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verb
Go  v. t.  (past went; past part. gone; pres. part. going)  
1.
To take, as a share in an enterprise; to undertake or become responsible for; to bear a part in. "They to go equal shares in the booty."
2.
To bet or wager; as, I'll go you a shilling. (Colloq.)
To go halves, to share with another equally.
To go it, to behave in a wild manner; to be uproarious; to carry on; also, to proceed; to make progress. (Colloq.)
To go it alone (Card Playing), to play a hand without the assistance of one's partner.
To go it blind.
(a)
To act in a rash, reckless, or headlong manner. (Slang)
(b)
(Card Playing) To bet without having examined the cards.
To go one's way, to set forth; to depart.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Go" Quotes from Famous Books



... houses, and in a moment came to a standstill in the midst of a straggling village. The young conductor still slept on, his head fallen so far on his shoulder that his breathing was difficult. The motorman, getting no signal to go on, looked back through the window, putting his face close to the glass to see, for it had grown dusky outside and the electric lights were not yet turned on. After a look at the sleeping man he glanced apprehensively at the two ...
— The Squirrel-Cage • Dorothy Canfield

... off so abruptly in your last, and tell me you must go and dress for the Play? If you loved as I do, you would find no more Company in a Crowd, than I have ...
— The Spectator, Volumes 1, 2 and 3 - With Translations and Index for the Series • Joseph Addison and Richard Steele

... England. Well, in 1917 the Labour party gathered up the reins, and Communism really began. That was long before I can remember, of course, but my father used to date it from then. The only wonder was that things did not go forward more quickly; but I suppose there was a good deal of Tory leaven left. Besides, centuries generally run slower than is expected, especially after beginning with an impulse. But the new order began then; and the Communists ...
— Lord of the World • Robert Hugh Benson

... say you had a letter for me. I'd a good deal rather not have seen you, but since you are here you may as well discharge your commission, and when you've done that you can go.' ...
— Despair's Last Journey • David Christie Murray

... by minute, as their awful length was measured by the crawling hands of the school-clock. He tried sometimes, in mere self-defence, to force himself into an interest in his work, that the time might go the quicker; but the effort was miserably vain. His senses reeled amid the din and rattle of classes where discipline was unknown and intelligence almost indiscoverable. Not seldom his temper got the better even of sick ...
— The Unclassed • George Gissing

... about this cause. They know it well enough, but it doesn't pay to say anything about it. It is much more profitable to play the Pharisee, to pretend an outraged morality, than to go to ...
— Anarchism and Other Essays • Emma Goldman

... I must have misunderstood you when I fancied I heard you say how much you would like to go. I thought you longed for a ...
— Janet's Love and Service • Margaret M Robertson

... construction, a feature over which Neale grew impotently furious, was the law that when a certain section of so many miles had been laid and equipped the Government of the United States would send out expert commissioners, who would go over the line and pass judgment upon the finished work. No two groups of commissioners seemed to agree. These experts, who had their part to play in the bewildering and labyrinthine maze of men's contrary ...
— The U.P. Trail • Zane Grey

... thou hast but an hour to fight; Now the blazoned cross unfolding, on, right onward for the right! On! let all the soul within you for the truth's sake go abroad! Strike! let every nerve and sinew tell on ...
— Poems with Power to Strengthen the Soul • Various

... careless and lazy. Knowing that I can leave her when I like she will continue to behave herself." Persuasion was then tried with his wife and her refusal was almost identical: "If I marry him he will know that I am bound to him and then he may go and fall in love with some other woman. Knowing that I can leave him when I like he ...
— Santo Domingo - A Country With A Future • Otto Schoenrich

... off, and the question of providing for his sons was a very serious one. Horatio, however, solved the question as to his own career. At the Grammar School at Norwich, Nelson said to his brother, "Do, William, write to my father and tell him that I should like to go to sea with Uncle Maurice." Captain Maurice Suckling is said to have heard of Horatio's decision with some surprise, for he said, "What has poor Horatio done, who is so weak, that he, above all the rest, ...
— What to See in England • Gordon Home

... of the police in Montreal have shown that hells of the most atrocious character, and one in imitation of Crockford's, as far as its inferior means would go, have been found out. ...
— Canada and the Canadians, Vol. 2 • Richard Henry Bonnycastle

