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verb
Bush  v. t.  To furnish with a bush, or lining; as, to bush a pivot hole.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Bush" Quotes from Famous Books



... him at the gray desert, above which the sun blazed mercilessly down with all the intensity of a burning glass. Here and there were isolated clumps of rank-odored mesquite, the dreariest looking gray-green bush imaginable. The scanty specimens of this variety of the vegetable life of the desert were interspersed here and there by groups of scraggly, prickly cacti. Across such country as this, the party had been making its way for the past day and ...
— The Border Boys Across the Frontier • Fremont B. Deering

... not go too near. There! I just saw the old bird fly out of the bush. Stand here, Rose. ...
— McGuffey's First Eclectic Reader, Revised Edition • William Holmes McGuffey

... wavering line, the brambles seemed to have been recently trodden down. A little farther on, almost hidden among the briers and dry leaves, lay a withered wild flower, like those that grew in the plain below; and farther still, caught upon a bush, was a bit of the fringe of a shawl, so small that it might have escaped any but his "hunter's eye." As he stood still, with senses alert, he heard a sound amid the brush; and, turning quickly, saw that which made him send forth the ringing halloo to his comrades. It was a little dog ...
— Apples, Ripe and Rosy, Sir • Mary Catherine Crowley

... the path leading from the barn, he stood near a lilac bush for a few moments watching the pretty group under the trees. But he couldn't understand having breakfast outside the usual ...
— Polly of Pebbly Pit • Lillian Elizabeth Roy

... intelligence which he ardently desired. He determined, therefore, by staying all night upon the island, to try whether the next day would not afford him a more distinct and comprehensive prospect. Accordingly, the gentlemen took up their lodging under the shelter of a bush, which grew upon the beach. Not many hours were devoted by them to sleep; for, at three in the morning, Mr. Cook mounted the hill a second time, but had the mortification of finding the weather much more hazy than ...
— Narrative of the Voyages Round The World, • A. Kippis

... pitch-dark, but George seemed to understand what he was about, and, for two hours, not a word was spoken, except, perhaps, now and then a growl of anger, as some one stumbled over a log or bush that lay in his way. Finally, the softness of the ground under their feet indicated that they were approaching a swamp. George ...
— Frank on a Gun-Boat • Harry Castlemon

... taken out of the day. I must go on alone till my journey shall draw towards its end." Then he spake the word, and a laurel came up on the bank where Daphne had plunged into the stream; and the green bush with its thick clustering leaves keeps her ...
— Museum of Antiquity - A Description of Ancient Life • L. W. Yaggy

... Chrismus, Joan Davies, Thomas Hethersall, William Douglas, Thomas Douthorn, Elizabeth Douthorn, Samuel Douthorn, a boy, Thomas, an Indian, John Hazard, Jone Hazard, Henry, Frances Mason, Michaell Wilcocks, William Querke, Mary Mason, Mandlin Wilcocks, Mr. Keth, minister, John Bush, John Cooper, Jonadab Illett, John Barnaby, John Seaward, 1195 Robest Newman, William Parker, Thomas Snapp, Clement ...
— Colonial Records of Virginia • Various

... I have something else to tell you, and not wholly good news; so I will just say it at once, without beating about the bush. You are ...
— The Child of the Dawn • Arthur Christopher Benson

... felt it a palpable substance. But going from it, his Heels were struck up, and he was laid with his Back on the Ground, sliding, as he thought, into a Pit; from whence he recover'd by taking hold on the Bush; altho' afterwards he could find no such Pit in the place. Having, after his Recovery, gone five or six Rod, he saw Susanna Martin standing on his Left-hand, as the Light had done before; but they changed no words with one another. He could ...
— The Wonders of the Invisible World • Cotton Mather

... I brooded over tales of terror, and fancied new and yet more frightful embodiments of horror, did I shudder at any imaginable spectacle, or tremble lest the fancy should become fact, and from behind the whin-bush or the elder-hedge should glide forth the tall swaying form of the Boneless. When alone in bed, I used to lie awake, and look out into the room, peopling it with the forms of all the persons who had died within ...
— The Portent & Other Stories • George MacDonald

... and down the nut bushes; but Nutkin gathered robin's pincushions off a briar bush, and stuck them ...
— The Tale of Squirrel Nutkin • Beatrix Potter

... towards Portree. It would have excited much suspicion, had any more important persons attended him. At an appointed place Charles threw off his female attire, and again "grasped the claymore." His clothes were concealed in a bush until they could be carried to Kingsburgh's house, where they were burnt upon the alarm of a search on the part of the military. The gown only was retained, by the express desire of Kingsburgh's daughter.[295] The Prince now ...
— Memoirs of the Jacobites of 1715 and 1745 - Volume III. • Mrs. Thomson

... a wonder of strange beauty with its masses of flowers. Judith brought some roses from the bush her playmate pointed out. She put them into a light bowl which was like a bubble of thin, clear glass and stood on the desk ...
— In the Closed Room • Frances Hodgson Burnett

... False to his promise the fox will prove, And fickle as snow in Wo-ka-da-wee, [37] That slips into brooks when the gray cloud lifts, Or the red sun looks through the ragged rifts. Mah-pi-ya Duta will listen to me There are fairer birds in the bush than she, And the fairest would gladly be Red Cloud's wife. Will the warrior sit like a girl bereft, When fairer and truer than she are left That love Red Cloud as they love their life? Mah-pi-ya Duta will listen ...
— Legends of the Northwest • Hanford Lennox Gordon

