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Class  v. i.  To be grouped or classed. "The genus or family under which it classes."






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"Class" Quotes from Famous Books



... notice of the geologists of the British Association, assembled that year at Glasgow, and which, in the collected form, compose my little work on the Old Red Sandstone. The paper itself rose rapidly in circulation, till it ultimately attained to its place among what are known as our first-class Scottish newspapers; and of its subscribers, perhaps a more considerable proportion of the whole are men who have received a university education, than can be reckoned by any other Scotch journal of the same number of readers. And during the course of the first three years, ...
— My Schools and Schoolmasters - or The Story of my Education. • Hugh Miller

... acquaintance has not lain so much among that class of sinners as to give me much experience of the way in which they are treated. But, judging from what I have seen, I should say they meet with full as much leniency as they deserve; and supposing ...
— Ruth • Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell

... is now occupying a more and more important place in education. Oxford, Cambridge, the London University, the public schools, one after another, are taking up the subject in earnest; so are the middle-class schools; so I trust will all primary schools throughout the country; and I hope that my children, at least, if not I myself, will see the day, when ignorance of the primary laws and facts of science will be looked ...
— Town Geology • Charles Kingsley

... she was a stranger and foreigner in Tideshead. At first she said "you" and "I" when she was talking with the girls, but soon it became easier to say "we." She took great pleasure in doing whatever the rest did, from joining a class in Sunday-school to carrying round one of the subscription-papers to pay for some Fourth of July fireworks, which went up in a blaze of splendor on the evening ...
— Betty Leicester - A Story For Girls • Sarah Orne Jewett

... in Dickens' time, did not—nay could not—give birth to a character which could be truly said to represent the complex London type. The environment of the lower classes—the east end and the Boro'—is ever redolent of him, and he of it. The lower-middle or upper-lower class is best defined by that individual's predilection for the "good old Strand;" while as the scale rises through the petty states of Suburbia to the luxuries of Mayfair or Belgravia,—or to define one locality ...
— Dickens' London • Francis Miltoun

... point at which they could be hired. While the Vanderbilts and other magnates were manufacturing law at will, and boldly appropriating, under color of law, colossal possessions in real and personal property, how was the law, as embodied in legislatures, officials and courts acting toward the working class? ...
— Great Fortunes from Railroads • Gustavus Myers

... exponents of all passions and affections. To an unpoetical reader such passages always appear mere raving and absurdity—and to this censure a very great part of the volume before us will certainly be exposed, with this class of readers. Even in the judgment of a fitter audience, however, it must, we fear, be admitted, that, besides the riot and extravagance of his fancy, the scope and substance of Mr. K.'s poetry is rather too dreary and abstracted to excite ...
— Famous Reviews • Editor: R. Brimley Johnson

... in the water like fish: when you least expect them, they appear on the surface, and hurl the fire-bombs at you; while the instant your bow is bent to shoot them, down they dive like frogs."' The third class was not to be intimidated; the lamas had opened the Book of Celestial Secrets, and predicted victory; and on they marched, till met with the intelligence that the rebels, hearing of the approach of this invincible legion, had sued for and ...
— Chambers's Edinburgh Journal, No. 451 - Volume 18, New Series, August 21, 1852 • Various

... First, those in which the excitement is increased, or in which it verges to, or has actually reached, the point of predisposition to sthenic disease; Secondly, those in which the excitement is diminished, or in which it verges towards asthenic disease. This last class, as has been done before, may be subdivided into two orders. The first will comprise those diseases in which the excitability is sufficiently abundant, or even accumulated, but where the excitement is deficient from a want of energy in the exciting powers. In the second, ...
— Popular Lectures on Zoonomia - Or The Laws of Animal Life, in Health and Disease • Thomas Garnett

... assented. The change he had noticed most was that the old zest of living was gone from her still beautiful black eyes, and that her freckles had augmented. He had met her oftenest in church. She had the Suez Sunday-school's primary class, and more than filled the wide vacancy caused by Miss Mary Salter's marriage to the other pastor. These two wives had grown to be close friends. On the Sunday to which we have alluded they had their infants baptized together. Fannie's was a girl and did not cry. Johanna, in the gallery, ...
— John March, Southerner • George W. Cable

... efforts of Admiral D'Estaing and General Lafayette to win back the allegiance of the French Canadians. The appeals of these two distinguished men to the memories of the old subjects of France had no immediate effect except upon a very small class, although it might have been different had French troops made their appearance on the St. Lawrence. One Canadian priest, La Valiniere, who was connected with the seminary of St. Sulpice in Montreal, was sent to England with the approval of the bishop, for his openly expressed sympathy ...
— Canada • J. G. Bourinot

... the third class of gods, in addition to the gods of the earth and the sky, namely the gods of the highest heaven, more serene in their character than the active and fighting gods of the air and the clouds, and more remote from the eyes of man, and therefore more mysterious in the exercise of their power than ...
— India: What can it teach us? - A Course of Lectures Delivered before the University Of Cambridge • F. Max Mueller

... soon speak that electric sentence,—inspiration to the loyal North, doom to the traitorous aristocracy whose cup of guilt is full! Let him say that it is a war of mass against class, of America against feudalism, of the schoolmaster against the slave-master, of workmen against the barons, of the ballot-box against the barracoon. This is what the struggle means. Proclaim it so, and what a light breaks through our leaden sky! The war-wave rolls then with the impetus ...
— Starr King in California • William Day Simonds

... past the house; but, seeing nobody worth seeing, I reluctantly turned my steps farther on to a garden restaurant—a middle-class place, with tables under chestnuts and beeches or in shady arbors for parties of ...
— The Chauffeur and the Chaperon • C. N. Williamson

... and what has been written of Tulips and other plants whose popularity has been great at some time or other. Why have Cactuses gone out of favour? It is impossible to give any satisfactory answer to this question. No doubt they belong to that class of objects which is only popular whilst it pleases the eye or tickles the fancy; and the eye and the fancy having tired of it, ...
— Cactus Culture For Amateurs • W. Watson

... filth and want of air, where in the short intervals of rest from commercial life, badly cooked meals were hurriedly eaten, at a bare wooden table, listening all the while for the tinkle of the shop-bell. With this class, nothing has importance but the street, the street with its passing purchasers and idlers, and its overflowing holiday crowd, that on Sundays throng the side walks and pavements. And how bored she was, wretched creature, in the ...
— Artists' Wives • Alphonse Daudet

... what each instrument was fit for, and to bring all forces to bear in the right way—a man of consummate adroitness, to sail in torpedo-sown waters without exciting an explosion, though conducting wires of local prejudice, class sensitiveness, and personal foible on every hand led straight down to magazines of wrath which might shatter the cause in a moment—a man having resources of his own to such an extent that he could supplement from himself ...
— James Otis The Pre-Revolutionist • John Clark Ridpath

