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Eruptive   Listen
adjective
Eruptive  adj.  
1.
Breaking out or bursting forth. "The sudden glance Appears far south eruptive through the cloud."
2.
(Med.) Attended with eruption or efflorescence, or producing it; as, an eruptive fever.
3.
(Geol.) Produced by eruption; as, eruptive rocks, such as the igneous or volcanic.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Eruptive" Quotes from Famous Books



... certain preventive of the common eruptive Scarlatina, it is not as certain to prevent the malignant form. Though it renders the latter much more mild, the Merc. Cor. is necessary to ward it off entirely, or so modify as to divest it of the ...
— An Epitome of Homeopathic Healing Art - Containing the New Discoveries and Improvements to the Present Time • B. L. Hill

... twenty-five to two hundred feet high. Outside of this last-mentioned zone, we have several rings of volcanic mountains with intervening valleys, and many active craters at the summit of mountains; while on the mountain-sides lie numerous masses of rock-salt, thrown from below by eruptive action, glistening in the brilliant volcanic light, and slowly deliquescing. This zone of mountains and valleys is from ten to twenty miles in width, and whilst in the main its mountains are not more than from half a mile to a mile high, it contains peaks of five or six miles in height, ...
— A Strange Discovery • Charles Romyn Dake

... savagely in German and broken English, according to the nationality with which their affairs happened to get entangled. Even the colored chef de cuisine, a muscular mulatto, with a beard of a rash disposition, coming out on wrong parts of his face in little eruptive pustules of black wool, sported his lines out of the galley-airholes, and his porgies were simmering in the pan while their memories were yet green in the submarine parishes from which they came. Have these finny creatures ...
— Atlantic Monthly Volume 7, No. 40, February, 1861 • Various

... divided into two classes. We have first those which are comparatively quiescent, and in form somewhat resemble the clouds which float in our earth's atmosphere. The second class of prominences are best described as eruptive. They are, in fact, thrown up from the chromosphere like gigantic jets of incandescent material. These two classes of objects differ not only in appearance but also in the gases of which they are composed. The cloud-like ...
— The Story of the Heavens • Robert Stawell Ball

... had not read Burckhardt, makes the same remark. The many eruptive centres in the limestones of Syria and Palestine were discovered chiefly by my late friend, the loved and lamented Charles F. Tyrwhitt-Drake. It would be interesting to ascertain the relation which they bear to tile great lines of vulcanism in the ...
— The Land of Midian, Vol. 1 • Richard Burton

... Pox, and Smallpox*, on account of the eruptions of the skin which attend them, are classed as eruptive diseases. As the eruptions heal, scales separate from the skin, and these are supposed to be the chief means of spreading the germs. Attention must be given to the destruction of these scales by burning or thoroughly disinfecting all objects, such as clothing, bedding, ...
— Physiology and Hygiene for Secondary Schools • Francis M. Walters, A.M.

... "tame mob;" they were absconders from different tribes, and separated from their chiefs. They often entered the town and obtained bread, tobacco, and even rum from the inhabitants. Their importunity was troublesome, and their appearance offensive: the eruptive disease which covered their skin, especially on the legs, most exposed to the heat of their fires, added to their squalor and wretchedness. They are thus described by the Rev. Mr. Horton: he saw them at Pittwater, crouching round their fires, ...
— The History of Tasmania , Volume II (of 2) • John West

... (Bland Sutton). Odontomas resemble teeth in so far that during their development they remain hidden below the mucous membrane and give no evidence of their existence. There then succeeds, usually between the twentieth and twenty-fifth years, an eruptive stage, which is often attended with suppuration, and this may be the means of drawing attention to the tumour. Following Bland Sutton, several varieties of odontoma may be distinguished according to the part of the tooth-germ concerned in ...
— Manual of Surgery - Volume First: General Surgery. Sixth Edition. • Alexis Thomson and Alexander Miles

... the carpet by the table, looked up towards us, and mewed piteously. I never had seen so wretched a looking creature. It was dreadfully attenuated, being little more than skin and bone, and was sorely afflicted with an eruptive malady. And here I may as well relate the history of this cat previous to our arrival which I subsequently learned by bits and snatches. It had belonged to a previous vicar of Llangollen, and had been left behind at his departure. His successor ...
— Wild Wales - Its People, Language and Scenery • George Borrow

... blamed for never evincing the slightest desire to hear them. Haydn had, indeed, a glimmering of the new idea—perhaps more than a glimmering; but, on the whole, he was still in leading strings, and dared not follow the gleam. It is not surprising. He was not one of Nature's giant eruptive forces, like Beethoven. His declared object always was to please his patrons; and consider who his patrons were. We may be sure that the "discords" of a Beethoven suddenly blared forth would have scared Count Morzin and all his pigtail court. Haydn was supposed to write the same kind ...
— Haydn • John F. Runciman