... however, as their real names were Captain Nicholl, R.F.C., and Lieutenant Reid, R.N. It appeared they intended to jump the train before reaching their destination and have a try for the Dutch border. German trains often go slowly and stop, but as luck would have it this one, as we afterwards heard, refused to do anything of the sort. Whether Captain Nicholl succeeded in getting off I do not know, but Lieutenant Reid, seeing discovery imminent, jumped through the carriage window and broke his ankles. ...
— 'Brother Bosch', an Airman's Escape from Germany • Gerald Featherstone Knight

... April to their usual hunting place, where they found the sea still covered with ice for a considerable extent. Each had a sledge and five dogs, and although the wind blew strongly off shore, they did not hesitate to go on the ice in search of seals, as it seemed firmly attached to the shore, and they observed some Kamtchatdales hunting on it farther up the coast. They discovered some seals at a considerable distance out, and repaired thither to kill them. Already had ...
— The American Quarterly Review, No. 17, March 1831 • Various

... groceries, ironmongery, nay, wine and beer for our people and ourselves. Harry may come back and share all these: there is a nag in the stable for him, a piece of venison on the table, a little ready money to keep his pocket warm, and a coat or two every year. This will go on whilst my mother lives, unless, which is far from improbable, he gets into some quarrel with Madam Esmond. Then, whilst I live he will have the run of the house and all it contains: then, if I die leaving ...
— The Virginians • William Makepeace Thackeray

... made-up story was confirmed by the officer sent on board by the Spanish governor. Being requested to go down below and see the patients, the sight of so many poor fellows in the last stage of that horrid disease—their teeth fallen out, gums ulcerated, bodies full of tumours and sores—was quite sufficient; and hurrying up from the lower deck, as ...
— The Phantom Ship • Frederick Marryat

... go, my Lady Mount Rorke," said Sally, who had already begun to regret her promises, and to consider if she had ...
— Spring Days • George Moore

... old Frenchman came to lodge with us; he had been persecuted under the old regime for being a philosopher; he filled my head with odd crotchets which, more or less, have stuck there ever since. At eighteen I was sent to St. John's College, Cambridge. My father was rich enough to have let me go up in the higher rank of a pensioner, but he had lately grown avaricious; he thought that I was extravagant; he made me a sizar, perhaps to spite me. Then, for the first time, those inequalities ...
— Night and Morning, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... needs be few in number. If the time permits, let the teacher add others. They are designed to be mere surface questions, to secure acquaintanceship with a few of the great facts. In assigning the questions on each book of the Bible let the teacher go over them with the class, seeking their knowledge (or imparting it) as to the chapters in which the answers may be found. If the class has the time and desires a more thorough acquaintance with each book, let each member prepare two "large" ...
— A Bird's-Eye View of the Bible - Second Edition • Frank Nelson Palmer

... for the shepherd are cold ones, when it blows strongly. For then the sheep travel at a great pace, and will not go quietly until the sun comes out of the grey sky of the chilly norther, which perhaps moderates towards noon. But in such weather they do not care to camp at noonday, and instead of spreading they ...
— A Tramp's Notebook • Morley Roberts

... son of Daruka, soon carried him off the field by the help of his steeds. The car had not gone far when that best of warriors regained his senses, and taking up his bow addressed his charioteer, saying, "O son of the Suta tribe, what hast thou done? Why dost thou go leaving the field of battle? This is not the custom of the Vrishni heroes in battle! O son of a Suta, hast thou been bewildered at the sight of a Salwa in that fierce encounter? Or hast thou been disheartened, beholding the fight? ...
— Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa Bk. 3 Pt. 1 • Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa

... "The boy favours thy people." Then he added, patting my head, "When thou art a man, my lad, thou shouldst go and see where thy people came from in Wales. I have been at Wyncote. It is a great house, with wings in the Italian manner, and a fine fountain in the court, and gates which were gilded when Charles II came to see the squire, ...
— Hugh Wynne, Free Quaker • S. Weir Mitchell

... road in South America twenty Indians were killed by jaguars within a lifetime. If a man has presence of mind enough to shout and make a noise and go towards the brute, the latter withdraws. Otherwise he is lost, for even if he escapes with his life, the wounds inflicted by the jaguar's blunt claws and teeth are terrible and dangerous. There are Indians in South America who are said ...
— From Pole to Pole - A Book for Young People • Sven Anders Hedin

... called adaptive, but there are others of a different origin that have reference to the changes which the race has passed through in bygone ages. In fact the great majority of animals do go through metamorphoses (many of them as remarkable, though not so familiar as those of insects), but in many cases they are passed through within the egg and thus escape popular observation. Naturalists who accept the theory of evolution, consider that the development of ...
— The Beauties of Nature - and the Wonders of the World We Live In • Sir John Lubbock