... been for this breakfast bringing Mrs. Rose into notice she would have been totally forgotten by them, but her invitation made them soon recollect the dear little creature, and as every offer of accommodation was made to entice them to attend, even to the promise of being placed near the Burning Bush: for that whatever is difficult to obtain is always peculiarly desirable to possess was not unknown in the hothouse. Notwithstanding that most of its inhabitants, except Lady Sensitive and a few others (who were really too delicate to venture out), all anxiously wished to be at Mrs. Rose's, yet ...
— Forgotten Tales of Long Ago • E. V. Lucas

... on their zeriba on the west and the Bengalese retreated on them from the east, the Billy Bagshot detachment of Berkshires rallying them and firing steadily, the enemy swarming after and stampeding the mules and camels. Over the low bush fence, over the unfinished sand-bag parapet at the southwest salient, spread the shrieking enemy like ants, stabbing and cutting. The Gardner guns, as Connor had said, were "fer the inimy," but the Lushai dandies were for the men that managed them that day; for the enemy came too soon—in shrieking ...
— The Judgment House • Gilbert Parker

... The "burning bush," which he describes is the experience of the mind when the illusion of sense has ceased, even temporarily, to obscure the ...
— Cosmic Consciousness • Ali Nomad

... not very heartily, and walked slowly to the house, leaving her bending over a rose-bush, and a shade more pensive than the most pensive garden ...
— The Magnificent Ambersons • Booth Tarkington

... station-keeper. Small cheer for a tired horse and rider! Haslam watered his steed and pounded ahead without rest or refreshment. Before he had covered half the distance to the next station, darkness was falling. The journey was enshrouded with danger. On every side were huge clumps of sage-bush which would offer excellent chances for savages to lie in ambush. The howling of wolves added to the dolefulness of the trip. And haunting him continuously was the thought of the ruined little station and the stiffened corpse behind him. But pony ...
— The Story of the Pony Express • Glenn D. Bradley

... food of the Lotophagi, must have been of infinitely larger size and in every way different from the lotus of the Nile, described in the 2nd book, as well as from the lotus in the East. Lindley records the conjecture that the article referred to by Herodotus was the nabk, the berry of the lote-bush (Zizyphus lotus), which the Arabs of Barbary still eat. ...
— Ceylon; an Account of the Island Physical, Historical, and • James Emerson Tennent

... little gray friar in yonder green bush, Clothed in sackcloth—a little gray friar, Like the druid of old in his temple—but hush! He's at vespers; you must ...
— Humour of the North • Lawrence J. Burpee

... few weeks later and started on their great inland journey. The way to Victoria Nyanza lay through what is now known as German East Africa. They reached Ugogo safely and turned to the north-west, entering an immense and silent bush-field, where no food was obtainable. On the eighth day five people died of starvation and the rest of the expedition was only saved by the purchase of some grain from a distant village. But four more died and twenty-eight miles under a hot sun prostrated one of the white men, who died ...
— A Book of Discovery - The History of the World's Exploration, From the Earliest - Times to the Finding of the South Pole • Margaret Bertha (M. B.) Synge

... old daughter of an English settler who lived some twelve miles from the point opposite to which the Georgette had gone ashore, was riding through the bush, accompanied by a native stockman, and coming out towards the edge of the cliff saw the steamer in distress, and witnessed the overturning of the small boat. Horrified at the position of the poor people on the upturned boat, she moved ...
— Noble Deeds of the World's Heroines • Henry Charles Moore

... Look here, you have been beating around the bush a long time. Exactly what do you want ...
— La-bas • J. K. Huysmans

... serang, said a few words. Whereupon Hossain made a trumpet of his hands, and, looking toward the left bank, sounded a few notes in imitation of a bird's warble. The shore was fringed here with low bushes. As if in answer to the call a small boat darted out from the shelter of a bush; a few strokes brought it alongside of the petala; and the serang, bending over, handed the folded paper to the boatman, and whispered a few words in his ear. The man pushed off, and the lascar watched the boat float silently ...
— In Clive's Command - A Story of the Fight for India • Herbert Strang

... upon one knee beside a bush near by, thrust her arms elbow-deep under the outer mantle of leaves, shaking the stems vigorously, and sending down a shower of sparkling drops. Never lived sane man, or madman, since time began, who, seeing her then, could or would have denied that ...
— The Guest of Quesnay • Booth Tarkington

... were six parcels, each tied with a bow of ribbon, so that all the rainbow shades are there. The friend is to draw one each day for a week. Mrs. Kittredge undid them and let me look. She says she likes the feel of the soft paper and ribbon. First was a little red rose bush ...
— The Wide Awake Girls in Winsted • Katharine Ellis Barrett

... the average home there comes the feeling that the kitchen—the room itself—is just as much an expression of the family life and aims and ideals as the living room or any other room, we shall be only beating about the bush in our endeavor to find a remedy for some of ...
— American Cookery - November, 1921 • Various

... relied-upon supporters of its enterprises. It was not a wealthy congregation. There were a few men of means; excepting possibly Claflin, Bowen, Sage, Hutchinson, Storrs, Arnold, Graves, Corning, Healy, Bush, Benedict, Dennis, there were no merchant princes or princely bankers. The greater number were earnest, aggressive men who had something to do in life besides make money. Generous whenever generosity was needed, they were for the most part ...
— Sixty years with Plymouth Church • Stephen M. Griswold