... rich and constantly travel to escape the dreariness at home; and that, if they are not absolutely mad, they are all a little queer. It was a fancy prevalent in Hamlet's day. We had the English service in the Villa Nardi in the evening. There are some Englishmen staying here, of the class one finds in all the sunny spots of Europe, ennuye and growling, in search of some elixir that shall bring back youth and enjoyment. They seem divided in mind between the attractions of the equable climate of this region and the fear of the gout which lurks in the ...
— Baddeck and That Sort of Thing • Charles Dudley Warner

... world as lead pencil makers. They also manufacture many inks and have done so since 1881, when they built now factories at Noisy-le-Sac, near Paris. Blue-black and violet-black writing and copying inks of the class made by the "Antoines" are the principal kinds. They do not offer for sale, tanno-gallate of iron ink without "added" color. A branch house in New York ...
— Forty Centuries of Ink • David N. Carvalho

... sparrow, or the chewink. In adjoining counties, in the same latitude, and equally inland, but possessing a different geological formation and different forest-timber, you will observe quite a different class of birds. In a land of the beech and sugar maple I do not find the same songsters that I know where thrive the oak, chestnut, and laurel. In going from a district of the Old Red Sandstone to where I walk upon the old Plutonic Rock, not fifty miles distant, I miss in ...
— Wake-Robin • John Burroughs

... infirmity more common among men of letters, authors, &c., than any other class; indeed, one is inclined to think it is no rare accompaniment of talent. A few celebrated names occur to me who suffered weakness of distinct vision to see but the better near. I am sure your correspondents could add many to the list. I mark them down ...
— Notes and Queries, Number 223, February 4, 1854 • Various

... here referred to and invite others to be given by the class. Then drill on these facts until they ...
— The Bible Book by Book - A Manual for the Outline Study of the Bible by Books • Josiah Blake Tidwell

... and took passage for home, and I had a first-class state-room, and laid in a lot of good clothes before I started. I don't think I ever had greater comfort in my life than sittin' on deck, smokin' a good cigar, and watchin' the able-bodied seamen at ...
— Mrs. Cliff's Yacht • Frank R. Stockton

... in the Atlantic department. With these observations, it is now proper to advert to the courses and distances which must be taken, and the expenses which will be required in this, which shall be denominated the Pacific Department; the work to be performed by first-class ...
— A General Plan for a Mail Communication by Steam, Between Great Britain and the Eastern and Western Parts of the World • James MacQueen

... because I dare say, on the other hand, many could be told of who fail to do their work in single life, and who fail to get happiness in it as well. Put the one class over against the other, and then consider the many, many women who marry for no other reason than from the fear of living single, it will go far to account for the many unhappy marriages that we see, and far to prove that marriage is the ...
— Janet's Love and Service • Margaret M Robertson

... man. He disliked anything that was "not quite nice," and detested a strong light, whether it were thrown upon life or landscape; in bright sunshine he always carried a white umbrella lined with green. The game he played best was croquet, and here he was really first class; but he was also skilled in every known form of Patience, and played each evening unless he happened to ...
— Jan and Her Job • L. Allen Harker

... an admission: Regardless of all political and economic theories, treating of the fundamental differences between the various groups within the human race, regardless of class and race distinctions, regardless of all artificial boundary lines between woman's rights and man's rights, I hold that there is a point where these differentiations may meet and grow into one ...
— Mother Earth, Vol. 1 No. 1, March 1906 • Various

... moment; if it ceases to deal with a single detail only that detail remains in statu quo, and is often embedded in portions of the organism quite away from the point where it would have been found had it continued to evolve; certain cysts belong to this class. ...
— Reincarnation - A Study in Human Evolution • Th. Pascal

... what I shall offer," said James. "And we may make it two shillings." Through his mind flitted the idea of 1/11-1/2—but he rejected it. "You don't realize that I'm catering for a higher class of custom—" ...
— The Lost Girl • D. H. Lawrence

... inhabited and animated dead bodies. It is an old, and thoroughly Hindu, Legend composed in Sanskrit, and is the germ which culminated in the Arabian Nights, and which inspired the "Golden Ass" of Apuleius, Boccacio's "Decamerone," the "Pentamerone," and all that class ...
— Vikram and the Vampire • Sir Richard F. Burton

... the Nation there is nothing to choose between on the one hand the corruptionist, the bribe-giver, the bribe-taker, the man who employs his great talent to swindle his fellow-citizens on a large scale, and, on the other hand, the preacher of class hatred, the man who, whether from ignorance or from willingness to sacrifice his country to his ambition, persuades well-meaning but wrong-headed men to try to destroy the instruments upon which our prosperity mainly rests. Let each group of men beware of ...
— Complete State of the Union Addresses from 1790 to the Present • Various

... Winnington, separated from the Captain, plunged into a dimly-lighted third class, and found himself treading on the toes of an acquaintance. He saluted an elderly lady wearing a bonnet and mantle of primeval cut, and a dress so ample in the skirt that it still suggested the days of crinoline. She was abnormally tall, and awkwardly built; she wore cotton gloves, and her boots ...
— Delia Blanchflower • Mrs. Humphry Ward

... prudence of uniting communities by the multiplication of international interests; the abandonment of the policy of diplomatic and military intermeddling; the advocacy, in short, of the common good in place of a spurious patriotism, of selfish, local, or class aims, formed the subject of Cobden's public utterances. But his intimate friends, and in particular his regular correspondents, were aware that his political criticism was as general as it was accurate. The loss then of his wise ...
— Speeches on Questions of Public Policy, Volume 1 • John Bright

... Osmond's, but it had at this moment an equal distinctness. It was rather a tribute to Miss Stackpole's virtues than a reference to her faults. He thought her very remarkable, very brilliant, and he had, in theory, no objection to the class to which she belonged. Lady correspondents appeared to him a part of the natural scheme of things in a progressive country, and though he never read their letters he supposed that they ministered somehow to ...
— The Portrait of a Lady - Volume 2 (of 2) • Henry James

... The other class of exceptions is the group of songs on Jacobite themes. The rebellion led by Prince Charles Edward in 1745 had produced a considerable quantity of campaign verse, almost all without poetic value; but after the turmoil had died down and the Stuart cause was regarded as finally lost, there appeared ...
— Robert Burns - How To Know Him • William Allan Neilson

... woodwork of the coach, one into each door, and the other two into the body of the coach. After which he put the horses to with a rapidity and skill which bespoke in him a man familiar from childhood with all the details of an art pushed to extremes in our day by that honorable class of society which ...
— The Companions of Jehu • Alexandre Dumas, pere

