiti of Alfred are undoubtedly the Croati, or Chrowati, of Pomerania, who still pronounce their name Horuati, the H supplying, as in numerous other instances, the place of the aspirate Ch. Nor does it seem unreasonable to presume that the Harudes of Caesar (De Bell. Gall. b. i. 31. 37. 51.) were also Croats; for they must have been a numerous and widely spread race, and are all called Charudes, [Greek: Aroudes]. The following passage from the Annales Fuldensis, ...
— Notes and Queries, Number 20, March 16, 1850 • Various

... I may observe that the plain called by the Greeks Esdraelon, as a corruption of Jezreel, is that named "Megiddo" in Old Testament Scripture. In the New Testament it bears the prefix of the Hebrew word Har (mountain) minus the aspirate, being written in Greek, and so becomes "Armageddon" in the ...
— Byeways in Palestine • James Finn

... of curing this defect is to cause the stammerer to repeat the word, which he finds difficult to speak, eight or ten times without the initial letter, in a strong voice, or with an aspirate before it, as arable, or harable; and at length to speak it very softly with the initial letter p, parable. This should be practised for weeks or months upon every word, which the stammerer hesitates in pronouncing. ...
— Zoonomia, Vol. II - Or, the Laws of Organic Life • Erasmus Darwin

... title, however, is sometimes pronounced "'Alligonians," by the more rigid, as a mark of respect to the old country. But innovation has been at work even here, for the majority of Her Majesty's subjects aspirate the letter H. Alas for innovation! who knows to what results this trifling error may lead? When Mirabeau went to the French court without buckles in his shoes, the barriers of etiquette were broken down, and the Swiss Guards ...
— Acadia - or, A Month with the Blue Noses • Frederic S. Cozzens

... but remember to read very distinctly; make proper pauses; fall your voice at a period, and begin the next sentence in rather a higher tone; aspirate the H, excepting in such words as hour, honour, heiress, and a few others where it is silent: and above all, avoid a monotonous manner of reading, for nothing can be more unpleasant to those ...
— A Week of Instruction and Amusement, • Mrs. Harley

... the noblest of names, and this poem throws a fresh lustre on it." Observing in this poem a misuse of the exclamation "Oh!" Landor remarked, "'Oh!' properly is an expression of grief or pain. 'O!' without the aspirate may express pleasure or hope." Current literature rarely makes any distinction between the two, and even ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 17, No. 104, June, 1866 • Various

... which means nothing more or less than "a temple"—strong evidence, surely—I was inclined to locate the Athene shrine at a spot called Ierate (marked also as Ieranto on some maps, and popularly pronounced Ghierate the Greek aspirate still surviving) which lies a mile or more eastwards of the Punta Campanella and faces south. "Hieron," I thought: that settles it. You may guess I was not a little proud of this discovery, particularly when it turned out that an ...
— Alone • Norman Douglas

... into the shadow by his son. As it is, James Mill lives in history as the man who insisted that his baby three years old should be taught the Greek alphabet. When five years old, this baby spoke with an Attic accent, and corrected his elders who dropped the aspirate. With unconscious irony John Stuart Mill wrote in his "Autobiography," "I learned no Latin until my eighth year, at which time, however, I was familiar with 'AEsop's Fables,' most of the 'Anabasis,' the 'Memorabilia' ...
— Little Journeys to the Homes of the Great, Vol. 13 - Little Journeys to the Homes of Great Lovers • Elbert Hubbard

... April 20th we were to take up the line of trenches held by the Sixteenth. The Germans still continued to shell Ypres, (which is pronounced Ep-r-r, E as in fee, two syllable r-r, the R sounded the Scotch way with a burr aspirate). ...
— The Red Watch - With the First Canadian Division in Flanders • J. A. Currie

... pity we can find no spelling to reproduce that combination of guttural and aspirate and the inimitable inflection of voice. It is so delightful that I ask him again, and again the answer comes with even more emphasis upon guttural and aspirate, and an added curve to ...
— Beyond the Marshes • Ralph Connor

... of a caza of the sandjak of Sert; Khizan, the name of a caza of the sandjak of Bitlis. Girzan-Kilzan would thus be the Roman province of Arzanene, Ardzn in Armenian, in which the initial g or h of the ancient name has been replaced in the process of time by a soft aspirate. Khubushkia or Khutushkia has been placed by Lenormant to the east of the Upper Zab, and south of Arapkha, and this identification has been approved by Schrader and also by Delitzsch; according to the passages that Schrader himself ...
— History Of Egypt, Chaldaea, Syria, Babylonia, and Assyria, Volume 7 (of 12) • G. Maspero

... tooth was expelled after a violent fit of coughing; the symptoms immediately ameliorated, and recovery was rapid thereafter. Aronsohn speaks of a child who was playing with a toy wind-instrument, and in his efforts to forcibly aspirate air through it, the child drew the detached reed into the respiratory passages, causing asphyxiation. At the autopsy the foreign body was found at the superior portion of the left bronchus. There are other cases in which, while sucking oranges or lemons, seeds have ...
— Anomalies and Curiosities of Medicine • George M. Gould

... (adv.). As long as tiel longe kiel. As many tiom. As much tiom. As many as tiom, kiom. As much as tiom, kiom. Asp aspido. Asparagus asparago. Aspect vidigxo. Aspect (phase) fazo. Aspen tremolo. Asperse kalumnii. Asphalte asfalto. Asphyxia asfiksio. Aspirate elspiri. Aspirant aspiranto. Aspiration (breathing) elspiro—ado. Aspiration (aim, intention) celo. Aspire celi. Ass azeno. Assail ataki. Assailant atakanto. Assassin mortiganto. Assault atako. Assay provo. Assemble kunveni, ...
— English-Esperanto Dictionary • John Charles O'Connor and Charles Frederic Hayes

... one doubtful exception[145]—Roman capitals, of a ruder, and hence perhaps later, type than those cut on the Cat-stane; but the letters MV in TVMVLO are tied together in exactly the same way on the two stones. The omission of the aspirate in (H)OC, as seen on the Cat-stane, is by no means rare. The so-called bilingual, or Latin and Ogham, inscribed stone at Llanfechan, Wales, has upon it the Latin legend TRENACATVS IC JACET FILIVS MAGLAGNI—the aspirate being wanting in the word HIC. It is ...
— Archaeological Essays, Vol. 1 • James Y. Simpson



Words linked to "Aspirate" :   breathe in, suck in, pronounce, enunciate, take away, enounce, aspirator, sound out, consonant, inhale, suck out, withdraw, remove



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