... glossy green leaves. I was delighted to find it still in flower. A hundred miles farther south I had seen it finishing its season a full month earlier. I stopped, of course, to pluck a blossom. At that moment a female redbird flew out of the bush. Her mate was beside her instantly, and a nameless something in their manner told me they were trying to keep a secret. The nest, built mainly of pine needles and other leaves, was in the middle of the bush, a foot or two from the grass, and contained ...
— A Florida Sketch-Book • Bradford Torrey

... of his own people: "I have scarcely ever seen anything like social intercourse between husband and wife, and it is remarkable that the women say little in the presence of the men." The Zulus regard their women with a haughty contempt. If a man were going to the bush to cut firewood with his wives, he and they would take different paths, and neither go nor return in company. If he were going to visit a neighbor and wished his wife to go also, she would follow at a distance. In Senegambia the women live by themselves, rarely with ...
— Sex and Society • William I. Thomas

... far from home, instead of going to America. As a whole the system worked satisfactorily; the men were as much prisoners as were the inmates of the jail, for they knew well enough that were they to leave the farmers and take to the bush they would remain free but a short time, being either killed or handed over by the blacks, and in the latter case they would be severely punished and set to prison work in irons, with labor very much more severe than that they were called upon to ...
— Colonel Thorndyke's Secret • G. A. Henty

... straightening up to start off with his load for a bush-screen near the lake front, Ripley heard that ominous growl. There was also the sound of something moving ...
— The High School Boys' Canoe Club • H. Irving Hancock

... might be out-of-doors all day under the shelter of the rocks, in the warm, southern nooks where the daisies were growing. The birds sang more blithely than they had ever done before; a lark overhead, flinging down his triumphant notes; a thrush whistling clearly in a hawthorn-bush hanging over the cliff; and the cry of the gulls flitting about the rocks; I could hear them all at the same moment, with the deep, quiet tone of the sea sounding below their gay music. Tardif was going out to fish, and ...
— The Doctor's Dilemma • Hesba Stretton

... after Will had been flunked out of college, he was standing on the lawn whittling. I happened to be looking out of the window. I saw Uncle Jim crawling across the grass under cover of a rhododendron bush to a position just behind Will. He was carrying under one arm an enormous fire-cracker, with the fuse lit. He rolled it out on the grass behind Will, and when it went off, Will went, too. He landed seventeen feet from the hole the ...
— Through stained glass • George Agnew Chamberlain

... an infamous, derisive Christ. The head had been raised and the neck lengthened, and wrinkles, painted in the cheeks, transformed the grieving face to a bestial one twisted into a mean laugh. He was naked, and where the loincloth should have been, there was a virile member projecting from a bush of horsehair. In front of the tabernacle the chalice, covered with a pall, was placed. The choir boy folded the altar cloth, wiggled his haunches, stood tiptoe on one foot and flipped his arms as ...
— La-bas • J. K. Huysmans

... his pointing finger. Near the glass window through which they looked grew an enormous bank of resplendent violet colored flowers, which literally enshrouded the entire bush with their royal glory. At first glance it seemed as though a violent wind were snatching at flower and bush, but closer inspection proved that the agitation was part of the plant itself. And then he saw that the movements were the result ...
— Astounding Stories of Super-Science February 1930 • Various

... Evening.—Encampment at Abugilbany. 30.—This was our last day in the Egyptian wilderness. We entered on a much more mountainous region. The heat very great; we literally panted for a breath of wind. The Bedouins begged handkerchiefs to cover their heads, and often cast themselves under a bush for shade. Towards sunset, we came down on the old ruins of Rhinoculura, now buried in the sand; and soon after our camels kneeled down at the gates of El Arish, the last town on the Egyptian frontier. 31.—We spent in El Arish, ...
— The Biography of Robert Murray M'Cheyne • Andrew A. Bonar

... been a great friend of the first Lord Lytton, the novelist, and they had together dabbled in Black Magic. Sir Charles declared that the last chapters in Bulwer-Lytton's wonderful imaginative work, A STRANGE STORY, describing the preparation of the Elixir of Life in the heart of the Australian Bush, were all founded on actual experience, with the notable reservation that all the recorded attempts made to produce this magic fluid had failed from their very start. He had in his younger days joined a society of Rosicrucians, by which I do not mean the Masonic Order of that name, but persons ...
— The Days Before Yesterday • Lord Frederick Hamilton

... it!" exclaimed the old man. "'Tain't no use o' beating round the bush no more. Levi done it, and he meant to ...
— Freaks of Fortune - or, Half Round the World • Oliver Optic

... of nine-tenths of the nation, to beg of you to ally your fate with ours, and to prevent our falling into other hands." Napoleon used even plainer language. He declared to his brother without beating the bush that he had accepted for him, and that, even if he had not consulted him, a subject ...
— The Court of the Empress Josephine • Imbert de Saint-Amand

... clear to Hawk-eye that they still lived, and had been carried off by Magua. With untiring energy he at once set off to try and discover the trail. It was Uncas, who, finding a portion of Cora's skirt caught on a bush, first opened up the line of pursuit. He it was, too, who read the track of Magua's feet on the ground—the unmistakable straddling toe of the drinking savage. An ornament dropped by Alice, and the large footprints of the singing-master, laid bare to the ...
— The Worlds Greatest Books - Vol. II: Fiction • Arthur Mee, J. A. Hammerton, Eds.