... Ischian earthquakes, which belong to a special class, it is evident that there is generally some slight preparation for a great earthquake. For a few hours or days beforehand, weak shocks and tremors are felt or rumbling noises heard within the future meizoseismal area. But, unfortunately, ...
— A Study of Recent Earthquakes • Charles Davison

... all." And that would have been the real solution of the social problem. Such was not the case. The doctrine of protection had for generations too profoundly corrupted the age, public sentiments and ideas. No. In making inroads upon the National Assembly, each class, in accordance with your system, has endeavored to make the law an instrument of rapine. There have been demanded heavier imposts, gratuitous credit, the right to employment, the right to assistance, the guaranty of incomes and of minimum wages, gratuitous instruction, loans to industry, etc., ...
— Sophisms of the Protectionists • Frederic Bastiat

... listen to middlin'-class music now," said Gold, "and find a pleasure in it. But for a time I could not bring myself to take any sort of joy in music. You think it foolish? Well, perhaps it was. I am not careful to defend it, gentlemen, and it may happen that I might not if I tried. But that was how I came to give up the ...
— Aunt Rachel • David Christie Murray

... for them all. With the aid of two younger sisters, mere children, at first, and an old black woman, who came once a week to wash, all the work was done by herself, including baking, ironing, cooking, cleaning, &c.; and yet Patsey found time to give up four hours a day to teaching a class of some dozen children, belonging to several neighbouring families. This school furnished the only money that passed through her hands, and contributed the only regular means of support to the family. They received, however, much kind assistance, in many ...
— Elinor Wyllys - Vol. I • Susan Fenimore Cooper

... countryman. A day of thanksgiving was appointed. In all the cities of the Seven Provinces the public joy manifested itself by festivities of which the expense was chiefly defrayed by voluntary gifts. Every class assisted. The poorest labourer could help to set up an arch of triumph, or to bring sedge to a bonfire. Even the ruined Huguenots of France could contribute the aid of their ingenuity. One art which they had carried with them into banishment was the art of making fireworks; and they now, in honour ...
— The History of England from the Accession of James II. - Volume 3 (of 5) • Thomas Babington Macaulay

... of Denzil was a rather uncommon specimen of the class. She inclined to plumpness, was lively in the extreme, wore very fashionable garments of the brightest colours, and—although somewhat elderly—still cherished a hope that some young man would elevate her to the ...
— The Silent House • Fergus Hume

... the Paris Salon (artistes Francais) were twenty-four oils and water-colors from 1894 to 1906, obtaining an honorable mention in 1901 with the "Thames at Whitchurch"; a gold medal, third class, in 1905, with "The Torrent"; and a gold medal, second class, in 1906, with his triptych "The Giant Cities" (New York, Paris, London), which makes him hors concours, with the great distinction of being the first American ...
— The Man In The High-Water Boots - 1909 • F. Hopkinson Smith

... talking of the class of books you keep, father," she said, lowering her voice: "I'm sure of it. They are as unsavory in his nostrils as to the reformers in the village. They'd all excommunicate you ...
— Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science - April, 1873, Vol. XI, No. 25. • Various

... them to remain, and have, in their impatience, stored them with new ideas and opinions—many of them good and useful, but too hastily adopted, and not in harmony with each other to be productive of a good result, until time has enabled their owners to class and arrange them. ...
— The Idler in France • Marguerite Gardiner

... Philistines in Moses' time) worshipped Dagon, the fish-god, and so forth. The Egyptians had gods without number—gods invented out of beasts, and birds, and the fruits of the earth, and the season, and the weather, and the sun and moon and stars. Each class and trade, from the highest to the lowest, and each city and town throughout the land seems to have had its special god, who was worshipped there, and expected to take care of that particular class of men ...
— The Gospel of the Pentateuch • Charles Kingsley

... yesterday. Perhaps it would be right before making anything public to consider the question of Drawing-Rooms likewise, which are of such importance to the trades-people of London. It would be painful for the Queen to think that she should be the cause of disappointment and loss to this class of her subjects, particularly at this moment of commercial stagnation. The Queen conceives that it would be the right thing that the same principle laid down for the Levees should be followed with regard to Drawing-Rooms, the Prince holding them for her. The Queen is anxious to have soon Sir Robert's ...
— The Letters of Queen Victoria, Volume 1 (of 3), 1837-1843) • Queen Victoria

... Perhaps Anne caught something of the "model" spirit from Minnie Andrews; at least she got on very well with Mr. Phillips thenceforth. She flung herself into her studies heart and soul, determined not to be outdone in any class by Gilbert Blythe. The rivalry between them was soon apparent; it was entirely good natured on Gilbert's side; but it is much to be feared that the same thing cannot be said of Anne, who had certainly an unpraiseworthy tenacity for holding grudges. She ...
— Anne Of Green Gables • Lucy Maud Montgomery

... and 24 after they had decided to become ministers; only 66 mentioned sexual intercourse as their chief temptation; but altogether sexual temptations outnumbered all others together.[294] Moraglia, who made inquiry of 200 women of the lower class in Italy, found that 120 acknowledged either that they still masturbate or that they had done so during a long period.[295] Gualino found that 23 per cent. men of the professional classes in North ...
— Studies in the Psychology of Sex, Volume 1 (of 6) • Havelock Ellis

... when we used to get together in our citrus seminars and in our horticultural and agricultural meetings we used to try and make a man say on what class of soil his home or orchard was located, so that we might get his viewpoint. For the successful nut orchardist, in a small way, must, of necessity, be a successful agriculturist. He must understand soils. You can't have successful ...
— Northern Nut Growers Association, Report of the Proceedings at the Seventh Annual Meeting • Various

... and sophistication of those who reside in the most aristocratic capitals. For that is another thing that Charleston is; it is unqualifiedly the aristocratic capital of the United States; the last stronghold of a unified American upper class; the last remaining American city in which Madeira and Port and noblesse oblige are fully and widely understood, and are employed according to the ...
— American Adventures - A Second Trip 'Abroad at home' • Julian Street

... good.* (* "Ils sont capable de tout, excepte le bien.") Persons who had played a part in connection with the recent rebellion in Ireland were subject to transportation, and were naturally a disaffected class. England had only 600 troops to maintain order in that "society of brigands," and discipline was not very well observed amongst them. Particulars were given as to how an invasion ...
— The Life of Captain Matthew Flinders • Ernest Scott

... into the same class because it seeks to provide and make certain definite planning by the railroads themselves, with the assistance of the government, to eliminate the duplication and waste that is now resulting in railroad receiverships and continuing ...
— The Fireside Chats of Franklin Delano Roosevelt • Franklin Delano Roosevelt

... Indian blood, but there are many families of pure Castilian descent. The latter, in general, are the landed proprietors; the former constitute the tradesmen, herders, and peons. There is also a large unproductive class, mainly of Indians, who are living in a savage state. In general the manners and customs are ...
— Commercial Geography - A Book for High Schools, Commercial Courses, and Business Colleges • Jacques W. Redway

