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verb
Bate  v. i.  To flutter as a hawk; to bait. (Obs.)






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Bate" Quotes from Famous Books



... of these noble refugees, is not only one of the heroic, the courageous, and the faithful,—Italy boasts many such,—but he is also one of the wise;—one of those who, disappointed in the outward results of their undertakings, can yet "bate no jot of heart and hope," but must "steer right onward "; for it was no superficial enthusiasm, no impatient energies, that impelled him, but an understanding of what must be the designs of Heaven with regard to man, ...
— At Home And Abroad - Or, Things And Thoughts In America and Europe • Margaret Fuller Ossoli

... that warn't the worst of it nayther," complained Garry in his humorous way. "Though the vain, silly ould crayture bate Banagher for flirtin'—an', indade, bates ivviry other of her sex, God bless 'em, that I've ivver clapt eyes on yet—that quare little Frenchy chap, her husband, he, the little sparrow, must neades git jallous, an' makes out it's all my fault, an', belave me, a nice ...
— The Ghost Ship - A Mystery of the Sea • John C. Hutcheson

... the tasks of life, and be not lost; To mingle, yet dwell apart; To be by roughest seas how rudely tossed, Yet bate no ...
— Poems with Power to Strengthen the Soul • Various

... can't wait beside! I've promised to visit by dinner-time Bagdat, and accept the prime Of the head-cook's pottage, all he's rich in, For having left in the caliph's kitchen, Of a nest of scorpions no surviver. With him I proved no bargain-driver, With you, don't think I'll bate a stiver! And folks who put me in a passion May find ...
— The Children's Garland from the Best Poets • Various

... "Nae kickin', Peter! Ye're bate," yelled one watchful supporter of Bob, as he noticed the former's booted foot come into violent ...
— The Underworld - The Story of Robert Sinclair, Miner • James C. Welsh

... nervously, "we must bate 'em. That Dootch pookah aint the fool he looks. Things is feelin' shaky, an' you mus' undo yer wits fer me an' set 'em a-warkin'. If the Dootchy kin hev a 'sosheashin, I kin, too. If he kin run in Poles an' Eyetalyans, I kin run in niggers ...
— Tin-Types Taken in the Streets of New York • Lemuel Ely Quigg

... thou doest force Our selues against our selues! and by that course Seem'st to erect great Trophies in our brests, By which thou tak'st away our easefull rests, Nurse to thy passions, making seeming-hate Fewell to loue, and iealousie the bate To catch proud hearts, fearefull suspition Being forerunner to thy passion! Who most doth loue, must seeme most to neglect it, For he that shews most loue, is least respected. What vertue is inioyd, thats not esteemd; But what meane good we want, thats highly deemd: Which is the cause that many ...
— Seven Minor Epics of the English Renaissance (1596-1624) • Dunstan Gale

... book away from me. Upon which I would get up, and go out to "do something useful;" and would come home an hour afterward, looking like a bit out of a battle picture, having tumbled through the roof of Farmer Bate's greenhouse and killed a cactus, though totally unable to explain how I came to be on the roof of Farmer Bate's greenhouse. They had much better have left me alone, lost in ...
— Dreams - From a volume entitled "Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow" • Jerome K. Jerome

... lugar en que antes se encontraba. Una vez acomodado en su nuevo escondite, espero el tiempo suficiente para que las corzas estuvieran ya dentro del rio, a fin de hacer el tiro mas seguro. Apenas empezo a escucharse ese ruido particular que produce el agua que se bate a golpes o se agita con violencia, Garces comenzo a levantarse poquito a poco y con las mayores precauciones, apoyandose en la tierra primero sobre la punta de los dedos, y despues con ...
— Legends, Tales and Poems • Gustavo Adolfo Becquer

... that he left all his friends in Ireland and came to this country alone. From his reply I learned that his mother died when he was only ten years old, and, also, that his father soon after married a second wife, who, to use Terry's own words, "bate him unmercifully." "It's a wonder," said he, "that iver I lived to grow up, at all, at all, wid all the batins I got from that cruel woman, and all the times she sint me to bed widout iver a bite uv supper, bad luck ...
— Stories and Sketches • Harriet S. Caswell

... how to answer. If she were to say "me," it would be only foolish, while if she called back, "I am Huldah Bate," her hearer would not know who Huldah Bate was. However, she had to say something, so she called back pleadingly, "I am a little girl, Huldah Bate, and please, ma'am, I'm starving, and—and please open the door. I can't hurt you, I am ...
— Dick and Brownie • Mabel Quiller-Couch

... may, Charley; but I am tould they go in for petticoat government, for the best man among them is a woman. If such be the case we are not worth much if we let them bate us." ...
— From Wealth to Poverty • Austin Potter

... return to it when he should have made what reparation was in his power to his own honour and to public feeling. In a letter of December 26, 1891, Lady Russell says: "Your poor country has risen victorious from many a worse fall, and will not be disheartened now, nor bate a jot ...
— Lady John Russell • Desmond MacCarthy and Agatha Russell