... he aloud, and lifted from him the spoils on high, and set them on a tamarisk bush, and raised thereon a mark right plain to see, gathering together reeds, and luxuriant shoots of tamarisk, lest they should miss the place as they returned again through the swift ...
— The Iliad of Homer • Homer (Lang, Leaf, Myers trans.)

... purely personal, and have been a continual struggle of this and that and the other man to secure ascendancy and power. She has come to us for help. She is burdened with an enormous amount of debt, much of it fraudulent, much of it created by revolutionary governments in the bush or by regular governments in distress, needing a little money to save themselves from being overthrown, in desperate circumstances, ready to make any sort of bargain, to pay any sort of interest, to promise anything to get immediate relief. ...
— Latin America and the United States - Addresses by Elihu Root • Elihu Root

... who, though he is but young, as he says, "has a pretty smattering gift in this pistle-making; and I fear, in a while, I shall take a pride in it." He had picked up beside a bush, where it had dropped from somebody, an ...
— Calamities and Quarrels of Authors • Isaac D'Israeli

... attended to the matter, sir," he replied. "I saw the reporter who wrote the article in question; and, after beating about the bush for some time, he finally confessed that he knew nothing more than had been published, and that he had obtained his information from two intimate friends of the cashier, M. Costeclar and ...
— Other People's Money • Emile Gaboriau

... back of the piston is in contact with the end of the slide valve bush, and, as these two surfaces are ground to an accurate fit, the piston makes a tight "seal" on the end of the bush except at one point, where a feed groove is cut in the piston to allow air to pass around the end of the slide valve bush into chamber "R" and the auxiliary reservoir. This feed ...
— The Traveling Engineers' Association - To Improve The Locomotive Engine Service of American Railroads • Anonymous

... Counterrolment, a counter account."—Ib. "Millenium, the thousand years during which Satan shall be bound."—Ib. "Millenial, pertaining to the millenium, or to a thousand years."—Ib. "Thraldom; slavery, bondage, a state of servitude."—See Johnson's Dict. "Brier, a prickly bush; Briery, rough, prickly, full of briers; Sweetbriar, a fragrant shrub."—See Johnson, Walker, Chalmers, Webster, and others. "Will, in the second and third Persons, barely foretels."—British Gram., p. 132. "And therefor there is no Word false, but what is ...
— The Grammar of English Grammars • Goold Brown

... heralding him is quite out of place unless he has, for the best reason and spirit of man, some significance. "Well, but," says Mr. Hepworth Dixon, [116] "a theory which has been accepted by men like Judge Edmonds, Dr. Hare, Elder Frederick, and Professor Bush!" And again: "Such are, in brief, the bases of what Newman Weeks, Sarah Horton, Deborah Butler, and the associated brethren, proclaimed in Rolt's Hall as the new covenant!" If he was summing up an account of the teaching ...
— Culture and Anarchy • Matthew Arnold

... not suffer her to say this twice, but, running after the ugly old hat, caught it just before it could disappear in one of the sand pits. She followed me, but unfortunately caught the train of her riding-habit in a bush, which tripped her, and caused her to fall with her beautiful locks of hair amongst the briers. At first she refused all assistance, but in the end she was obliged to let me disentangle her hair—a circumstance which annoyed her much ...
— Major Frank • A. L. G. Bosboom-Toussaint

... should earlier have that breath been That here personal tells off these heart-song powerful peals?— A bush-browed, beetle-browed billow is it? With a south-westerly wind blustering, with a tide rolls reels Of crumbling, fore-foundering, thundering all-surfy seas in; seen Underneath, their glassy barrel, of a fairy ...
— Poems of Gerard Manley Hopkins - Now First Published • Gerard Manley Hopkins

... it was in the river that a brown woman washed his clothes on the stones, returning them with the buttons pounded off; but for every missing button there was sure to be a bright yellow, semi-indelible stain, where the laundress had spread the garments to dry upon a wild berry bush. ...
— From Place to Place • Irvin S. Cobb

... was disconcerted on arriving under the olive-tree to find Dona Rosita no longer in the hammock. He turned into a by-path, where an extraordinary circumstance attracted his attention. The air was perfectly still, but the leaves of a manzanita bush near the misshapen cactus were slightly agitated. Presently Ezekiel saw the stealthy figure of a man emerge from behind it and approach the cactus. Reaching his hand cautiously towards the plant, the stranger detached something from one of its ...
— The Argonauts of North Liberty • Bret Harte

... no mean authority that "the surface of the ground was covered with heather"—positively there is no such plant in Cyprus as heath or heather. As we passed the outskirts of Larnaca, we were introduced to the misery of the plain of Messaria; the so-called heather is a low thorny bush about twelve inches high, which at a distance has some resemblance to the plant in question. Brown is the prevailing colour in this portion of the island, and the aspect was not cheerful as we slowly marched along the native track or highway towards Arpera, carefully ...
— Cyprus, as I Saw it in 1879 • Sir Samuel W. Baker

... troop of women came by, carrying their husbands dinners to the harvest field. The Partridge gave a little plaintive cry, and began fluttering along from bush to bush as if ...
— The Junior Classics, Volume 1 • Willam Patten