... of a few notorious characters, he did not know who were the individuals engaged in it. Jack was a favourite with both revenue men and smugglers, and the latter knew that, should he by chance learn anything of their proceedings, he would not betray them. He used to go off with them when they went out fishing, sometimes with Tom, and sometimes alone, and soon became a very expert boat sailor. One thing is very certain, that his associates did Jack no good. We know from ...
— Washed Ashore - The Tower of Stormount Bay • W.H.G. Kingston

... to Africa. Did you know it then? But before I went—before—" She was thinking, she was burrowing deep down into the past, stirring the heap of memories that lay like drifted leaves. "They used to go—at least they went once—down to the sea. One night they went to the fishing. And they slept out all night. They slept in the caves. Ah, you know that? You remember ...
— A Spirit in Prison • Robert Hichens

... (Fig. 16), the seat of the Marquis of Salisbury, like so many labyrinths, is not difficult on paper; but both this and the Hampton Court Maze may prove very puzzling to actually thread without knowing the plan. One reason is that one is so apt to go down the same blind alleys over and over again, if one proceeds without method. The maze planned by the desire of the Prince Consort for the Royal Horticultural Society's Gardens at South Kensington was allowed to go to ruin, and ...
— Amusements in Mathematics • Henry Ernest Dudeney

... servant; sir, said Nicia with surprise; No more of this: the name will me suffice; Lucretia we will let remain at ease: What you propose can never truly please; If I must die by getting of a son, 'Tis better far the benefit to shun; Go find some other for your wondrous art; In fact I'm not ...
— The Tales and Novels, Complete • Jean de La Fontaine

... through the springs. The proportion of these two classes, the surface and the ground water, varies greatly, and an intermixture of them is continually going on. Thus on the surface of bare rock or frozen earth all the rain may go away without entering the ground. On very sandy fields the heaviest rainfall may be taken up by the porous earth, so that no streams are found. On such surfaces the present writer has observed that ...
— Outlines of the Earth's History - A Popular Study in Physiography • Nathaniel Southgate Shaler

... way; and maybe there'll be some fun before long, if Cousin Euphemia and the doctor get after Wang. He's been to our church all the time lately, ever since our choir started up; and Cousin Euphemia doesn't like it. I just heard her telling Wang to go out to them as soon ...
— In Blue Creek Canon • Anna Chapin Ray

... with so famous a philosopher, but he aimed at carrying out the design which Democritus had planned and Hippocrates had commended. It is stated that he actually set himself to reproduce the old philosopher's reputed eccentricities of conduct. When he was attacked by a fit of melancholy he would go to the bridge foot at Oxford and shake his sides with laughter to hear the bargemen swearing at one another, just as Democritus used to walk down to the haven at Abdera and pick matter for mirth out of ...
— Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 4, Part 4 - "Bulgaria" to "Calgary" • Various

... have been this respect for the courage of the artillerymen which induced the Confederates to let the few survivors go. But could they have looked into the future and seen these same men and guns at Corinth only fourteen days later, they would probably have dropped every other work and secured them while they had ...
— A Battery at Close Quarters - A Paper Read before the Ohio Commandery of the Loyal Legion, - October 6, 1909 • Henry M. Neil

... would have sounded like a Utopian idea. It is probably one that may not or will not be realized either today or tomorrow. If and when this war is decided in favor of the Allies, it will at once come within the range, and, before long, within the grasp of European statesmanship. [Cheers.] I go back for a moment, if I am not keeping you too long, ["Go on,"] to the peculiar aspects of the actual case upon which I have dwelt, because it seems to me that they ought to make a special appeal to the people of Ireland. Ireland is a loyal country, [cheers,] and she ...
— New York Times Current History: The European War from the Beginning to March 1915, Vol 1, No. 2 - Who Began the War, and Why? • Various

... chooses to talk upon this subject, is very explicit, and from these I had it. It was the same with Mr. Clavering and Colonel Cunning(ham). Now for the Address. I saw all these brouillons and their adherents go by; that starved weasel, Charles Turner, in his coach, grinning and squinting: Wilkes(207) in his; Charles F(ox) and Ossory, laughing in Charles's chariot, a gorge deployee. They were not detained long. The King beheld ...
— George Selwyn: His Letters and His Life • E. S. Roscoe and Helen Clergue

... hear the patent magnate welcome, "it is all right. Stay a moment and talk to this gentleman while I go down to ...
— The Master Mystery • Arthur B. Reeve and John W. Grey