... out of your love, Tis foolish love, sir, sure, to pity him: Therefore, content your self; this is my mind: To do him good I will not bate a penny. ...
— Cromwell • William Shakespeare [Apocrypha]

... during this last fortnight of July 1914, when the crews, running back with the southerly breeze for Polpier, would note how the crop stood yellower in to-day's than in yesterday's sunrise, and speculate when Farmer Best or farmer Bate meant to start reaping. As for the fish, the boats had made small catches—dips among the straggling advance-guards of the great armies of pilchards surely drawing in from the Atlantic. "'Tis early days yet, hows'ever—time enough, my sons—plenty time!" promised Un' Benny Rowett, ...
— Nicky-Nan, Reservist • Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch (Q)

... be hest' be hind' re cede' be came' be set' be side' con crete' be have' ca det' be tide' com pete' be take' de fend' de rive' se crete' e late' de pend' re cite' con cede' per vade' re pel' re tire' con vene' for sake' at tend' re vile' im pede' a bate' con sent' re mise' re plete' cre ate' im pend' re vive' un seen' es tate' im pel' con nive' su preme' re late' com pel' ex ...
— McGuffey's Eclectic Spelling Book • W. H. McGuffey

... more the Squire was turning away in wrath, when he caught sight of Amabel's face at the window. He turned back, and, biting his lip, said, "I'll give you five pounds if you'll take it now, and go. If you beat me down again, I'll offer you four. I'll take off a pound for every bate you utter; and, when I speak, I mean what I say. Do you think I don't ...
— Jan of the Windmill • Juliana Horatia Ewing

... aboored, I tell ye! If ye shoot, you're a lot of damned rapscallions, an' I'll come up there an' bate the head off ye!" ...
— 'Firebrand' Trevison • Charles Alden Seltzer

... the Aubrey Home house-committee yesterday. Harriet Maline and Mrs. Percy Brown had a battle royal over the laying of the new water-pipes, and over my prostrate body, which still aches from the contest. I wish Harriet would resign. She is the only creature I have ever known, except the Bate's parrot and my present cook, who is perpetually out of temper. If she were not my husband's stepmother's niece, I am sure I could ...
— Americans and Others • Agnes Repplier

... and I hope for your own sake it'll be minded afore you grow up. It's not I will be lettin' you out, when your ma lift particular orders you wasn't to go if it rained. Just hear how the storm's batin' agin the windows. Your cousin won't expect you at all. Oh, bate your dolls as much as you like!" as Bessie made an angry rush toward them; "it won't hurt their feelin's much, I guess. There's Baby cryin'!" she added, suddenly, and hastened toward the room at the end of ...
— Harper's Young People, January 6, 1880 - An Illustrated Weekly • Various

... eggs, and cotton-seed butter, and even horse radish half turnip," added Mary. "Bate up the cream a little before you put it in your coffee, or it will be in lumps. Whin the cattle are on clover it raises ...
— At the Foot of the Rainbow • Gene Stratton-Porter

... nitrogen in nitro-explosives, especially nitro-cellulose and nitro-glycerine.—The figure (No. 44) shows the general arrangement of the apparatus. I am indebted for the following description of the method of working it to my friend, Mr William Bate, of Hayle. To fill the apparatus with the soda solution, the gas burette is put on the indiarubber stopper of basin W, and firmly clamped down. Then the taps A and C are opened, and B closed. When the burette is filled with soda solution half-way ...
— Nitro-Explosives: A Practical Treatise • P. Gerald Sanford

... oncinch thet saddle, an' then, Horatius Ezek'l, yo' an' David Golieth, taken the hoss to the barn an' see't he's hayed an' watered 'fore yo' come back. Microby Dandeline, yo' git a pot o' tea abilin' an' fry up a bate o' bacon, an' cut some bread, an' warm up the rest o' thet pone, an' yo', Lillian Russell, yo' finish dryin' them dishes an' set 'em back on the table. An' Abraham Lincoln Wirt, yo' fetch a pail o' water, an' wrinch out the worsh dish, an' set a piece o' soap by, an' a clean towel, ...
— The Gold Girl • James B. Hendryx

... superior smile Hunted by Sorrow's grisly train In lands remote, in toil and pain, With angel patience labor on, With the high port he wore erewhile, When, foremost of the youthful band, The prizes in all lists he won; Nor bate one jot of heart or hope, And, least of all, the loyal tie Which holds to home 'neath every sky, The joy and pride the pilgrim feels In hearts which round the hearth at home Keep pulse for ...
— Poems - Household Edition • Ralph Waldo Emerson

... book of Kings." She was so well acquainted with proverbs, that on being presented with a collection of English aphorisms, and told by the author that it contained them all, she answered, "Nay, where is 'Bate me ...
— History of English Humour, Vol. 1 (of 2) - With an Introduction upon Ancient Humour • Alfred Guy Kingan L'Estrange

... said Jock airily. "It was Andra Laidlaw. He called me ill names, so I yokit on him and bate him too, but I got my face gey sair bashed. The minister met me next day when I was a' blue and yellow, and, says he, 'John Laverlaw, what have ye been daein'? Ye're a bonny sicht for Christian een. How do ye think a face like yours will look between a pair o' wings in the ...
— The Half-Hearted • John Buchan