... there," replied the Cuckoo, "bigger than this by lots, and with tree-ferns up in the bush. This isn't bad, though, as far as it goes. What's that place over across ...
— For the Sake of the School • Angela Brazil

... told to them who know it not? To a New Englander it might be said that a whortleberry bush changed its mind one day and decided to be a vine, with leaves as glossy as laurel, bells pink-striped and sweet like the arbutus, and berries in clusters and of scarlet instead of black. The Indians call it kinnikinnick, and smoke it in their pipes. White men call ...
— Composition-Rhetoric • Stratton D. Brooks

... for between the Atlanteans and the savage Drilgoes there was as much difference as between a modern American and a blackfellow from the Australian bush. These men were civilized to a degree that even modern America ...
— Astounding Stories of Super-Science, May, 1930 • Various

... you that feel like it, my friends, come on home—the bush is cleared away—you can hear no one say there is nothing to eat here. Why, one man, Gabriel Moore, brought better than 200 cattle from the interior this year—another 100—some 60, some 50, &c. There are no hogs there, ...
— Chambers's Edinburgh Journal, No. 420, New Series, Jan. 17, 1852 • Various

... end and looked at the fairness of the dale spreading wide before her, and a robin came nigh from out of a thorn-bush and sung his song also, the sweet herald of coming winter; and the lapwings wheeled about, black and white, above the meadow by the river, sending forth their wheedling pipe as they hung ...
— The Roots of the Mountains • William Morris

... captain launched out in praises of the charming little town, and had us conveyed to land. We visited the town, as well as the bathing establishment and the lighthouse, and afterwards actually proceeded as far as a place called the "Bush," where, as we were told, we should find a great abundance of strawberries. After wandering about, over fields and meadows, for a good hour in the glowing heat, we found the Bush, it is true, but instead of strawberries, discovered only frogs and ...
— A Woman's Journey Round the World • Ida Pfeiffer

... runs it well, about three miles back, but he's away pretty often in the North and at a settlement on the edge of the bush country. Don't know what he does there, and they're a curious crowd; Dubokars, Russians of sorts, ...
— Blake's Burden • Harold Bindloss

... upon that gentleman's shoulders the blame which should have been debited to the blundering of the administration, steps were being taken to have an armed force sent at once to the scene of tumult, to restore the authority of the Queen. Sir Garnet Wolseley, who has since earned distinction in bush and desert fighting, was the officer put in charge of ...
— The Story of Louis Riel: The Rebel Chief • Joseph Edmund Collins

... as her house stood among the trees, somewhat back from the street, Miss Morgan did not feel afraid to sit in a porch chair, refreshing herself, before going indoors. The wind brought the odor of the lilacs from the bush at the house corner, and the woman sat drinking in the fragrance. She saw a pair of lovers strolling by, who did not observe her. She could hear the murmur of their voices; she did not try to catch their words. She sat silently dreaming and wondering. Again and ...
— The Court of Boyville • William Allen White

... doth push; Misty green Veils the bush. Here a twitter, There a croak! They are coming— The spring-folk! Heart, be not numb; Let the live ...
— Poetical Works of George MacDonald, Vol. 2 • George MacDonald

... about twenty paces from the General's tent, took one of my gloves and stuck it on a bush, and went in to see Gen. Wheaton. I told him that I had decided to start in scouting for him, and I suppose I was in his tent about half an hour talking matters over about the scouting business. All being understood, I started out to get ...
— Thirty-One Years on the Plains and In the Mountains • William F. Drannan

... fright, he slunk edgeways off, as if aware of his own murderous inclinations, turning his head more than once, and shaking it at her; then, with the wonted mystery which enveloped his exits, he was gone! vanished behind a crag, or amidst a bush, or into a hole—Heaven knows; but, like the lady in the Siege of Corinth, who warned the renegade Alp of his approaching end, he ...
— What Will He Do With It, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... in the fire, nor cut down. They said indeed, 'Come and let us cut them off from being a nation, that the name of Israel may be no more in remembrance' (Psa 83:4). But what then? there is a difference betwixt saying and doing; the bush was not therefore consumed because it was set on fire; the church shall not be consumed although she be afflicted (Exo 3:3). And this reason is, because God has still his fifteens; therefore if Abel falls by the hand of Cain, Seth is ...
— The Works of John Bunyan • John Bunyan

... Loudon and Shirley. Close of the Campaign. The Western Border. Armstrong destroys Kittanning. The Scouts of Lake George War Parties from Ticonderoga. Robert Rogers. The Rangers. Their Hardihood and Daring. Disputes as to Quarters of Troops. Expedition of Rogers. A Desperate Bush-fight. Enterprise of Vaudreuil. Rigaud ...
— Montcalm and Wolfe • Francis Parkman

... place where its sides are on about the same level and if possible fairly straight. Then proceed as shown in the accompanying diagram A. Select a conspicuous object on the farther bank of the stream, such as a tree, bush or stone and call it X. Stand opposite it at the near edge of the stream or on the bank, and place a stake A in front of you keeping X and A in direct line, walk backward a few feet and plant a stake B in direct line with ...
— Scouting For Girls, Official Handbook of the Girl Scouts • Girl Scouts