... from different sources. Hundreds of cases of this kind could be cited, but I will mention only a few; among others the Humboldt, the Bassick, and the Bull Domingo, near Rosita and Silver Cliff, Colorado. These are veins contained in the same sheet of eruptive rock, but the ores are as different as possible. The Humboldt is a narrow fissure carrying a thin ore streak of high grade, consisting of sulphides of silver, antimony, arsenic, and copper; the Bassick is a great conglomerate vein containing tellurides of silver and gold, ...
— Scientific American Supplement, No. 446, July 19, 1884 • Various

... nervous system may cause convulsions in the child, as teething, indigestible food, worms, dropsy of the brain, hereditary constitution, or they may be the accompanying symptom in nearly all the {309} acute diseases of children, or when the eruption is suppressed in eruptive diseases. ...
— Searchlights on Health: Light on Dark Corners • B.G. Jefferis

... and inaccessible; Fissure and rent, where the intrusive dike's Creative and destructive agency Leaves many an enduring monument Of metamorphic and eruptive power; Of molten deluge, and volcanic flood; Fracture and break, the silent stories tell Of dire convulsion in the ages past; Of subterranean catastrophe, And cataclysm of ...
— Mountain idylls, and Other Poems • Alfred Castner King

... thou our island. Let it be answered the questioner, with no discourteous adjectives, Thou fool! To come to such heights of popular discrimination and political ardour the people would have to be vivified to a pitch little short of eruptive: it would be Boreas blowing AEtna inside them; and we should have impulse at work in the country, and immense importance attaching to a man's whether he will or he won't—enough to womanize him. We should be all but having Parliament for a sample of our choicest rather than ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... its practicability, nor could we believe that it rises 3,243 feet above its western base, Las Canadas. The summit, not including the terminal Pilon—a comparatively dwarf cone [Footnote: There is a very bad sketch of the Pike in Mr. Scrope's popular work on Volcanoes (p. 5); the eruptive chimney is far too regularly conical.]—is ribboned with clinker, and streaked at this season with snow-lines radiating, like wheel-spokes from a common centre. Here and there hang, at an impossible angle, black lava-streams which were powerless to reach the plain: they ...
— To the Gold Coast for Gold - A Personal Narrative in Two Volumes.—Vol. I • Richard F. Burton

... end, more particularly in the vicinity of West Point and North Head, was just about finished. West Point proved to be an area of gabbro, a coarse-grained eruptive rock representative of basic rocks, while North Head was composed of basic agglomerate, and ...
— The Home of the Blizzard • Douglas Mawson

... eruptive fever, caused by a bacillus and fever, with aching of the limbs, in from nine to twelve germ peculiar to the disease. It commences with chills days ...
— The Royal Road to Health • Chas. A. Tyrrell

... has ever been the theatre of igneous phenomena, and the three little islands of Thera, Therasia, and Aspronisi, which shut in the Bay of Santorin, are built up chiefly of volcanic materials.[246] In 1573 an eruptive cone suddenly appeared; in 1707 the inhabitants of Santorin saw rise up a short distance from their shores a rock that increased in size for several days and then suddenly split up. This splitting up was succeeded by a great eruption of incandescent ...
— Manners and Monuments of Prehistoric Peoples • The Marquis de Nadaillac

... The eruptive matter of volcanoes, forbidding as is its aspect, does not refuse nutriment to the woods. The refractory lava of Etna, it is true, remains long barren, and that of the great eruption of 1669 is still almost wholly ...
— The Earth as Modified by Human Action • George P. Marsh

... portion of a butyraceous essential oil separates. Infusions made from the fresh flowers are gently laxative and aperient; when dry, they are said to promote chiefly the cuticular excretion, and to be particularly serviceable in erysipetalous and eruptive ...
— The Botanist's Companion, Vol. II • William Salisbury

... eruptive cadaver, the head, tumultuous, enormous, encircled by a disordered crown of thorns, hung down lifeless. One lacklustre eye half opened as a shudder of terror or of sorrow traversed the expiring figure. The face was furrowed, the brow seamed, the ...
— La-bas • J. K. Huysmans

... small quantities on the earth. A fact which may have a significance which we cannot at present see is that the emanation from radium gradually and spontaneously changes into helium, an alchemistical feat of nature that has opened many curious vistas to speculative thinkers. The eruptive prominences, which do not spread horizontally like the others, but ascend with marvelous velocity to elevations of half a million miles or more, are apparently composed largely of metallic vapors — ...
— Curiosities of the Sky • Garrett Serviss

... pestilence. Brasseur translates this "la maladie syphilitique." The vowel is long, [c]haac. It is a word applied to any eruptive disease, to the whole class of exanthemata. From the symptoms, I am inclined to believe that it was an epidemic of malignant measles, a disease very fatal to the natives of ...
— The Annals of the Cakchiquels • Daniel G. Brinton

... thousand. Not bad repartee for a barbarian! In return for his consideration, I must admit that he was the best dressed Moro we saw in Bongao. On the day in question he wore a suit of gray drill, made with the conventional tight trousers and vest-like coat, broken out at regular intervals in an eruptive fever of gorgeously coloured embroidery. A fez topped off this costume and added to its picturesqueness, while clumsy tan shoes of undeniable American make well-nigh ruined ...
— A Woman's Journey through the Philippines - On a Cable Ship that Linked Together the Strange Lands Seen En Route • Florence Kimball Russel

... the propriety of insisting that all the laws of the eruptive fevers must necessarily hold true of this peculiar disease of puerperal women. If there were any such propriety, the laws of the eruptive fevers must at least be stated correctly. It is not true, for instance, as Dr. Meigs states, that contagion is ...
— Medical Essays • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.