... England herself? I have but little hope that the propounders and framers of these innovations will desist from their insidious course; but I rely with confidence on the people of England, and I will not bate a jot of heart or life so long as the glorious principles and the immortal martyrs of the Reformation shall be held in reverence by the great mass of a nation, which look with contempt on the mummeries ...
— Lord John Russell • Stuart J. Reid

... he pleases, I shall not hinder him. 'Tis one Talbot, the finest gentleman he has seen this seven years; but the mischief on't is he has not above fifteen or sixteen hundred pound a year, though he swears he begins to think one might bate L500 a year for such a husband. I tell him I am glad to hear it; and if I was as much taken (as he) with Mr. Talbot, I should not be less gallant; but I doubted the first extremely. I have spleen ...
— The Love Letters of Dorothy Osborne to Sir William Temple, 1652-54 • Edward Abbott Parry

... an' forty-nine an' a half-bad luck to ye, Discobolus!" said Long Jack. "I'm murderin' meself to fill your pockuts. Slate ut for a bad catch. The Portugee has bate me." ...
— "Captains Courageous" • Rudyard Kipling

... the pigs, Ain't we mane to ourselves to be runnin' two rigs? Och! it made me heart ache when I paped through the cracks Of me shanty, lasht March, at yez shwingin' yer axe; An' a-bobbin' yer head an' a-shtompin' yer fate, Wid yer purty white hands jisht as red as a bate, A-shplittin' yer kindlin'-wood out in the shtorm, When one little shtove it would kape us ...
— The Book of Humorous Verse • Various

... our tongue; and even with that we bate ye—flog you hollow. You Scotchmen take so much time in givin' an answer that an Irishman could say his pattherin aves before you spake. You think first and spake aftherwards, and come out in sich a way that one would suppose ...
— Willy Reilly - The Works of William Carleton, Volume One • William Carleton

... command Their rank thoughts down, and with a stricter hand Than we have yet put forth; their trains must bate, ...
— Sejanus: His Fall • Ben Jonson

... soide of the hill is it, sor?" said Thomas through the bandages on his face. "Up the soide of the hill? Be the powers, I couldn't bate it on the level, let alone ...
— Toaster's Handbook - Jokes, Stories, and Quotations • Peggy Edmund & Harold W. Williams, compilers

... Year he bears, Doth he slick in the Mud? No, for one Month or Year, we grant, And very honestly too; He shall be counted Ancient Without so much ado. What you do grant, I'm very free To use now at my pleasure: Another Month, or Year, d' ye see I'll bate, as I have leasure; So Hair by Hair, from the Mare's Tail I'll pull, as well I may. So what is good, is quickly stale, Though Writ ...
— Magazine, or Animadversions on the English Spelling (1703) • G. W.

... "Not bate him yet? Is not there the paper that I am going to write the challenge on? and is not there the pen and the ink that I am going to write it with? and is not there yourself, John Turner, my hired servant, that's bound to take him the ...
— Lavengro - The Scholar, The Gypsy, The Priest • George Borrow

... McGill scrimmage weakens and breaks up. Their quarter seizes the ball, passes it low and swift to Bunch, who is off like the wind across the field, dodges through the quarters, knocks off Martin and Bate, and with The Don coming hard upon his flank, sets off for the 'Varsity line with only Pepper ...
— The Prospector - A Tale of the Crow's Nest Pass • Ralph Connor

... To outward view, of blemish or of spot, Bereft of light, their seeing have forgot; Nor to their idle orbs doth sight appear Of sun, or moon, or star, throughout the year, Or man, or woman. Yet I argue not Against Heaven's hand or will, nor bate a jot Of heart or hope, but still bear up and steer Right onward. What supports me, dost thou ask? The conscience, friend, to have lost them overplied In Liberty's defence, my noble task, Of which all Europe rings from side to side. This thought might lead me through the world's ...
— Initiation into Literature • Emile Faguet

... dropped; he had the look of those who bate breath and swarm their wits to catch a sound. At last he remembered that the summoning bell had been in his ears a long time back, without his having been sensible of any meaning in it. He started to and fro. The treasure he held declined to enter the breast-pocket ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... who owned him asked me a long price for him, and I left Erling to settle that. Afterwards I knew that the man was a known breeder of these horses, and that men thought me lucky to get the steed. I think the Dane managed to bate somewhat of the price, but very little, for it was a matter of taking or leaving ...
— A King's Comrade - A Story of Old Hereford • Charles Whistler

... decisively the Servant of Goodness, the Servant of God, than even now when doubting God's existence. "One circumstance I note," says he: "after all the nameless woe that Inquiry, which for me, what it is not always, was genuine Love of Truth, had wrought me! I nevertheless still loved Truth, and would bate no jot of my allegiance to her. 'Truth!' I cried, 'though the Heavens crush me for following her: no Falsehood! though a whole celestial Lubberland were the price of Apostasy.' In conduct it was the same. Had a divine Messenger from the clouds, or ...
— Sartor Resartus - The Life and Opinions of Herr Teufelsdrockh • Thomas Carlyle