... the style, worn to the last fading thinness of the understanding, there were glimpses, glimmering notions of the patriarchal wanderings, with palm-trees hovering in the horizon, and processions of camels at the distance of three thousand years; there was Moses with the Burning Bush, the number of the Twelve Tribes, types, shadows, glosses on the law and the prophets; there were discussions (dull enough) on the age of Methuselah, a mighty speculation! there were outlines, rude guesses at the shape of Noah's Ark ...
— English Critical Essays - Nineteenth Century • Various

... the main stem of the bush, close to which, upon a forked limb, rested the sparrow's nest, its dark coils reaching downward and its free neck and head waving regularly to and fro, was a monstrous black-snake, and in its jaws fluttered feebly one of the youthful sparrows. Evidently the seizure had just been made when the ...
— A Man and a Woman • Stanley Waterloo

... at the Prince in amazement. So he did not suspect anything? Such carelessness and negligence frightened him. The banker resolved to proceed clearly, and without beating about the bush; to do away with such blind confidence a thunderbolt ...
— Serge Panine, Complete • Georges Ohnet

... begin by limiting the size and scope of government. Under the leadership of Vice President Bush, we have reduced the growth of Federal regulations by more than 25 percent and cut well over 300 million hours of government-required paperwork each year. This will save the public more than $150 billion over the next ...
— Complete State of the Union Addresses from 1790 to the Present • Various

... detachment of U.S. troops arrived, continuing a campaign against the recreant Indians and negroes. The appearance of the men and officers was wretched in the extreme; they had for weeks been beating through swamps and hammocks, thickly matted with palmetto bush, which had torn their undress uniforms in tatters, searching for an invisible enemy, who, thoroughly acquainted with the everglades, defied every attempt at capture. The whole party looked harassed, disappointed, and forlorn. General Taylor was with and had command ...
— An Englishman's Travels in America - His Observations Of Life And Manners In The Free And Slave States • John Benwell

... to our friends that the persons ahead were Ham Spink, Carl Dudder and a lad named Dick Bush, who had in former years been a close ...
— Out with Gun and Camera • Ralph Bonehill

... e'en, Or walk at morning air, Ilk rustling bush will seem to say I used to meet thee there: Then I'll sit down and cry, And live aneath the tree, And when a leaf fa's i' my lap, I'll ...
— The World's Best Poetry, Volume 3 - Sorrow and Consolation • Various

... of all language."—Diversions of Purley, Vol. i, p. 227. "He was accused of himself being idle."—Felch's Comp. Gram., p. 52. "Our meeting is generally dissatisfied with him so removing."—Wm. Edmondson. "The spectacle is too rare of men's deserving solid fame while not seeking it."—Prof. Bush's Lecture on Swedenborg. "What further need was there of an other ...
— The Grammar of English Grammars • Goold Brown

... we are coming to the real point at last, and not without some difficulty. You speak of frequent visits, and certain preferences—very good; for the last hour we have been beating about the bush, and at last you have broached the true question. This is more serious than I thought. It is possible, then, that Madame can have given you grounds for ...
— Ten Years Later - Chapters 1-104 • Alexandre Dumas, Pere

... on a rock beside a bush and thought about this sadly. He could have saved his father much if he had known. He could have assigned his pay. There was a government allowance. He could have invoked the War Relief Act against foreclosure. Between them they could have managed. But he understood quite ...
— Poor Man's Rock • Bertrand W. Sinclair

... those luckless roses, Were on their bush to-day, And that itself the rosebush Were plunged in ocean's spray. Long is it I have loved thee, Thee shall I love alway, My dearest Long is it I have loved thee, Thee shall ...
— The Young Seigneur - Or, Nation-Making • Wilfrid Chateauclair

... Australians, who showed themselves no mean masters of craft. Nearly across to the opposite side of the valley were revealed, by the telescope, the shoulders and black face of a dummy sharpshooter located behind a bush. Some distance up the valley, to the north, a piece of iron piping protruded from cover in imitation of a gun. Dummy loopholes abounded. On the slope of Chunuk Bair, a communication trench wound down. At a certain hour of the afternoon a man coming down this trench would, ...
— The 28th: A Record of War Service in the Australian Imperial Force, 1915-19, Vol. I • Herbert Brayley Collett

... stand, he budges, And sets to work and solemnly trudges, Out from a bush there springs full tilt His four-legged ...
— The Vagabond and Other Poems from Punch • R. C. Lehmann

... shone brightly, in spite of the luminous crescent of a waning moon. The Hishtanyi Chayan was sitting at the same place where he had retired a few hours before, but he no longer prayed; he stared motionless. Tyope lay on his back behind a juniper-bush. He was watching the sky and the approach of dawn. A number of warriors had lain down in the vicinity, awaiting the signal ...
— The Delight Makers • Adolf Bandelier

... such a bad mell, that it catch him nose; and de berry Jurabie himself would run away from it!' I know not the extent of Satanic endurance, but for a mere mortal to bear with it is impossible, as I once found by experience, when it compelled me to take refuge in the bush. ...
— Chambers's Edinburgh Journal, No. 449 - Volume 18, New Series, August 7, 1852 • Various

... that came into his head. "Here am I," he cried rhythmically, as his feet pounded to the left and to the right, "plunging along, like an elephant in the jungle, stripping the branches as I go (he snatched at the twigs of a bush at the roadside), roaring innumerable words, lovely words about innumerable things, running downhill and talking nonsense aloud to myself about roads and leaves and lights and women coming out into the darkness—about women—about Rachel, about ...
— The Voyage Out • Virginia Woolf