... There was a small purse made up by the passengers, each one contributing what he pleased, for the person who should first discover land. We gave two shillings each. The minister would not give anything. It seems that meanness is a peculiarity of this class of people. This was done in order that the sailors might look out more zealously for land, and so we might not fall upon land unexpectedly. The purse was nailed to the mast, so that, being always in sight, it might be a constant incentive, and whoever might first ...
— Journal of Jasper Danckaerts, 1679-1680 • Jasper Danckaerts

... one can be climbing the Rockies and at the same time partaking of an excellent dinner served as in a first-class hotel!" ...
— Hunter's Marjory - A Story for Girls • Margaret Bruce Clarke

... other salts have been used as manures in which the effect is undoubtedly due to the alkalies themselves. With the exception of common salt, most of the alkaline salts have only been used to a limited extent; and it is remarkable that, so far as our present experience goes, there is no class of substances from which ...
— Elements of Agricultural Chemistry • Thomas Anderson

... Delaires. He watched to see her get up. She passed close to him. She did not have the height that his training had taught him was essential to beauty, but she had certain attributes that made one suddenly class height with other bloodless statistics. From her crown of brown hair to her tiny slippers she was alive. Vitality did not radiate from her, but it seemed to lurk, like a constant, in her whole body and in her every supple movement. Lewis did not see it, but she was of the type ...
— Through stained glass • George Agnew Chamberlain

... passengers numbered fourteen, exclusive of ourselves, and while we remained in Sinclair Bay, we had a good chance of criticising them. All good fellows, no doubt, but mostly of the trading class, and not very attractive, physically or mentally. There were two women in the number, the wife and daughter of a clothier resident in Iceland; but among the entire party we did not find any one likely to add to the sociability of the voyage, so, English-like, we kept to ourselves as ...
— A Girl's Ride in Iceland • Ethel Brilliana Alec-Tweedie

... the spectator to see her the centre of a group of young people, and him only acknowledged from time to time by a Parthian snub. Nothing, however, could have been more satisfactory than the sisterly surrounding of this latter bride. They were of a better class of Irish people; and if it had been any sacrifice for her to marry so old a man, they were doing their best to give the affair at least the liveliness of a wake. There were five or six of those great handsome girls, with their generous curves and wholesome colors, and they were ...
— Henry James, Jr. • William Dean Howells

... observed. Just as nothing is more beautiful than a word fitly spoken, so nothing is rarer than the use of a word in its exact meaning. There is a tendency to overwork both words and phrases that is not restricted to any particular class. The learned sin in this respect even as do the ignorant, and the practise spreads until it becomes an epidemic. The epidemic word with us yesterday was unquestionably "conscription"; several months ...
— Fifteen Thousand Useful Phrases • Grenville Kleiser

... listened calmly to Mother Shipton's desire to cut somebody's heart out, to the repeated statements of the Duchess that she would die in the road, and to the alarming oaths that seemed to be bumped out of Uncle Billy as he rode forward. With the easy good-humor characteristic of his class, he insisted upon exchanging his own riding-horse, "Five Spot," for the sorry mule which the Duchess rode. But even this act did not draw the party into any closer sympathy. The young woman readjusted her somewhat draggled plumes with a feeble, faded ...
— Short Stories Old and New • Selected and Edited by C. Alphonso Smith

... Our first-class cabin passengers were three, Reginald K. Whinney, scientific man, world wanderer, data-demon and a devil when roused; Herman Swank, bohemian, artist, and vagabond, forever in search of new sensations, and myself, Walter ...
— The Cruise of the Kawa • Walter E. Traprock

... Perhaps the public have ceased to care for history thus theatrically illustrated, or prefers to gather its information on the subject from despatches and special correspondence. The last theatrical venture of this class referred to our army's exploits in Abyssinia. But the play did not greatly please. Modern battles have, indeed, outgrown the stage, and the faculty of making "imaginary puissance" has become lost. In the theatre, as elsewhere, the ...
— A Book of the Play - Studies and Illustrations of Histrionic Story, Life, and Character • Dutton Cook

... many things which they don't," said Mr. Bhaer, sitting down beside him, while Franz led a class of small students through the intricacies of the ...
— Little Men - Life at Plumfield With Jo's Boys • Louisa May Alcott

... them, The holy people." There are some who call themselves holiness people, but the prophet says we shall be called, "The holy people." Holiness factions and sects have actually sprung into existence, which declare that sectism and division is necessary. This class of holiness is not that described in the foregoing scriptures. Bible holiness will in every individual instance destroy everything out of men's hearts that separates or divides. Divisions are the outgrowth of carnality ...
— Sanctification • J. W. Byers

... admitted, that there is a class of persons (we are afraid they cannot be called readers), to whom the representation of vulgar manners, in vulgar language, will afford much entertainment. We are afraid, however, that the ingenious writers who supply the hawkers and ballad-singers, have very nearly monopolised ...
— Famous Reviews • Editor: R. Brimley Johnson

... plain man could not be saved without them! However, he respected the lad for having known his own mind and not hung about in idleness, and he had no opinion of clerks, whether monks or priests. Indeed, the low esteem in which the clergy as a class were held in London was one of the very evil signs of the times. Ambrose was invited to dine and sup at the Dragon court every Sunday and holiday, and he was glad to accept, since the hospitality was so free, and he thus was able to see his brother and Tibble; besides that, it prevented ...
— The Armourer's Prentices • Charlotte M. Yonge

... his face were the expression of thought and power rather than of age. He was tall, thin, and soldier-like, extremely courteous in manner and speech, but grave and not inclined to mirth; he belonged to that class of active men in whom the constant exercise of vitality and intelligence appears to prolong life instead of exhausting its force, who possess a constitution in which the body is governed by the mind, and who, being generally little capable of enjoying the pleasure of the moment, find ...
— Paul Patoff • F. Marion Crawford

... he said. "I don't know how it was. But just at that time there was a miserable story going on at the mills—I used to see the poor girl day by day—and hear the women talk. You know how that class of woman talks and gives you details and enlarges on them? The girl was about Margery's age. I don't know how it was; but one day, as I was standing listening to a gossipping married woman in one of their squalid, respectable parlours, and she was declaiming and ...
— In Connection with the De Willoughby Claim • Frances Hodgson Burnett

... machine, for the first time I am toiling and sweating as I rather think it was intended that men should toil and sweat. And the friends that I am making are the sign and seal of the levelling effects of this great war. Not one of the men of what you might call my own class interests me half as much as Tommy Tracy, who before he entered the service drove the car of one of Dad's business associates. I have often ridden behind Tommy, but he doesn't know it. And I don't intend that he shall. ...
— The Tin Soldier • Temple Bailey