... Sir Edwarde Warner, knight, Silvestre Leigh and Leonarde Bate, gentelmen, do require to purchase of the King's maiestie, by virtue of his graces Comyssion of sale of landes, the landes, tenements and heredytaments conteyned and specified in the particulers and rates hereunto annexed, being of such clere yerely value as in ...
— A History of Giggleswick School - From its Foundation 1499 to 1912 • Edward Allen Bell

... place of safety and of rest," replied the guide, "and to one that is nigh at hand; where we may lodge us, with little fear of Injuns, until such time as the waters shall bate a little, or the stars give us light to cross them at a place where are no evil Shawnees to oppose us. And then, friend as to slipping by these foolish creatures who make such bright fires on the public highway, truly, with little Peter's assistance, ...
— Nick of the Woods • Robert M. Bird

... leave thee. For thy sake; TOBACCO, I Would do any thing but die, And but seek to extend my days Long enough to sing thy praise. But, as she, who once hath been A king's consort, is a queen Ever after, nor will bate Any title of her state, Though a widow, or divorced, So I, from thy converse forced, The old name and style retain, A right Katherine of Spain; And a seat, too, 'mongst the joys Of the blest Tobacco ...
— The Humourous Poetry of the English Language • James Parton

... know, sir? He was a quiet, dacent man, sir; the same that Mr. Waring bate so cruel and made Jeffers kick and bate him too. I ...
— Waring's Peril • Charles King

... choppin' like a labourin' man? More be token, it's little o' that thim pair down at Daisy Burn does. I b'lieve they 'spect things to grow ov thimselves 'athout any cultivatin'. An' to see that poor young lady hillin' the corn herself—I felt as I'd like to bate both the captin an' his fine idle son—so I would, while I could stand ...
— Cedar Creek - From the Shanty to the Settlement • Elizabeth Hely Walshe

... gone on for more than months. We had begun to count the war by years. Did we bate one jot of heart or hope for that? No more than at the beginning. We continued to place the end of the struggle at sixty or ninety days, as the news came more or less favorable to the loyal cause. But despair of the Republic? Never. Not the ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 17, No. 104, June, 1866 • Various

... Hennessy. "They'se a team up in Wisconsin with a la-ad be th' name iv Jeremiah Riordan f'r cap'n, an' wan named Patsy O'Dea behind him. They come down here, an' bate th' la-ads fr'm th' Chicawgo Colledge down be ...
— The Wit and Humor of America, Volume VI. (of X.) • Various

... she expected. One attic room, bate almost as when it was built. No chimney or grate, no furniture except a box which served as both table and chair; and a heap of straw, with a blanket thrown over it. The only comfort about it was that ...
— Mistress and Maid • Dinah Craik (aka: Miss Mulock)

... streaks darted down. They were arrows. Two thudded into the gravel, one into the wood. Then something tugged at his shoulder. Another arrow! Suddenly the shaft was there in his sight, quivering in his flesh. It bit deep. With one wrench he tore it out and shook it aloft at the Sioux. "Oh bate yez dom' Sooz!" he yelled, in fierce defiance. The long screeching clamor of baffled rage and the scattering volley of rifle-shots kept up until the ...
— The U.P. Trail • Zane Grey

... bequests, is indebted for one of the finest libraries of books on natural history ever collected, was born in Argyle Street, London, on the 13th of February 1744. He was the only son of William Banks, of Revesby Abbey, Lincolnshire, by his wife Sarah, daughter of William Bate. Banks was first educated at Harrow and Eton, and proceeded afterwards to Christ Church, Oxford, which college he entered as a gentleman-commoner in 1760. In 1761 his father died, leaving him a large estate. He left the ...
— English Book Collectors • William Younger Fletcher

... nor'-wester, an' likes to revive owld memories by takin' a trip now an' then in the owld fashion. There's no road av coorse, but dogs ain't like horses; they don't have no need of roads, so that don't matter. I'll git owld Bogus, the Injin, to help. He an' I can bate the tracks wid our snowshoes, and the dogs 'ill follow kindly, an' so we'll all go down ...
— Wrecked but not Ruined • R.M. Ballantyne

... and to know that the sea is gaining upon you, and that, however great the speed with which fear wings your feet, your subtle hundred-handed enemy is intercepting you with its many deep inlets, and does not bate an instant's speed, or withhold itself a hair's-breadth for all your danger—is an awful thing to feel. And then to see that it has intercepted you is worst of all; it is a moment not to be forgotten. And all this was what Kenrick ...
— St. Winifred's - The World of School • Frederic W. Farrar

... full of hate, whom Turnus' great renown With bitter stings of envy thwart goaded for evermore; Lavish of wealth and fair of speech, but cold-hand in the war; Held for no unwise man of redes, a make-bate keen enow; The lordship of whose life, forsooth, from well-born dam did flow, 340 His father being of no account—upriseth now this man, And piles a grievous weight of words with all the wrath he can. "A matter ...
— The AEneids of Virgil - Done into English Verse • Virgil