... the hoe; or a farmer may set apart a small field for an annual crop, keeping up the land by the application of three pecks of plaster per acre each year. It is very popular as human food, and always made into pancakes. The free use of it is said to promote eruptive diseases. The India buckwheat is more productive, but of poorer quality. The bran is the best article known to mix with horse-manure and spade into radish beds, to promote growth and ...
— Soil Culture • J. H. Walden

... closer to her husband, and was pressed, as her lips touched his forehead, and as the pair of them, gazing at the empty road among the lilacs, saw it filled with the eruptive vision of Mountain Lad, majestic and mighty, the gnat-creature of a man upon his back absurdly small; his eyes wild and desirous, with the blue sheen that surfaces the eyes of stallions; his mouth, flecked with the froth and fret of high ...
— The Little Lady of the Big House • Jack London

... much is added, the presence is so much more vascular and human, and the whole page so saturated with faith and love and democracy, that even the great Scotchman is overborne. Whitman, too, radiates belief, while at the core of Carlyle's utterances is despair. The style here is eruptive and complex, or what Jeremy Taylor calls agglomerative, and puts the Addisonian models utterly to rout,—a style such as only the largest and most Titanic workman could effectively use. A sensitive lady of ...
— Birds and Poets • John Burroughs

... which exists between the formation of the granular rocks composing the lava currents ejected from active volcanoes, and those endogenous masses of granite, porphyry, and serpentine, which, issuing from the interior of the earth, have broken, as eruptive rocks, through the secondary strata, and modified them by contact, either in rendering them harder by the introduction of silex, or reducing them into dolomite, or, finally, by inducing within them the formation of crystals ...
— COSMOS: A Sketch of the Physical Description of the Universe, Vol. 1 • Alexander von Humboldt

... space, and rapidly ends in suppuration, which spreads to the surrounding cellular tissue. It is most common in children during the first and second years, and the patient may be convalescent after one of the eruptive fevers attended with inflammation of the bucco-pharyngeal mucous membrane—such as scarlet fever, measles, or chicken-pox—or may suffer from nasal excoriations or coryza. In some cases the irritation of dentition is the ...
— Manual of Surgery Volume Second: Extremities—Head—Neck. Sixth Edition. • Alexander Miles

... Alaska has its volcanoes, the Philippines are subject to both forms of convulsion, and in Hawaii we possess the most spectacular volcano of the earth, while the earthquake is its common attendant. But in the older United States the volcano contents itself with an occasional puff of smoke, and eruptive phenomena are confined to the ...
— The San Francisco Calamity • Various

... classes: (1) Aqueous rocks. These have been formed by deposition of sedimentary material, layer by layer, on the bottoms of ancient oceans, lakes, and rivers, from which they have gradually been raised, to form dry land. (2) Eruptive or volcanic rocks. These have been forced, as hot fluids, through rents and fissures from the interior of the earth. (3) Metamorphic rocks. These, by the combined action of heat, pressure, water, and chemical agents, have ...
— An Introduction to Chemical Science • R.P. Williams

... walked back, talking about the rushing and trampling noise of the preceding night, Drew having heard something of it from a distance and attributed it rightly to a sudden panic amongst the animals startled into headlong flight by the eruptive action of the volcano. ...
— Fire Island - Being the Adventures of Uncertain Naturalists in an Unknown Track • G. Manville Fenn

... which is a tertiary accumulation of the pliocene age;" and that it is found most abundantly "in quartz-ore, vein-stones and traverse altered Silurian slates, chiefly lower Silurian, frequently near their junction with eruptive rocks." ...
— Principles Of Political Economy • William Roscher

... Round Top, attaining an elevation of 10,430 feet, and the adjacent peaks, were the sources of the enormous flows which covered a large part of Eldorado County. Still another volcanic complex with many eruptive vents is that situated in the western part of Alpine County, near Markleeville, which culminates in Highland Peak and Raymond Peak, the former almost reaching 11,000 feet. The total thickness of the volcanic flows in this locality is as much ...
— The Lake of the Sky • George Wharton James

... customary manner. This yields a moderately firm and clear soap, which may be readily used by application to parts affected with eruptions at night, mixed with a little water, and carefully washed off the following morning. This soap has lately been much used for eruptive disorders, particularly on the Continent, and with varying degrees of success. It is thought that the efficient element in its composition is a rather less impure hydrocarburet than that known in Paris under the name huile ...
— The Art of Perfumery - And Methods of Obtaining the Odors of Plants • G. W. Septimus Piesse



Words linked to "Eruptive" :   active, aqueous, erupt, eruption



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