... of thought, I could write acceptable English verse, but even ordinary newspaper prose was beyond my reach, and an attempt I made to write a novel drifted into a miserable failure; but the following poems opened to me the doors of a first-class London newspaper, and I was at once entrusted with some important ...
— Confessions of a Young Man • George Moore

... and foul cobwebs as world never was before; overloaded, overclouded, to the zenith and the nadir of it, by incredible uncredited traditions, solemnly sordid hypocrisies, and beggarly deliriums old and new; which latter class of objects it was clearly the part of every noble heart to expend all its lightnings and energies in burning up without delay, and sweeping into their native Chaos out of such a Cosmos as this. Which process, it ...
— The Life of John Sterling • Thomas Carlyle

... brass bands among its colored population. "Kelly's Band" and the "St. Bernard Brass Band" deserve particular mention here. The "St. Bernard" is composed of a very intelligent class of young men, studious, and of excellent moral character; in fact, they form a splendid corps of musicians, equalled by but few others, and excelled by none. With these two bands and some others, the names ...
— Music and Some Highly Musical People • James M. Trotter

... the vessel founders; but most are only ducked, and scramble to shore. And the reader's experience of A. Pendennis, Esquire, of the Upper Temple, will enable him to state whether that gentleman belonged to the class of persons who were likely to sink ...
— The History of Pendennis • William Makepeace Thackeray

... Cairo the General-in-Chief had no longer any doubt as to the course which the Porte intended to adapt. The numerous class of persons who believed that the Ottoman Porte had consented to our occupation of Egypt were suddenly undeceived. It, was then asked how we could, without that consent, have attempted such an enterprise? Nothing, it was said, could justify the temerity of such an expedition, if it should produce ...
— Memoirs of Napoleon Bonaparte, v3 • Louis Antoine Fauvelet de Bourrienne

... class belong the architectures of Egypt, Greece, and Gothic architecture as practised in the north of Europe; to the second belong Roman architecture of the splendid period, Moorish architecture, and Italian Gothic, so called. In the first class the bones ...
— Architecture and Democracy • Claude Fayette Bragdon

... Ohio Hotel. But I don't mean to stay. I'm lookin' out some first-class boardin'-house, where they don't charge mor'n five dollars ...
— Tom, The Bootblack - or, The Road to Success • Horatio Alger

... slightest likelihood of rebellion on the part of the negroes after 1840, unless some unrighteous attempts be made to keep up the helotism of the class by enactments of partial laws. They could have no interest in rebellion, they could gain nothing by it; and might lose every thing; nor do I think they dream of such a thing. They are ardently attached to the British government, and would be ...
— The Anti-Slavery Examiner, Omnibus • American Anti-Slavery Society

... taxation because it was one of humanity, it would be quite as difficult to deal with it under any other bill for levying a duty as under this. If the tax seemed unjust because it bore heavily upon a single class, that would be a good reason for remitting many taxes which there was no hesitation in imposing. If ten dollars seemed a heavy duty, a little calculation would show that it was only about the proposed ad valorem duty of five per centum on most other importations. "It is to ...
— James Madison • Sydney Howard Gay

... unscrupulous enemy, an enemy socialistic, scientific and efficient to an unexampled degree, it seemed indeed to be inspired for a time by an unwonted energy and unanimity. Youth and the common people shone. The sons of every class went out to fight and die, full of a splendid dream of this war. Easy-going vanished from the foreground of the picture. But only to creep back again as the first inspiration passed. Presently the older men, the seasoned ...
— Mr. Britling Sees It Through • H. G. Wells

... the work of his mother's father, one of the celebrated portrait painters of his time, and were replicas of the eminent and mighty he had painted. Maharajas, kings, emperors, famous diplomats, men of letters, artists of his own small class, statesmen and several of the famous beauties of their brief day; these had been the favorite grandson's inheritance from Masewell Price, and they made an impressive frieze, unique in the splendid homes of the city of ...
— The Avalanche • Gertrude Franklin Horn Atherton

... fat in a superlative degree, and her obesity gave her a middle-aged air to which she probably had no right by the almanac. She looked quite forty, and might well have been not more than thirty. She made a typical London figure of the nondescript industrial class. It is inadequate to say that her shabby black-trimmed bonnet, her shabby sham-fur coat half hiding a large dubious apron, her shabby frayed black skirt, and her shabby, immense, amorphous boots,—it is inadequate to say that these things seemed to have come immediately out of a tenth-rate ...
— Mr. Prohack • E. Arnold Bennett

... birth it expired, as all Reviews must for which there is no demand. Authors had ceased to send their publications to it, and, consequently, to purchase it; for I have already hinted that it was almost entirely supported by authors of a particular class, who expected to see their publications foredoomed to immortality in its pages. The behaviour of these authors towards this unfortunate publication I can attribute to no other cause than to a report which was industriously circulated, ...
— Lavengro - The Scholar, The Gypsy, The Priest • George Borrow

... reader is here referred to Lady Byron's other letters, in Part III.; which also show the peculiarly active and philosophical character of her mind, and the class of subjects on ...
— Lady Byron Vindicated • Harriet Beecher Stowe

... frank-hearted girl poured out the story of her troubles, and Edith came to have a greater respect and sympathy for her "kind and humble neighbors" as she characterized them in her own mind. Still with her familiarity with the farming class, kept up since her summer in the country as a child, she made a broad distinction between them and the mere laborer. Moreover, the practical girl wished to conciliate the Laceys and every one else she could, for she had a presentiment that there were many ...
— What Can She Do? • Edward Payson Roe

... returned to the charge with a bulky envelope containing matter of great interest. One of the enclosures certified that, for the term of three months, I was transferred to Class W.P., Army Reserve. I made various conjectures as to the meaning of "W," and so did Cinderella. On the whole we favoured "Warrior," but perhaps we were wrong. At all events, the interpretation of "P" was clearly set forth by another document, which explained that I was entitled to ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 153, Oct. 3, 1917 • Various

... service, had followed the diamonds, had followed in the wake of a handsome fortune, leaving the after generations impoverished. If their money is taken from them, some families are left poor indeed, and to this class the Dares belonged. It is curious to notice the occasional real equality underlying the apparent inequality of different conditions of life. The unconscious poverty, and even bankruptcy, of some rich people in every kind of wealth except ...
— The Danvers Jewels, and Sir Charles Danvers • Mary Cholmondeley

... as is hurted,' explained one of the bystanders, with that wonderful openness and way of making the worst of everything that is found in that class. ...
— Zoe • Evelyn Whitaker

... survived. It has been truly said that, at the epoch of the Reformation, there lay concealed, in many parts of Europe, persons who entertained the most virulent enmity against Christianity. In this pernicious class were many Aristotelians, such as Pomponatius; many philosophers and wits, such as Bodin, Rabelais, Montaigne; many Italians, ...
— History of the Conflict Between Religion and Science • John William Draper

... "it may be that in your heart you class me with those false lovers whose devotion cannot stand the test of absence. If you do, you wrong me; and were it not for fear of offending you, I would beseech you to come with me, for my life can only be happy when passed with you. As for your reception at the ...
— The Arabian Nights Entertainments • Andrew Lang.