... apparently of Batrachians. Throughout the enormous class of insects, as Kirby remarks, "the law is that the male shall seek the female." (18. Kirby and Spence, 'Introduction to Entomology,' vol. iii. 1826, p. 342.) Two good authorities, Mr. Blackwall and Mr. C. Spence Bate, tell me that the males of spiders and crustaceans are more active and more erratic in their habits than the females. When the organs of sense or locomotion are present in the one sex of insects and crustaceans and ...
— The Descent of Man and Selection in Relation to Sex • Charles Darwin

... plants, that I must) leave thee. For thy sake, TOBACCO, I Would do anything but die, And but seek to extend my days Long enough to sing thy praise. But, as she, who once hath been A king's consort, is a queen Ever after, nor will bate Any tittle of her state, Though a widow, or divorced, So I, from thy converse forced, The old name and style retain, A right Katherine of Spain; And a seat, too,'mongst the joys Of the blest Tobacco Boys; Where, though ...
— The Works of Charles Lamb in Four Volumes, Volume 4 • Charles Lamb

... knew that it was in you all along. I would not give a brass farthing for a lad who had not a spice of divil-ment in him. It shows that he has got his wits about him, and that when he steddys down he will be hard to bate." ...
— With Moore At Corunna • G. A. Henty

... I'm prood to see mysel'. For thirty year I was drunk every Monday nicht, and that often atweenwhiles that it fair bate me to tell when ae spree feenished and the next began! But it's three month since I've seen the thick end o' a tumbler. It's fac' ...
— Bog-Myrtle and Peat - Tales Chiefly Of Galloway Gathered From The Years 1889 To 1895 • S.R. Crockett

... client; "I sworn a goodish many on em as it be. I doan't think that air Snooks can bate un." ...
— The Humourous Story of Farmer Bumpkin's Lawsuit • Richard Harris

... them, as high as Haman! What think ye? They signal me to lie to—me that has the mails and a hundred thousand pounds in specie aboard; they fire a shot across my bows, and when I signal that I'll see them in hell before I bate a knot, why—you watched it yourselves—they struck me in the fo'castle, and there's two of my dead men below now; but they shall swing"—and he brought his fist upon the table with a mighty thud—"they shall swing, if there's only one rope ...
— The Iron Pirate - A Plain Tale of Strange Happenings on the Sea • Max Pemberton

... seen in Grange Lane before. Perhaps it was because the cold had become more severe, an ordinary and simple reason—or because Clarence Copperhead, who knew her, and in whose eyes it was important to bate no jot of her social pretensions, was here; and the furred jacket was beyond comparison with anything that had been seen for ages in Carlingford. The deep border of fur round the velvet, the warm waddings and paddings, the close fit up to the throat, ...
— Phoebe, Junior • Mrs [Margaret] Oliphant

... strange and troubled life were cleared away. Nor merely by these signs, for such deceive; But in my soul, in my proud, throbbing heart I felt within me coursed the blood of kings; And sooner will I drain it drop by drop Than bate one jot my ...
— The Works of Frederich Schiller in English • Frederich Schiller

... reading public, and the new competitor for public favor did not exhibit such superior ability as to attract any great attention or to diminish the subscription lists of its rivals. The Morning Herald had been started in 1780 by Parson Bate, who quarrelled with his colleagues of The Post. This journal, which is now the organ of mild and antiquated conservatism, was originally started upon liberal principles. Bate immediately ranged himself upon the side of the Prince of Wales and his party, and thus his fortunes ...
— Continental Monthly , Vol. 6, No. 1, July, 1864 - Devoted to Literature and National Policy. • Various

... this felon in's disgrace, I would not bate an inch (not Bolton's ace) To baite, deride, nay, ride ...
— Notes and Queries, Number 55, November 16, 1850 • Various

... struggle to cast it off was immediately noticeable. If Mrs. Browne, in plain despair, went off for a day's ride with Lord Deppingham, that gentleman's wife was sick with jealousy. If Lady Agnes strolled in the moonlit gardens with Mr. Browne, the former Miss Bate of Boston could scarcely control her emotions. They shed many tears of anguish over the faithlessness of husbands; tears of hatred over the viciousness of temptresses. Their quarrels were fierce, their upbraidings characteristic, but in the end they cried and ...
— The Man From Brodney's • George Barr McCutcheon

... visage, for though his hurt permitted him not either to sing or to speak, yet by good fortune he could write, having been instructed by the monks of Mont Majour, and being violently in love with the fair Sancie, he would bate no effort to win her. So though all the nine who had taken part in the passage-at-arms were eligible, there were but three competitors, for five had been so desperately wounded that they could not stand, and Alphonso ...
— Romance of Roman Villas - (The Renaissance) • Elizabeth W. (Elizbeth Williams) Champney