... love and sought to take his rest, He made his choice, upon a virgin's lap; And slyly crept from thence unto her breast, Where still he meant to sport him in his hap; The virgin frowned like Phoebus in a cloud; "Go pack, sir boy, here is no room for such, My breast no wanton foolish boy must shroud." This said, my love did give the wag a touch; Then as the foot that treads the stinging snake Hastes to be gone, for fear what may ensue, ...
— Elizabethan Sonnet Cycles - Phillis - Licia • Thomas Lodge and Giles Fletcher

... I leave Egypt for another land, giving you back your generalship and sheathing the sword that I had hoped to wield in its defence and yours when the last great day of trial by battle comes, as come it will. I tell you that I go to return no more, unless the lady Amada yonder shall summon me back to fight for her and you, promising herself to ...
— The Ancient Allan • H. Rider Haggard

... more than any other of the men who dwell in those parts." Having thus spoken, for that time her gave her in charge to those Ephors who were present, and afterwards he sent her away to Egina, whither she herself desired to go. ...
— The History Of Herodotus - Volume 2 (of 2) • Herodotus

... and scorn. And Calvin imagines that such exhortations, as well as the other means of grace offered to all, are designed, not for the real conversion of those who shall finally perish, but to enhance their guilt, and overwhelm them in the more fearful condemnation. If it were possible to go even one step beyond such doctrines, that step is taken by President Edwards: for he is so far from supposing that God really intends to lead all men into a conformity with his revealed will, that he contends that God possesses another and a secret will by which, ...
— A Theodicy, or, Vindication of the Divine Glory • Albert Taylor Bledsoe

... and in his capacity for detachment. The fact seems to be that the play of his destiny is too great for his fears and too mysterious for his understanding. Were the trump of the Last Judgement to sound suddenly on a working day the musician at his piano would go on with his performance of Beethoven's sonata and the cobbler at his stall stick to his last in undisturbed confidence in the virtues of the leather. And with perfect propriety. For what are we to let ourselves be disturbed by an angel's vengeful ...
— Victory • Joseph Conrad

... Protectorate of Richard Cromwell (that mere puppet-play of Power) that the watch kept on the prisoners in the King's Castle grew for a time much less severe and even lax. Arabella was suffered to go out of her chamber, even at the very hours that the Prisoner above was wandering to and fro. The guards did not hinder their meeting; and, says Colonel Ferdinando Glover, one day to his daughter, "I ...
— The Strange Adventures of Captain Dangerous, Vol. 1 of 3 • George Augustus Sala

... partner wanted to move on, so I stayed. Stayed and began to build for the next winter. And I've been working at it ever since, making little things like chairs and tables and shelves, and fixing up game heads whenever I got an extra good one. And maybe two or three times a year I'd go out. Get restless, you know. I'm not really a hermit by nature. Lord, the things I've packed in here from the outside! Books—I hired a whole pack train at Ashcroft once to bring in just books; they thought I was crazy, I guess. I've quit this place once or twice, but I always ...
— North of Fifty-Three • Bertrand W. Sinclair

... for sitting and being sad. Domini, I don't want to tell you about the Trappists, their life—only about myself, why I was as I was, how I came to change. For years I was not unhappy at El-Largani. When my time of novitiate was over I took the eternal vows without hesitation. Many novices go out again into the world. It never occurred to me to do so. I scarcely ever felt a stirring of worldly desire. I scarcely ever had one of those agonising struggles which many people probably attribute to monks. I was contented nearly always. Now and then ...
— The Garden Of Allah • Robert Hichens

... But I will go by-and-bye more fully into matters of this kind. At present it is necessary that I should still pursue the career of Bracciolini,—or rather so much of it as is absolutely needed, in order that the reader may see how curiously ...
— Tacitus and Bracciolini - The Annals Forged in the XVth Century • John Wilson Ross

... had confidence in his own resources, and in the virtue of the commission under which he acted. He relied, too, on the habitual loyalty of the Spaniards; and, after mature deliberation, he determined to go forward, and trust to events for accomplishing the objects ...
— History Of The Conquest Of Peru • William Hickling Prescott

... charm, which, if she would use according to directions, would give her the most beautiful visions. These directions were for her first to destroy my letter by burning it, next to take in her hand the packet I was careful to enclose, swallow the powder accompanying it, and go to bed. The powder was a deadly dose of poison and the packet was, as you know, a forged confession falsely criminating Henry Clavering. Enclosing all these in an envelope in the corner of which I had marked a cross, I directed ...
— The Leavenworth Case • Anna Katharine Green