... demanding promotion. You, as you have stated, were absent in Portugal on some state mission. I sought the Duke de Lerma. I implored him to give me some post, anywhere—I recked not beneath what sky, in the vast empire of Spain—in which, removed from the prejudices of birth and of class, and provided with other means, less precarious than those that depend on the sword, I might make Beatriz my wife. The polished duke was more inexorable than the stern hidalgo. I flew to Beatriz; I told her I had nothing ...
— Calderon The Courtier - A Tale • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... and others of the same class were really terrified, and took on dreadfully, predicting all sorts of dreadful things, and declared that they were fools to have taken this voyage, and that ...
— The Hilltop Boys on Lost Island • Cyril Burleigh

... therefore be easily achieved if your Majesty, in the exercise of his almost superhuman wisdom, will but add a schedule to the Finance Act in which there shall be set down fifteen or twenty classes of writers, with their price per thousand words, and a compulsory registration of each class, enforced by the ...
— First and Last • H. Belloc

... away at us. You get me to a house, take care of my wounds, and hold the fort alone in the night till help comes. Not only that, but you drive my enemy away. Later, you bring me home, and nurse me like I was a long-lost brother. What I did for you ain't in the same class with what you've done ...
— A Texas Ranger • William MacLeod Raine

... of fruits, dry and liquid, he placed in the first rank, calling them Pentacosiomedimni; those that could keep an horse, or were worth three hundred measures, were named Hippada Teluntes, and made the second class; the Zeugitae, that had two hundred measures, were in the third; and all the others were called Thetes, who were not admitted to any office, but could come to the assembly, and act as jurors; which at first seemed nothing, but afterwards was ...
— Plutarch's Lives • A.H. Clough

... he receive compensation, although the law may profess to punish cruelty to him as to other animals. Now it has never been regarded as immoral, by those who admit the right of self-defence, for a prisoner of war to effect his escape by slaying his guard. All this, I know, will horrify a certain class of our divines and politicians. But let them be patient. I am not laying down a doctrine, but stating facts, which they may disprove if they can. Let them remember, that all the slavery which they delight to find in the Bible was the slavery of white men, and that ...
— A Letter to the Hon. Samuel Eliot, Representative in Congress From the City of Boston, In Reply to His Apology For Voting For the Fugitive Slave Bill. • Hancock

... Clara, for indeed marriage had assuaged a little the tediousness of some of her mannerisms, even if it had taken away from her charm. He was disgusted more comprehensively by the tradition, universal in his class and in most classes, according to which relatives could not be formally polite to one another. He obeyed the tradition as slavishly as anyone, but often said to himself that he would violate the sacred rule if only he could count on a suitable response; he knew that he ...
— Clayhanger • Arnold Bennett

... inscription was found on the inner side of the same carved in German Gothic characters: 'Illtre. y Esdo. Varon Dn. Cristobal Colon,' and in the said box human remains which on examination by the licentiate of equal class Jose de Jesus Brenes are found to be: A femur deteriorated in the upper part of the neck, between the great trochanter and its head. A fibula in its natural state. A radius also complete. The os sacrum ...
— Santo Domingo - A Country With A Future • Otto Schoenrich

... plan, to which the King had agreed; she thought the hope of obtaining ecclesiastical favours would secure the clergy of the second order, and that M. Necker was sure to have the same degree of influence over the lawyers, and other people of that class comprised in the Tiers Dat. The Comte d'Artois, holding the contrary opinion, presented a memorial in the names of himself and several princes of the blood to the King against the double representation. ...
— Marguerite de Navarre - Memoirs of Marguerite de Valois Queen of Navarre • Marguerite de Navarre

... of criminals were established in 1826, when the new barracks for prisoners at Hobart Town were finished. The first class were allowed to sleep out of barracks, and to work for themselves on Saturday; the second had only the last-named indulgence; the third were only allowed Saturday afternoon; the fourth and fifth were "refractory and disorderly ...
— For the Term of His Natural Life • Marcus Clarke

... expected here as to Mr. Carlyle's manner as a lecturer. In so far as his mere manner is concerned, I can scarcely bestow on him a word of commendation. There is something in his manner which, if I may use a rather quaint term, must seem very uncouth to London audiences of the most respectable class, accustomed as they are to the polished deportment[A] which is usually exhibited in Willis's or the Hanover Rooms. When he enters the room, and proceeds to the sort of rostrum whence he delivers his lectures, he is, according to the ...
— On the Choice of Books • Thomas Carlyle

... you please," he said quietly. "Are they of the same sort, the same class, of rings as those in ...
— The Orange-Yellow Diamond • J. S. Fletcher

... the primitive religion has so affected the common class of Buddhist beliefs that it is not incorrect to speak of the Japanese "idea of self." It is only necessary that the popular Shinto idea be simultaneously considered. In Shinto we have the plainest possible evidence ...
— Kokoro - Japanese Inner Life Hints • Lafcadio Hearn

... As the friend of Mr. Nicholas Temple, as the relation and (may I say?) benefactor of this poor lady here, it is fitting that you should know certain things. I will not weary you with the reasons and events which led to my coming from Europe to New Orleans, except to say that I, like all of my class who have escaped the horrors of the Revolution, am a wanderer, and grateful to Monsieur de St. Gre for the shelter he gives me. His letter reached me in England, and I arrived ...
— The Crossing • Winston Churchill

... among the peasants are the decreasing stocks of grain in the village storehouses, the deterioration of buildings, the exhaustion of the soil, the destruction of forests, the arrears of taxes, and the struggle of the people to migrate. In almost every village the penniless class is constantly growing, and, at the same time, there is a frightfully rapid increase in the number of families that are passing from comparative prosperity to poverty, and from poverty to a condition in which they have ...
— McClure's Magazine, Vol. 31, No. 1, May 1908 • Various

... he could find from the moment he left college. He inherited his father's good looks, but his mother's predilections apparently; for he set out in life with the determination to be Parisian amongst Parisians—of a certain class, be it understood; and having some talent for drawing, as indeed he had for most things, he used it as a pretext, announced that he intended to be an artist, and furnishing a room in the Quartier Latin, with an easel and a pipe, he began the ...
— My Little Lady • Eleanor Frances Poynter