... a way to make them far more precious, according to his way of thinking, than roses had ever been before. So he took great pains in going from bush to bush, and exercised his magic touch most indefatigably; until every individual flower and bud, and even the worms at the heart of some of them, were changed to gold. By the time this good work was ...
— The Children's Hour, Volume 3 (of 10) • Various

... a rose from this vine at my plate for breakfast, and you got yours from that pink bush over there by the sun dial," he said, with a softness in his voice that I had not heard since my tenth summer, in which my mother had died. I tingled all over, but held ...
— The Heart's Kingdom • Maria Thompson Daviess

... Capt. Samuel Jordan and appears to have embraced 450 acres. At least in 1625 Jordan was credited with this amount as being "planted" by patent in "the territory of greate Weyanoke." It has been said that he established Jordan's Journey, also known as Beggar's Bush, in 1619 although in the Assembly of 1619 he represented "Charles Citty." He was one of the Assembly Committee of four appointed to examine "the first booke of the fower" of the "Greate Charter." In 1622 Jordan received a share of Company stock from Mary Tue as well as 100 acres ...
— The First Seventeen Years: Virginia 1607-1624 • Charles E. Hatch

... "That's a snowball bush over there," said Miss Ainslie, "and all that corner of the garden will be full of roses in June. They're old-fashioned roses, that I expect you wouldn't care for-blush and cinnamon and sweet briar—but I love them all. That long row is half peonies and half bleeding-hearts, and I have a bed of ...
— Lavender and Old Lace • Myrtle Reed

... they did, arriving at the Bonny Brier Bush a few minutes later in rather a breathless but ...
— The Shield of Silence • Harriet T. Comstock

... and left at an imaginary foe, then soared, and did it all over again two or three times, just to show how far he was from being tired, and how much better he could have done it had it been necessary. Then with a final swoop and a volley of "clickers" he dashed into the bush to receive the congratulations of the one for whom it all was meant and the only spectator for whose opinion he ...
— Two Little Savages • Ernest Thompson Seton

... thick. The edible part is grey and gelatinous, and it contains numerous dark-colored seeds. The fruit is very agreeable, and in taste resembles the gooseberry, and is very cooling. The Granadilla is a shrub or bush, and it twines round the trunks of trees, or climbs up the walls of the Ranchos. It is less abundant on the coast than in ...
— Travels in Peru, on the Coast, in the Sierra, Across the Cordilleras and the Andes, into the Primeval Forests • J. J. von Tschudi

... there an unconscionable time. Was he arguing, preaching, remonstrating? Had he discovered in himself a capacity and a taste for that sort of thing? Or was he perhaps, in an intense dislike for the job, beating about the bush and only puzzling Captain Anthony, the providential man, who, if he expected the girl to appear at any moment, must have been on tenterhooks all the time, and beside himself with impatience to see the back of his brother-in-law. How was it that he had not got ...
— Chance - A Tale in Two Parts • Joseph Conrad

... simple funeral was over, he took Tom by the hand, and set off on the six-mile walk to his home. Tom had cried till he could cry no more, but sobs came quivering up from his heart every now and then, as he passed some well-remembered cottage, or thorn-bush, or tree on the road. His uncle was very sorry for him, but did not know what to say, ...
— The Grey Woman and other Tales • Mrs. (Elizabeth) Gaskell

... great amusement of my life; in battle and abroad I have contrived to knock down my share of the male enemies of my country; in peace and at home I've a mighty pleasant knack of winging a few female bush fighters." ...
— The English Spy • Bernard Blackmantle

... nurseries, or some of them, have been also played at for centuries by Japanese boys and girls. Such are blindman's buff (eye-hiding), puss-in-the-corner, catching, racing, scrambling, a variety of "here we go round the mulberry bush." The game of knuckle-bones is played with five little stuffed bags instead of sheep bones, which the children cannot get, as sheep are not used by the Japanese. Also performances such as honey-pots, heads in chancery, turning round back to back, or hand to hand, are popular among ...
— Child-Life in Japan and Japanese Child Stories • Mrs. M. Chaplin Ayrton

... grandsons of the Turks and Saracens, against whom he had fought: his tremendous name was employed by the Syrian mothers to silence their infants; and if a horse suddenly started from the way, his rider was wont to exclaim, "Dost thou think King Richard is in that bush?" [73] His cruelty to the Mahometans was the effect of temper and zeal; but I cannot believe that a soldier, so free and fearless in the use of his lance, would have descended to whet a dagger against his valiant ...
— The History of The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire - Volume 6 • Edward Gibbon

... am Killian Gottesheim, at your disposal. We are here, sir, at about an equal distance from Mittwalden in Gruenewald and Brandenau in Gerolstein: six leagues to either, and the road excellent; but there is not a wine-bush, not a carter's alehouse, anywhere between. You will have to accept my hospitality for the night; rough hospitality, to which I make you freely welcome; for, sir," he added, with a bow, "it is God who sends ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 7 (of 25) • Robert Louis Stevenson

... two men turned up in a railway construction camp deep in the Rhodesian bush. They were a silent, furtive, friendless pair, dwelling apart, and nobody could discover whence they came, whither they were bound, or, in fact, anything about them. It was generally conceded that they had some horrid secret to ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 156, Feb. 12, 1919 • Various