... males and two females in this crowd, and only one young one." He set Mike and Mitzi off his lap and got to his feet. "I'll go start dinner now. While I'm doing that, you can look at the stuff they ...
— Little Fuzzy • Henry Beam Piper

... steaming toward a mass of shadows that, like iron gates, seem shut against us. A group of fellow-voyagers gathers on the forward deck, resolved to sit up and ascertain whether we really manage to squeeze through some crevice, or back out at last and go around the block. I grow drowsy and think fondly of ...
— Over the Rocky Mountains to Alaska • Charles Warren Stoddard

... as I do that the two go together. We've seen enough of that even in our day. What broke up Mr. Gresham's Ministry? If he had stayed away people might have thought that he was reading blue-books, or calculating coinage, or preparing a speech. That would have been much better. But he comes in and sits for half-an-hour ...
— The Prime Minister • Anthony Trollope

... the pressure would swing her round till once more she looked northward. Even on the return journey, in 1906, it was the same—as if the ship realized she had not accomplished her purpose and wanted to go back. The sailors noticed it, and used to talk about it. They said the Roosevelt was not satisfied, that she knew she had not done ...
— The North Pole - Its Discovery in 1909 under the auspices of the Peary Arctic Club • Robert E. Peary

... following up his attack, he produced from his neck a small locket (which had been given him by a Dutch lady at the Brill), and begged Miss Catherine to wear it for his sake, and chucked her under the chin and called her his little rosebud, it was pretty clear how things would go: anybody who could see the expression of Mr. Brock's countenance at this event might judge of the progress ...
— Catherine: A Story • William Makepeace Thackeray

... on his feet, shouting at the startled Map Control officer. "Get me Martinson down here, and fast. Call the port on a scrambled line and tell them to stand by with a ship on emergency call, with a crack interceptor pilot ready to go. Then get me the plotted orbits of every eccentric asteroid that's crossed Mars' orbit in the last two months. And double-A security on everything ... we don't want to let ...
— Gold in the Sky • Alan Edward Nourse

... 'Giglio may go to the tailor's, and order the bills to be sent in to Glumboso to pay. Confound him! I mean bless his dear heart. He need want for nothing; give him a couple of guineas for pocket-money, my dear; and you may as well order yourself bracelets ...
— The Rose and the Ring • William Makepeace Thackeray

... experiments on the action of gypsum in promoting nitrification. The reason of its favourable action is probably because it neutralises the alkalinity of nitrifying solutions. It thus permits the process to go on in unfavourable conditions. Where, therefore, too great alkalinity exists for the maximum development of nitrification, the best specific will be found to be gypsum.[115] The practical value of gypsum as an ...
— Manures and the principles of manuring • Charles Morton Aikman

... the ascendancy, seemed to offer a favourable opportunity to the royalists, with whose chiefs Sir Edward was on terms of confidential intercourse; and to assist them in their objects by an exploit which should strike terror into the republicans, he proposed to go into Brest with his frigates, and destroy the dismantled fleet. He thought it probable that he should succeed, and urged that the greatness of the object might warrant an attempt in which nothing was to be risked but a few frigates. The conception was in the highest degree daring, but there is ...
— The Life of Admiral Viscount Exmouth • Edward Osler

... this knowledge can be attained only by Revelation: and he that would attain to it even from Revelation, must not pass over any one word as insignificant, for every word is purified like silver: neither must he add to Revelation, or he will be sure to go astray."—From the Appendix (pp. 46-7) to a Sermon by Dr. M'Caul, on The Eternal Sonship of the Messiah, 1838. (Interesting and precious as this paraphrase is, I humbly suspect that the words in italics contain a vast deal more than ...
— Inspiration and Interpretation - Seven Sermons Preached Before the University of Oxford • John Burgon

... the time and never relaxes its hold, is the expression of the will of God, how can we charge Him with indifference? The truth is, on the contrary, that He is exercising His care, not intermittently, by performing a miracle whenever things go wrong, but continually, and without any interruption whatsoever. Were His law other than steadfast, were there occasional or frequent departures from it, were it possible to defy nature with impunity just now and ...
— Problems of Immanence - Studies Critical and Constructive • J. Warschauer