... arrogance To the slime-rooted and wind-shaken reed That shivers in the shallows. I who perched, An eagle on the topmost pinnacle Of the State's eminence, and harried thence All lesser fowl like sparrows!—I to hide Like a chased moor-hen in a marsh, and bate The breath that awed the world into a whisper, That would not shake a taper-flame or stir A flickering torch to flaring! "I do wonder His insolence can brook to be commanded Under COMINIUS." So the Roman said: SICINIUS VELUTUS, thou hadst reason. ...
— Punch, Or The London Charivari, VOL. 100. Feb. 28, 1891 • Various

... back parts, high breasts delicate, * And lissome form that sways with swimming gait She deftly hides love longing in her breast; * But I may never hide its ban and bate While hosts of followers her steps precede,[FN186] * Like pearls now necklaced and ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 2 • Richard F. Burton

... some share." Replied Sabbah, "O my lord, verily they to whom these herds belong be many in number; and among them are doughty horsemen and fighting footmen; and if we venture lives in this derring do we shall fall into danger great and neither of us will return safe from this bate; but we shall both be cut off by fate and leave our cousins desolate." Then Kanmakan laughed and knew that he was a coward; so he left him and rode down the rise, intent on rapine, with loud cries and chanting ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 3 • Richard F. Burton

... ice in a few minutes, in spite of the whiskey inside of him. I at last got him on shore, and covered him up with a blanket, but before long he was as stiff as an icicle, and though I shouted as loud as I could, and bate him with a big stick, I couldn't make him hear or feel. Ahone, ahone! och the whiskey! I'd rather that never a drop should pass my lips again, than to die as ...
— Taking Tales - Instructive and Entertaining Reading • W.H.G. Kingston

... nodded. "Ivery divil iv thim—Big Mack Cameron, Dannie Ross, Finlay Campbell—the redheaded one—the next I don't know, and yes! be dad! there's that blanked Yankee, Yankee Jim, they call him, an' bad luck till him. The divil will have to take the poker till him, for he'll bate him wid his fists, and so he will—and that big black divil is Black Hugh, the brother iv the boss Macdonald. He'll be up in the camp beyant, and a mighty lucky thing for you, ...
— The Man From Glengarry - A Tale Of The Ottawa • Ralph Connor

... respondid, battherin' the sides av the mysterious locomotive containin' the bloody an' rapacious soldiery av threacherous England wid nickel-plated Mauser bullets, ontil she hiccoughs indacintly, an' wid a bellow to bate St. Fin Barr's ...
— The Dop Doctor • Clotilde Inez Mary Graves

... Prince of old,* An Ishwara for one I nill, Th almighty everlasting Good who cannot bate th ...
— The Kasidah of Haji Abdu El-Yezdi • Richard F. Burton

... could induce the two old gentlemen to bate one inch from these sine qua non. It was agreed that application should be made to the Admiralty forthwith for my promotion; and when that desirable step was obtained, that then Emily should have the disposal of ...
— Frank Mildmay • Captain Frederick Marryat

... over him, till at last the new-comer made a regular outbreak by exclaiming, "Ah, tare-and-ouns, lave aff your balderdash, Mr. O'Reirdon, by the powdhers o' war it's enough, so it is, to make a dog bate his father, to hear you goin' an as if you war Curlumberus or Sir Crustyphiz Wran, when ivery one knows the divil a farther you iver war nor ketchin ...
— Stories of Comedy • Various

... overtook him in a manner impossible to evade. He was attacked by divers infirmities, but for some time made no outward sign of his suffering, until one day five physicians came and waited on him, as Dr. George Bate states in his ELENCHUS MOTUUM NUPERORUM. And one of them, feeling his pulse, declared his Highness suffered from an intermittent fever; hearing which "he looked pale, fell into a cold sweat, almost fainted away, and orders himself to be carried to bed." ...
— Royalty Restored - or, London under Charles II. • J. Fitzgerald Molloy

... whit, not a whit; I cannot spare them a jot—I cannot bate them an ace. Let them stay in their own barren mountains, and puff and swell, and hang their bonnets on the horns of the moon, if they have a mind; but what business have they to come where people wear breeches, ...
— Waverley • Sir Walter Scott

... procures me. Enough—Wait, one word about the 'too kind letters'—could not the same Montefiore understand that though he deserved not one of his thousand guineas, yet that he is in disgrace if they bate him of his next gift by merely ten? It is all too kind—but I shall feel the diminishing of the kindness, be very sure! Of that there is, however, not too alarming a sign in this dearest, because last of all—dearest letter of all—till the next! I looked yesterday over the 'Tragedy,' and think ...
— The Letters of Robert Browning and Elizabeth Barrett Barrett, Vol. 1 (of 2) 1845-1846 • Robert Browning and Elizabeth Barrett Barrett

... and uncertain, And can bate where it adored, Chase of glory wears the spirit, Fame not always follows merit, Goodness is its own reward. Be no longer weary, weary, From thine happy summit hurl'd; Be no longer weary, weary, Weary, ...
— The Modern Scottish Minstrel, Volumes I-VI. - The Songs of Scotland of the Past Half Century • Various

... un bate off a touch,(5) T' other's face beam'd wi' pleasure all through, An' he said, "Nay, tha hasn't taen mich, Bite agean, an' bite ...
— Yorkshire Dialect Poems • F.W. Moorman