Words linked to "Bush" :   calliandra, Diervilla sessilifolia, Genista raetam, Baccharis viminea, lentisk, Datura suaveolens, rabbit bush, scarlet bush, buckler mustard, hediondilla, blackthorn, black-fronted bush shrike, he-huckleberry, fetter bush, woody plant, bushman's poison, Aristotelia serrata, beauty bush, needlebush, cranberry heath, Combretum bracteosum, Croton tiglium, Madagascar plum, bush clover, honeysuckle, minnie bush, huckleberry oak, staggerbush, arbutus, cupflower, bush out, mallow, groundsel bush, maikoa, Ilex cornuta, crape jasmine, leatherleaf, jasmine, bush jacket, Leucothoe fontanesiana, minniebush, dog laurel, lomatia, Graptophyllum pictum, Aspalathus linearis, butcher's broom, German tamarisk, Benjamin bush, lily-of-the-valley tree, juniper, Jew bush, Biscutalla laevigata, Jupiter's beard, blue cohosh, coca, cajan pea, Dubyuh, crowberry, fothergilla, flowering hazel, bean trefoil, Lyonia mariana, Datura sanguinea, Leycesteria formosa, low-bush blueberry, dewberry bush, blackberry bush, candlewood, supply, coyote brush, flannelbush, highbush cranberry, Acalypha virginica, Adenium multiflorum, Malosma laurina, day jessamine, ephedra, crepe gardenia, corkwood, kali, Lepechinia calycina, chaparral broom, jujube bush, honey bell, cotoneaster, Indian currant, bush shrike, guelder rose, Dalea spinosa, crape myrtle, Japanese angelica tree, bush willow, gardenia, George H.W. Bush, chanal, Japanese andromeda, pubic hair, coronilla, Chilean hazelnut, bush tit, Leiophyllum buxifolium, ligneous plant, Embothrium coccineum, Caesalpinia sepiaria, caper, Kochia scoparia, corkwood tree, beach plum bush, Caulophyllum thalictrioides, Jew-bush, creosote bush, bristly locust, impala lily, coyote bush, President Bush, bush violet, Erythroxylon coca, kapuka, bridal wreath, Chimonanthus praecox, poison bush, Argyroxiphium sandwicense, false azalea, Codariocalyx motorius, amorpha, cyrilla, Indigofera tinctoria, Francoa ramosa, European cranberrybush, grevillea, camelia, bush bean, Camellia sinensis, Aristotelia racemosa, Batis maritima, desert willow, Leucothoe racemosa, andromeda, devil's walking stick, fringe bush, bushy, Chilean flameflower, glory pea, ringworm bush, East Indian rosebay, governor's plum, dusty miller, joewood, blueberry root, Australian heath, Adam's apple, flat pea, bush nasturtium, crepe myrtle, Ardisia crenata, Cercis occidentalis, African hemp, Datura arborea, Japan allspice, Bauhinia monandra, Christmas berry, barbasco, Lyonia ligustrina, bush hibiscus, Clethra alnifolia, Cineraria maritima, Epigaea repens, European cranberry bush, kudu lily, derris, chaparral, catjang pea, Heteromeles arbutifolia, squaw-bush, flowering shrub, mimosa bush, bridal-wreath, feijoa, Brugmansia suaveolens, catclaw, George W. Bush, alpine totara, bush vetch, Anadenanthera colubrina, Chrysolepis sempervirens, kei apple, Anagyris foetida, lotus tree, kelpwort, Ledum palustre, raspberry bush, Dalmatian laburnum, desert rose, flame pea, bush poppy, fire-bush, crepe jasmine, cranberry, Cytesis proliferus, Kolkwitzia amabilis, bird's-eye bush, George Bush, belvedere, daisy bush, Larrea tridentata, Colutea arborescens, quail bush, castor bean plant, hollygrape, Aspalathus cedcarbergensis, holly-leaves barberry, bracelet wood, castor-oil plant, black bead, mountain fetterbush, angel's trumpet, bean caper, Dirca palustris, Guevina avellana, capsicum pepper plant, Chile nut, gorse, bush league, Chiococca alba, kalmia, pepper bush, Caesalpinia decapetala, barilla, oriental bush cherry, shrub, honeybells, buckthorn, croton, cannabis, provide, Lambertia formosa, chalice vine, Benzoin odoriferum, Lysiloma sabicu, Chilopsis linearis, crystal tea, Lupinus arboreus, Japanese allspice, forsythia, Himalaya honeysuckle, daisybush, feijoa bush, hemp, forestiera, flowering quince, fire bush, Canella-alba, Astroloma humifusum, Cajanus cajan, George Walker Bush, butterfly flower, caragana, scrub, currant bush, Hakea lissosperma, Conradina glabra, Acocanthera oppositifolia, butterfly bush, cat's-claw, clianthus, Mahernia verticillata, Comptonia peregrina, Canella winterana, American spicebush, Anthyllis barba-jovis, bramble bush, indigo, Brassaia actinophylla, Hercules'-club, Jerusalem thorn, gooseberry bush, Aralia elata, American cranberry bush, coca plant, Lindera benzoin, dombeya, Labrador tea, Mahonia nervosa, brittle bush, Dubya, horsebean, Brazilian potato tree, chanar, camellia, frangipani, columnea, lilac, Brunfelsia americana, barberry, Hakea laurina, furze, lawyer bush, batoko palm, needle bush, cranberry bush, laurel sumac, California redbud



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