... epaulettes: for I repeat to you, this is Pitt's consulship, and promotion henceforth comes to men as they deserve it. Look at Wolfe, sir—a man barely thirty-two—and the ball but just set rolling! Wherefore I too am resolved to enter Quebec a Brigadier-General, who now go carrying the colours of the 17th to Louisbourg. We but wait Genl. Amherst, who is expected daily, and then yeo-heave-ho for the nor'ard! Farewell, dearest Jack! Given in this our camp at Halifax, the twelfth of May, 1758, in the middle of a plaguy fog, ...
— Fort Amity • Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... her ancient limits.... We are still ready to encounter, with our allies, the hazards of peace, if peace can be made on the basis proposed, satisfactorily executed [sic]; and we are not inclined to go out of our way to interfere in the internal government of France, however much we might desire to see it placed in more pacific hands. But I am satisfied we must not encourage our allies to patch up an imperfect arrangement. If they will do so, we must submit; but it should appear, in ...
— The Life of Napoleon I (Volumes, 1 and 2) • John Holland Rose

... the 'copter driver, was standing at the entrance to the breakfast nook, a smudge of oil on his cheek and his straw-colored hair in disorder. "How do I go about startin' this ...
— Null-ABC • Henry Beam Piper and John Joseph McGuire

... naked truth. Peru had invaded Bolivia and had attacked Colombia. Bolivar immediately organized an expedition, under the command of General Jose Maria Cordova,—who distinguished himself in Ayacucho,—and he, himself, prepared to go immediately. After attending to several matters of an administrative character, he started towards the South, in spite of declining health. It was torture for him to ride on horseback. He knew that little of life remained for him, and still he was going ...
— Simon Bolivar, the Liberator • Guillermo A. Sherwell

... off'ring to an angry God, O'erweighted vines shook plum and apricot, From trembling trellis, and the rose trees pour'd A red libation of sweet, ripen'd leaves, On the trim walks. To the high dove-cote set A stream of silver wings and violet breasts, The hawk-like storm swooping on their track. "Go," said my love, "the storm would whirl me off "As thistle-down. I'll shelter here—but you— "You love no storms!" "Where thou art," I said, "Is all the calm I know—wert thou enthron'd "On the pivot of the winds—or in the maelstrom, "Thou holdest in thy hand my palm ...
— Old Spookses' Pass • Isabella Valancy Crawford

... one time it was considered beneath the dignity of a gentleman to give anything but gold, and whilst that superstition prevailed, it must doubtless have pressed very hard upon poor people, to whom to go into society was to be ruinously fined, without the privilege of appeal. Even at the present day, there are certain classes of servants who are "as death, and cannot be satisfied," unless their "'itching palms" are heavily laden with their ...
— Frost's Laws and By-Laws of American Society • Sarah Annie Frost

... take you away, if it be better for you to live here a little longer. But you will have to go sometime; and if you contrived to live after God wanted you to go, you would find yourself much less ready when the time came that you must. But, my dear Miss Palmer, no one can be living a true life, to ...
— What's Mine's Mine • George MacDonald

... boats started out for the fishing-ground. Forty-one boats left the harbor that day. Before they started, the harbor -master hoisted the storm signal, and warned them of the coming tempest. He begged of them not to go; but they disregarded his warning, and away they went. They saw no sign of the coming storm. In a few hours, however, it swept down on that coast, and very few of those fishermen returned. There were five or six men in each boat, and nearly all ...
— Sowing and Reaping • Dwight Moody

... them too; go and warn Tosti, Sexwulf, Ulf and Frithgift, and be sure that thou keepest out of ...
— The Rival Heirs being the Third and Last Chronicle of Aescendune • A. D. Crake

... plays, which Rowe published in 1709. "Though the works of Mr Shakespear may seem to many not to want a comment," Rowe wrote modestly enough, "yet I fancy some little account of the man himself may not be thought improper to go along with them." Rowe did his work quite as well as the rudimentary state of the biographic art of his day allowed. He was under the complacent impression that his supply of information satisfied all reasonable curiosity. He had placed himself in the hands of Betterton, an investigator at first ...
— Shakespeare and the Modern Stage - with Other Essays • Sir Sidney Lee

... will be conducted to the scaffold, you and many other ladies with you, in the cart of the executioner, and with your hands tied behind your backs. 'Ah! I hope that in that case, I shall at least have a carriage hung in black.' 'No, madame; higher ladies than yourself will go, like you, in the common car, with their hands tied behind them.' 'Higher ladies! what! the princesses of the blood?' 'Yea, and still more exalted ...
— Clairvoyance and Occult Powers • Swami Panchadasi

... now nearly dark, and the children had to go home; but all of them declared the birthday party of Flora was the best they ...
— Proud and Lazy - A Story for Little Folks • Oliver Optic