... at least one year in the age of the applicant. For a boy to enter college in a half-fitted condition is simply to make a false start in life, for he is only too likely to become discouraged, and either to drag along at the foot of the class or to lose his place in it altogether. Hawthorne may have felt that the end of earthly affairs was close upon him, and wished to see his son started on the right road before that came; but Emerson also had an interest in having ...
— The Life and Genius of Nathaniel Hawthorne • Frank Preston Stearns

... of persons of fidelity, gave throughout all the dreadful convulsions of the Revolution proofs of the greatest prudence and self-devotion. The same cannot be said of the antechambers. With the exception of three or four, all the servants of that class were outrageous Jacobins; and I saw on those occasions the necessity of composing the private household of princes of persons completely separated from the ...
— Marguerite de Navarre - Memoirs of Marguerite de Valois Queen of Navarre • Marguerite de Navarre

... getting lost, Sam; we are lost, no two ways about it. We've got to keep our eyes open and our wits about us, or we'll be getting into a first-class mess." ...
— The Rover Boys In The Mountains • Arthur M. Winfield

... full of fine possibility and guaranteed by a fine comradeship—owning a land not of flattery and favouritism, but of freedom and manhood. This saving ideal has been often obscured by our sundering class names. This is why we would substitute as common for all the fine ...
— Principles of Freedom • Terence J. MacSwiney

... who set true landmarks and hold to them, knowing their measure; the devil interfering, I observe, lately in his own way, with the Geometry of Yorkshire, where the landed proprietors, [Footnote: I mean no accusation against any class; probably the one-fielded statesman is more eager for his little gain of fifty yards of grass than the squire for his bite and sup out of the gypsy's part of the roadside. But it is notable enough to the passing traveller, to find himself shut into a narrow road between high stone dykes which ...
— Mornings in Florence • John Ruskin

... the ruling classes seek to abrogate the treaties and defy foreign powers? The Daimios are not ignorant of the prowess and resources of the country against which they particularly array themselves: they are a well-informed and astute class, and cannot fall to see that feudalism and commerce are antagonistic—that free intercourse with foreigners is incompatible with the existence of the present form of government: and therefore many of them would fain revert to the conservative policy of isolation. ...
— Continental Monthly, Vol. 4, No 3, September 1863 - Devoted to Literature and National Policy • Various

... your family, and know that it is reciprocal; I therefore cannot help thinking that you would mutually be lost to each other. The friends, too, which you have here, are of the highest and most desirable class. To quit them, in order to make new friendships in a strange land, in which the generality of its inhabitants at present seem incapable of such virtues as friendship is built upon, seems wild ...
— The Diary and Letters of Madame D'Arblay Volume 3 • Madame D'Arblay

... the Roman burgesses, and the Hellenes and Germans in the Macedonian and Frank kings. The Celtic priesthood and likewise the nobility—although both in a certain sense represented and combined the nation—were yet, on the one hand, incapable of uniting it in consequence of their particular class-interests, and, on the other hand, sufficiently powerful to allow no king and no canton to accomplish the work of union. Attempts at this work were not wanting; they followed, as the cantonal constitution ...
— The History of Rome (Volumes 1-5) • Theodor Mommsen

... I do? I have told him about it time and again. Only the other day when the marshal of the nobility came into the class-room, he made such a face at him as I had never in my life seen before. I dare say it was with the best intentions; But I get reprimanded for permitting radical ideas to be instilled in the minds of ...
— The Inspector-General • Nicolay Gogol

... young Mr. Coppinger receive much encouragement from his own class. Bill Kirby, indeed, undertook to support him and even volunteered to go round with him on his canvassing expeditions, but this was considered by Larry's Committee as being of questionable advantage, even, possibly, affording to the enemy an occasion to blaspheme, and the offer (made, it may ...
— Mount Music • E. Oe. Somerville and Martin Ross

... know not why, is the first of the four Elements. Let us take a more complex instance—his name for Salmon. The salmon is a species of Za or Fish, a particular kind of fish called N, namely, the Squameous river fish. This class ZaN is subdivided into lower classes, and the lower class Salmon is called A, which means the red-fleshed kind of squameous river fish, and so a salmon is a ZaNA. If you wished to state the fact that a salmon swims, you would use the words ZaNA GoF, for Go stands for ...
— The Life and Times of John Wilkins • Patrick A. Wright-Henderson

... England, who, in their zeal, had burned old women because they were guilty of sorcery, had much to say in correcting morals, and removing evil. The duel they considered one of the most odious sins of society; and no doubt it seemed all the more odious to them because it was the sin of an exclusive class who put an estimate upon honour that passed the understanding of men who believed it to be their duty to offer the left cheek after the right had ...
— The Four Canadian Highwaymen • Joseph Edmund Collins

... race of very pretty, delicate, and showy spring flowers, having varieties of nearly every hue, both single and double, but the former class is much preferable. They thrive best in good loamy soil, which has been well manured the year previous to planting. Roots should be obtained and planted—at about 4 in. apart—as soon as possible, the sooner the better, so that the plants will be sturdy and well grown before the very ...
— Little Folks (December 1884) - A Magazine for the Young • Various

... my last about Johnnie's going to school with me now. She is very proud of it, and is always talking about 'Elsie's and my school.' She is twice as smart as the other girls of her age. Miss McCrane has put her into the composition class, where they write compositions on their slates. The first subject was, 'A Kitten;' and John's began, 'She's a dear, little, soft scratching thing, only you'd better not pull her by the tail, but she's real cunning.' All the girls ...
— What Katy Did At School • Susan Coolidge

... not one," was the prompt reply; "we have not been able to learn that he had any acquaintances even, among that class." ...
— The Somnambulist and the Detective - The Murderer and the Fortune Teller • Allan Pinkerton

... plausible enough, but, like more plausible notions on Indian matters, I believe it's a mistake. You'll find when you come to consult the unofficial Briton that our fault, as a class—I speak of the civilian now-is rather to magnify the progress that has been made toward liberal institutions. It is of English origin, such as it is, and the stress of our work since the Mutiny—only thirty years ago—has been in that direction. No, I think you will ...
— Under the Deodars • Rudyard Kipling

... dropped upon my sofa—I felt faint. The man went on, liking to talk as persons of his class do when they have something horrible to tell. She usually rang for the stewardess early, but this morning of course there had been no ring. The stewardess had gone in all the same about eight o'clock and found the cabin empty. ...
— The Patagonia • Henry James

... wild Markmen, Gauls, Thracians, as to Augustine's own heart? What if He were—Augustine said He was—yearning after, enlightening, leading home to Himself, the souls of the poorest, the most brutal, the most sinful?—What if He loved man as man, and not merely one favoured race or one favoured class of minds?.... And in the light of that hypothesis, that strange story of the Cross of Calvary seemed not so impossible after all.... But then, celibacy and asceticism, utterly non-human as they were, what had they to do with the theory ...
— Hypatia - or, New Foes with an Old Face • Charles Kingsley