... he wants to draw from our eyes, I can bate him there," observed Mike, when Kakaik had ceased; and he began one of those sad ditties descriptive of the death of some Irish heroine. Though the Indian could not understand the meaning, he appeared to be much affected, and it was some time ...
— Afar in the Forest • W.H.G. Kingston

... ioyfully receiued 20. miles distant from the towne by M. William Barret our Consull, accompanied with his people and Ianissaries, who fell sicke immediately and departed this life within 8. dayes after, and elected before his death M. Anthonie Bate Consul of our English nation in his place, who laudably supplied the same roome 3. yeeres. [Sidenote: Two voyages more made to Babylon.] In which meane time I made two voyages more vnto Babylon, and returned by the way aforesayd, ouer the deserts ...
— The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, - and Discoveries of The English Nation, Volume 10 - Asia, Part III • Richard Hakluyt

... choose to hear the news, Bedad I cannot pass it o'er: I'll tell you all about the Ball To the Naypaulase Ambassador. Begor! this fete all balls does bate At which I've worn a pump, and I Must here relate the splendthor ...
— Ballads • William Makepeace Thackeray

... de dulce se descojo buen mais bianco y se hace nistamal. Despues se lava muy bien de modo que no le quede nada cal y se muele en el metate muy remolido. Despues se bate la masa en un cajete bien batida y sepulsa en una puca de agua hasta el ver que esta bien alsado. Cuando la masa se sube sobre el agua ya esta de punto. Se le echa una poca de manteca y asucar y se eus pone adatro una poca de canela molida y pasas ...
— Favorite Dishes • Carrie V. Shuman

... me mate for charmin' an' delightin', Never one that had me bate for courtin' an' for fightin';— (A white moon at the crossroads then, and Denny with the fiddle; The parish round admirin', when I danced down the middle.) Up the earth and down again, me like you'd not discover; Arrah! for the times before me ...
— The Dreamers - And Other Poems • Theodosia Garrison

... Mrs. Potts how "th' insides were got in 'ithout tearin' th' outsides," and greatly satisfied with her new information, she clattered off down stairs, shaking her head all the while, and repeating absently to herself "Well now, there's nothin' can bate 'em, nothin' at all, ...
— Honor Edgeworth • Vera

... nother too scarce, ne too full. For by too much meat she waxeth ramaious or slow, and disdaineth to come to reclaim. And if the meat be too scarce then she faileth, and is feeble and unmighty to take her prey. Also the eyen of such birds should oft be seled and closed, or hid, that she bate not too oft from his hand that beareth her, when she seeth a bird that she desireth to take; and also her legs must be fastened with gesses, that she shall not fly freely to every bird. And they be borne on the left hand, that they ...
— Mediaeval Lore from Bartholomew Anglicus • Robert Steele

... over, for neither of them would bate a jot of this good old-fashioned privilege, Sir Ratcliffe and Lady Armine returned to the Place, and Glastonbury to his tower; while Mr. Temple joined them at Ducie, accompanied by Lord and Lady Montfort. The autumn also brought the Count Mirabel to slaughter the pheasants, gay, brilliant, careless, ...
— Henrietta Temple - A Love Story • Benjamin Disraeli

... it was me that had the doin' of it, I bet I 'd larn ye better manners, ye great, impudent good-for-nothin', if I had to bate ...
— Oscar - The Boy Who Had His Own Way • Walter Aimwell

... deserves well, not alone of the British army, but of the British nation. He has brought it about that the time has come when most men think with Sir Roger de Coverley. "You must know," says Sir Roger, "I never make use of anybody to row me that has not lost either a leg or an arm. I would rather bate him a few strokes of his oar than not employ an honest man that has been wounded in the Queen's service. If I was a lord or a bishop ... I would not put a fellow in my livery that had ...
— Camps, Quarters, and Casual Places • Archibald Forbes

... "Bate your aces, and catch your March hares," answered Mr Ive, who took all this banter very pleasantly; "but this is truth that I do tell you. An hour gone, we being in the church, when we heard that mighty bruit from the City, was Queen Mary proclaimed ...
— Robin Tremain - A Story of the Marian Persecution • Emily Sarah Holt

... Lester, 'you may beat me in faith, Vincent, but I will contend that I have beaten you in works. Had you waded, as we did, through those hideous bogs, which a poor Irishman, whose bones we left on the way, declared, 'bate all the bogs of Ireland!' you would have said the Israelites in the wilderness had a happy time of it, compared to us. Why, we were drowned, and starved, and frozen, till we had nearly given up all hope of ...
— The Old Bell Of Independence; Or, Philadelphia In 1776 • Henry C. Watson

... the stars in air Made me for His delight Lovesome and sprightly, kind and debonair, E'en here below to give each lofty spright Some inkling of that fair That still in heaven abideth in His sight; But erring men's unright, Ill knowing me, my worth Accepted not, nay, with dispraise did bate. ...
— The Decameron of Giovanni Boccaccio • Giovanni Boccaccio