... frightfully hungry," he said. "I don't think I've eaten anything since breakfast. May we go and forage?" ...
— Michael • E. F. Benson

... to provide myself with the articles of which I stood most in need. First of all a drag to act on my boots; for I had experienced the inconvenience of these whenever I wished to shorten my steps and examine surrounding objects more fully. A pair of slippers to go over the boots served the purpose effectually; and from that time I carried two pairs about me, because I frequently cast them off from my feet in my botanical investigations, without having time to pick them up, when threatened by the approach ...
— Stories by Foreign Authors: German (V.2) • Various

... that I have stopped living haphazard. One can't go through a great deal of"—she missed out the noun—"without planning one's actions in advance. I am going to have a child in June, and in the first place conversations, discussions, excitement, are not good for me. I will go through them if necessary, but only ...
— Howards End • E. M. Forster

... nothing," returned Wild, trying to re-assure him; "above all, when your designs prosper. Man's fate is in his own hands. You are your nephew's executioner, or he is yours. Cast off this weakness. The next hour makes, or mars you for ever. Go to your sister, and do not quit her till all is over. Leave ...
— Jack Sheppard - A Romance • William Harrison Ainsworth

... monotonous rows of niches and mouldings. In fact, it may be compared to an etching so full of unnecessary details that composition, balance of mass, and beauty of line are all smothered in them. And yet there is much to be said on the other side. The mere size—the height and width—go far to make the front impressive; and the detail, even now when so much of it has been restored, is usually beautiful. If it is not great architecture, it is at least living architecture, and as such infinitely superior ...
— The Cathedral Church of York - Bell's Cathedrals: A Description of Its Fabric and A Brief - History of the Archi-Episcopal See • A. Clutton-Brock

... Pages wanted to go down and get some water, but the professor advised him to stay where he was. He feared that the debris which we had piled up would give way beneath his weight and that he would ...
— Nobody's Boy - Sans Famille • Hector Malot

... and kissed her tenderly, whispering, "Courage, momsy, I've got something nice for you." Then she turned and said, "You are too excited, Belle. I'll do everything, and make the little we have go a great way. You would waste things. I know just what to do, only give me time," and she soaked some of the bread in the milk and began feeding her mother, who ...
— Without a Home • E. P. Roe

... I will bet you," said Athos, "that my three companions, Messieurs Porthos, Aramis, and d'Artagnan, and myself, will go and breakfast in the bastion St. Gervais, and we will remain there an hour, by the watch, whatever the enemy may ...
— The Three Musketeers • Alexandre Dumas, Pere

... eight drachmae and go and conclude a truce with the Lacedaemonians for me, my wife and my children; I leave you free, my dear citizens, to send out embassies and to ...
— The Acharnians • Aristophanes

... go downstairs," said Jane. "Bring the candle. Not you, Eustace, darling. Don't you ...
— Three Men and a Maid • P. G. Wodehouse

... go into Ney's behaviour at Waterloo except to point out that too little importance is generally given to the fact of the English cavalry having, in a happy moment, fallen on and destroyed the artillery which was being brought ...
— The Memoirs of Napoleon Bonaparte • Bourrienne, Constant, and Stewarton

... She cares not for me. She may wed another, Or go into a convent, and, thus dying, Marry Achilles ...
— The Complete Poetical Works of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow • Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

... the house where we lived together, Mouth of God gave me his word. He said: 'Go to the river and bathe. Put on your crimson tunic and flowers in your hair and go to the palace. The governor gives a feast to-night, and you are to dance and to sleep ...
— White Shadows in the South Seas • Frederick O'Brien

... there was eight years between you and the first-born babe, who was only just a-thinking of when I begin to tell. But to come back to myself, as was—mother had got too many of us still, and she was glad enough to let me go, however much she might cry over it, as soon as Lady Williams got me the place. My place was to wait upon the lady first, and make myself generally useful, as they say. But it was not very long before I was wanted in other more important ways, and having been brought up among so many ...
— Erema - My Father's Sin • R. D. Blackmore

... certain sets of phenomena, rather than that character which they have simply as groups of changes. If, asking what we really know of a plant, we exclude all the ideas associated with the words life and death, we find that the sole facts known to us are that there go on in the plant certain inter-dependent processes, in presence of certain aiding and hindering influences outside of it; and that in some cases a difference of structure or a favourable set of circumstances, allows these inter-dependent ...
— Essays: Scientific, Political, & Speculative, Vol. I • Herbert Spencer