Words linked to "Class" :   Ascidiaceae, class Charophyceae, Hemimetabola, division Magnoliophyta, Branchiopoda, class Cyanobacteria, commonality, form class, Monocotyledones, Nuda, class Hirudinea, Hominoidea, Schizomycetes, class Aphasmidia, number, biological science, Symphyla, class Chytridiomycetes, woman, third class, Xanthophyceae, upper-middle-class, class Chrysophyceae, yeomanry, class Myxomycetes, class Polyplacophora, subclass Infusoria, subclass Zoomastigina, Sphenopsida, upper-lower-class, sergeant first class, conference, old school, class Cyanophyceae, upper class, Taxopsida, class Reptilia, brotherhood, subclass Anapsida, major form class, Coniferophytina, Exopterygota, tourist class, correspondence course, Taxophytina, age class, Filicinae, class Echinoidea, Reptilia, Dicotyledones, class war, teaching, the three estates, Selachii, Charophyceae, class Filicopsida, Cnidosporidia, class Hepaticae, lecturing, Hemiascomycetes, class Bacillariophyceae, subclass Rosidae, Magnoliophyta, subclass Caryophyllidae, class Taxopsida, taxonomic group, Asteroidea, Sarcodina, subclass Hamamelidae, Phasmidia, Cyclosporeae, Cycadopsida, Dibranchia, center, colloquialism, womanhood, catalog, low-class, class Cycadopsida, class Diatomophyceae, Zygomycetes, class Basidiomycetes, discussion section, class Pyrenomycetes, Equisetatae, subclass Opisthobranchia, subclass Selachii, class Crinoidea, Gnetophytina, subclass Homobasidiomycetes, class Gastromycetes, Dilleniidae, estate of the realm, word class, subclass Asteridae, superfamily Hominoidea, Cyanophyceae, Prototheria, Lamellibranchia, second-class, gathering, class Cryptophyceae, class Musci, class Thaliacea, Tardigrada, home study, underworld, subclass Malacostraca, Sporozoa, subclass Holocephali, class Zygomycetes, subclass Ophiurida, class Ginkgophytina, Psilotatae, firing line, class struggle, section, socio-economic class, Caryophyllidae, class feeling, Rhodophyceae, subdivision Taxophytina, market, course, Archaeornithes, class Heterokontae, Cryptophyceae, Ulvophyceae, adult education, Lepidosauria, amphibia, economy class, Chlorophyceae, workshop, phylum, Turbellaria, first-class, Telosporidia, class Euglenophyceae, orientation course, Bryopsida, assort, class Flagellata, class Chondrichthyes, Scaphopoda, Chrysophyceae, subclass Archaeornithes, Pteridospermopsida, Deuteromycetes, subclass Rhizopoda, ninja, Holocephali, shop, class Pteridospermopsida, Tiliomycetes, Rosidae, Archosauria, Myriapoda, subclass Dibranchia, class-conscious, Coniferopsida, class Larvacea, pedagogy, ruling class, class Archiannelida, Ginkgophytina, class Chlorophyceae, class Psilopsida, subclass Exopterygota, Ciliata, taxon, class Liliopsida, course of lectures, stereotype, Hydrozoa, Arecidae, Heterobasidiomycetes, declension, class Turbellaria, subdivision Gnetophytina, class Cestoda, class Ascidiaceae, art class, proletariat, seminar, subclass Synapsida, Teleostei, paradigm, Ostracoda, class Equisetatae, Crustacea, class Hydrozoa, Placodermi, Lycopodiate, class Sporozoa, craft, subclass Branchiopoda, dichotomise, immigrant class, subclass Copepoda, world-class, Chondrichthyes, Cephalopoda, class Ginkgopsida, world, Gymnospermae, Asteridae, Euascomycetes, class Coniferopsida, syntactic category, class Hyalospongiae, subclass Ostracoda, class Hymenomycetes, life class, booboisie, class Polychaeta, class Mammalia, Ophiurida, sex, subclass Euascomycetes, subclass Dibranchiata, domain, Alismatidae, grade, elegance, Diatomophyceae, Elasmobranchii, commons, 1st-class mail, subclass Pantotheria, class Gastropoda, labor, Holothuroidea, recitation, class Chilopoda, Rhizopoda, Cestoda, Cycadophytina, class warfare, Insecta, subclass Entomostraca, superclass Gnathostomata, stratum, compare, cabin class, class Merostomata, Crinoidea, Thaliacea, class Trematoda, Hymenomycetes, class Nuda, Onychophora, Anthozoa, class Deuteromycetes, class Pelecypoda, family, didactics, violin family, Bivalvia, count, middle-class, subclass Crossopterygii, Basidiomycetes, class Sphenopsida, class Holothuroidea, reclassify, Scyphozoa, first-class honours degree, class Pinopsida, society, class Bivalvia, Lycopodineae, class Osteichthyes, class Ulvophyceae, educational activity, class Ophiuroidea, class Xanthophyceae, Euryalida, class Rhodophyceae, lesson, class Cyclosporeae, form, class Monocotyledones, peasantry, Larvacea, class Dicotyledones, subdivision Ginkgophytina, class Tiliomycetes, Trematoda, superclass Myriapoda, superclass Agnatha, Infusoria, Eutheria, Filicopsida, Copepoda, class Pauropoda, subclass Metatheria, open-class word, class Hepaticopsida, Metatheria, class Gymnospermae, Homobasidiomycetes, social class, Flagellata, class list, class Scyphozoa, Dicotyledonae, class-action suit, freshman class, Polyplacophora, master class, people, Phaeophyceae, Pinophytina, subclass Actinopoda, league, Ciliophora, orientation, Pauropoda, Magnoliopsida, lower-class, Crossopterygii, unitise, subclass Acnidosporidia, Hyalospongiae, extension course, Zoomastigina, subclass Cnidosporidia, brass family, class Symphyla, class Psilotatae, subdivision Coniferophytina, Gasteromycetes, grammatical category, class Plectomycetes, working class, accumulation, commonalty, class Gasteromycetes, first class, subclass Eutheria, class Cephalopoda, propaedeutics, Plectomycetes, Ginkgopsida, subclass Lepidosauria, class Eumycetes, Agnatha, Euglenophyceae, dichotomize, class Ascomycetes, Anapsida, class Bryopsida, Discomycetes, class Anthoceropsida, closed-class word, third-class mail, Pyrenomycetes, Osteichthyes, 1st class, Dibranchiata, subclass Arecidae, Mammalia, subdivision Cycadophytina, Anthoceropsida, refresher course, Phytomastigina, class Lycopodineae, Acrasiomycetes, Hirudinea, required course, Entomostraca



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