... "I think that dog was nothing more or less than a downright cur, that deserved the lash nine times a day, if it was only for his want of respect to the clergy; if he had given me such insolence, I solemnly declare I would have bate the devil out of him with a hazel cudgel, if I failed to exorcise ...
— The Ned M'Keown Stories - Traits And Stories Of The Irish Peasantry, The Works of - William Carleton, Volume Three • William Carleton

... paper, a clear and truthful account of the affair just as it happened. That opinions will differ, is shown by the fact that Judge Young holds General Brown responsible for the Confederate failure, while I believe that Cheatham, Stewart and Bate were all greater sinners than Brown. He was acting under the eye of Cheatham, who could easily have forced an attack by Brown's Division if he had been equal ...
— The Battle of Spring Hill, Tennessee - read after the stated meeting held February 2d, 1907 • John K. Shellenberger

... tankard av shtout, Or a wee dhrap av whiskey, new out av the shtill;— And the shnakes that he saw—troth 'twas jist fit to kill! It was Mania Pototororum, bedad! Holy Mither av Moses! the divils he had! Thin to scare 'em away we surroonded his bed, Clapt on forty laches and blisthered his head, Bate all the tin pans and set up sich a howl, That the last fiery divil ran off, be me sowl! And we writ on his tombsthone, "He died av a shpell Caught av dhrinkin' cowld watther shtraight out av a well." Now don't yez be gravin' no more, Surrinder yer sighin' forlorn! ...
— The Wit of Women - Fourth Edition • Kate Sanborn

... and good, It's understood We'll let bygones go by— But if you choose To sulk in the blues I'll make the whole of you shake in your shoes. I'll storm your walls, And level your halls, In the winking of an eye! For I'm a peppery Potentate, Who's little inclined his claim to bate, To fit the wit of a bit of a chit, And thats the long and the short ...
— The Complete Plays of Gilbert and Sullivan - The 14 Gilbert And Sullivan Plays • William Schwenk Gilbert and Arthur Sullivan

... sound! ... We'll send him t' th' hospital, when we get settled down.... No' that they could dae mair than I've dune." Here a smile of worthy pride. "But a ship 's no' the place for scienteefic measures—stretchin', an' rubbin', an' that.... Oh, yes! Straight? I'll bate ye he walks as straight as a serjunt before we're ready ...
— The Brassbounder - A Tale of the Sea • David W. Bone

... but his books (not but he left her all he had) & those sold at a poore reat, and be kept out of so small a sume by a gentleman so well able to paye, if you will doe yr best for the widow will be varey good in you, which will oblige yr reall freund JAMES BATE. ...
— Life Of Johnson, Vol. 1 • Boswell

... now, if that doesn't bate everything!" exclaimed the amazed Irishman. "Just as I was thinking of raising my gun to give that spalpeen his walking-papers, up steps some gintleman and saves me the trouble; but who was the gintleman? is ...
— The Cave in the Mountain • Lieut. R. H. Jayne

... vessels, the admiral ordered an attack on Canton itself. The ships soon made a breach in the walls, when a body of seamen and marines under Captains Elliott and Stuart and Commanders Holland and Bate stormed the place, and in a short time the gallant Bate having scaled the walls at the head of one detachment, waved the British ensign on the top of the breach; the gate of the city was blown open, and in less than ...
— How Britannia Came to Rule the Waves - Updated to 1900 • W.H.G. Kingston

... prithee, Remember I have done thee worthy service; Told thee no lies, made no mistakings, serv'd Without or grudge or grumblings: thou didst promise To bate me a ...
— The Tempest • William Shakespeare [Craig, Oxford edition]

... she was the sort never to part from her word for no man. They kept company calm and contented, with no emotions much to either side, though now-and-a-gain William would venture to say he thought she might bate her terms and take him for ten shillings less. But this she weren't prepared to do; and so it stood when Mrs. Bird died and Milly, who had worshipped the dead woman, came to take her place till time had worked on Jonas and he was able to look round for another. For that his Sarah had ...
— The Torch and Other Tales • Eden Phillpotts

... day in dising skins and making them into various garments all are leather dressers and taylors. we see a great abundance of fish in the stream some of which we take to be trout but they will not bite at any bate we can offer them. the King fisher is common on the river since we have left the falls of the Missouri. we have not seen the summer duck since we left that place, nor do I beleive that it is an inhabitant of the Rocky mountains. the Duckanmallard were ...
— The Journals of Lewis and Clark • Meriwether Lewis et al

... RICHARDS, ALFRED BATE, journalist and author; turned from law to literature; author of a number of popular dramas, volumes of poems, essays, &c.; was the first editor of the Daily Telegraph, and afterwards of the Morning Advertiser; took an active interest ...
— The Nuttall Encyclopaedia - Being a Concise and Comprehensive Dictionary of General Knowledge • Edited by Rev. James Wood

... Joe Webster all he asks! What's the use of being a man of the world, unless one makes one's tradesmen bate a bit? Bargaining is ...
— Eugene Aram, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton



Words linked to "Bate" :   souse, drench, hold, dowse, beat, sop, hold in, soak



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