... is this work I see? Dost think I can let thee go into a danger I do not partake? I will share in this pious act towards the ...
— The Armourer's Prentices • Charlotte M. Yonge

... in the morning, we took up arms to go to Monte-Rotondo. We did not yet know that we would ...
— Battle Studies • Colonel Charles-Jean-Jacques-Joseph Ardant du Picq

... been improved by having some of the rubbish picked up and thrown out. But do you think Solomon spent any of his precious evenings that way? No, nor Mrs. Otus either. They moved in just as it was, in the most happy-go-lucky ...
— Bird Stories • Edith M. Patch

... For when he reached home, and had watered them, he had to tie up the animals, each in its stall, and make it comfortable for the night; next, eat his own supper; then learn a proposition of Euclid, and go to bed. ...
— Sir Gibbie • George MacDonald

... many, many instances in which Banim has shown his friendship since I wrote last; let it suffice to say, that he is the sincerest, heartiest, most disinterested being that breathes. His fireside is the only one where I enjoy anything like social life or home. I go out (to Brompton Grove) occasionally in an evening, and talk or read for some hours, or have a bed, and leave ...
— A Walk from London to Fulham • Thomas Crofton Croker

... know. I am no longer Colonel de Beaujardin, but a nameless wanderer. If you speak of me it must only be as Claude the poor French peasant; but it were best not to do so at all, or you may get yourself, and me too, into trouble. Yet something I must do, and I have resolved to go off to Cape Breton, where, as I have learned at Quebec, the English are about making an ...
— The King's Warrant - A Story of Old and New France • Alfred H. Engelbach

... please to mean, sir—the town or the house? I beg your pardon for asking, but they both go by the same ...
— Armadale • Wilkie Collins

... despair with him during these days—his faith had reached high ground. "Ask, and ye shall receive," had come home to him with wonderful force just lately, while he waited on his knees; he felt that he should never let go again for a moment. Still there seemed nothing now for him to do, nothing but that constant watching and constant praying; and he had only lately come to realize how much these two things meant. Presently, sitting there in the silence, ...
— Three People • Pansy

... the years go by, and upon the shoulders of Bove Derg and Lir fell the long white hair. Fearful grew the four swans, for the time was not far off when they must wing their flight north to the wild sea ...
— Boys and Girls Bookshelf (Vol 2 of 17) - Folk-Lore, Fables, And Fairy Tales • Various

... Centaur, "each man that ever lived has sojourned for a little while, with no company save his illusions. I must tell you again that in this garden are encountered none but imaginary creatures. And stalwart persons take their hour of recreation here, and go hence unaccompanied, to become aldermen and respected merchants and bishops, and to be admired as captains upon prancing horses, or even as kings upon tall thrones; each in his station thinking not at all of the garden ever any more. But now and then ...
— Jurgen - A Comedy of Justice • James Branch Cabell

... interlocutors, "requiring a more vigilant eye to superintend them. But there is another subject which affords us much surprise, and that is the manner in which English parents permit their daughters to go alone about the streets, or to walk with a gentleman who is neither ...
— How to Enjoy Paris in 1842 • F. Herve

... want to go to school at all," continued Honor; "not, of course, because I believed Derrick's absurd stories, but simply because I was so fond of home that I ...
— The New Girl at St. Chad's - A Story of School Life • Angela Brazil

... you first, Split, to show you how it ought to go." Sissy rose, her calico rustling, to change the professorial chair for the stool of ...
— The Madigans • Miriam Michelson

... pas de cela. This is as far as she can becomingly go; and yet so far she must go. We should be disappointed if de Grignon's devotion were left without hope of reward, and yet the wound must be healed before the new love can ...
— Bataille De Dames • Eugene Scribe and Ernest Legouve

... doubtless; but how many passages of far deeper, far diviner tenderness, are to be found in Chaucer! Yet in these cases we give our antagonist the benefit of an appeal to what is really best and most effective in the ancient literature. For, if we should go to Pindar, and some other great names, what a revelation of hypocrisy as respects the fade enthusiasts for ...
— Memorials and Other Papers • Thomas de Quincey

... Europe that they could no longer indulge in the good old Bourbon, Hapsburg, and Braganza idleness and stupidity. Modern European sovereigns, almost without exception, work for their living, and work hard. Few business men go through a more severe training, or a longer and harder day of steady work, than do most of the contemporary sovereigns of Europe. This fact especially struck me on my presentation, about this time, ...
— Autobiography of Andrew Dickson White Volume II • Andrew Dickson White



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