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Herb   Listen
noun
Herb  n.  
1.
A plant whose stem does not become woody and permanent, but dies, at least down to the ground, after flowering. Note: Annual herbs live but one season; biennial herbs flower the second season, and then die; perennial herbs produce new stems year after year.
2.
Grass; herbage. "And flocks Grazing the tender herb."
Herb bennet. (Bot.) See Bennet.
Herb Christopher (Bot.), an herb (Actaea spicata), whose root is used in nervous diseases; the baneberry. The name is occasionally given to other plants, as the royal fern, the wood betony, etc.
Herb Gerard (Bot.), the goutweed; so called in honor of St. Gerard, who used to be invoked against the gout.
Herb grace, or Herb of grace. (Bot.) See Rue.
Herb Margaret (Bot.), the daisy. See Marguerite.
Herb Paris (Bot.), an Old World plant related to the trillium (Paris quadrifolia), commonly reputed poisonous.
Herb Robert (Bot.), a species of Geranium (Geranium Robertianum.)






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Herb" Quotes from Famous Books



... wild roots of the wilderness, and in times of scarcity on reptiles, grasshoppers, and the larvae of ants, or by plundering their hereditary foes and oppressors, the frontier Boers. In seasons when every green herb is devoured by swarms of locusts, and when the wild game in consequence desert the pastures of the wilderness, the Bushman finds a resource in the very calamity which would overwhelm an agricultural or civilized community. ...
— The Illustrated London Reading Book • Various

... Harmony managed to get a man on first through a fluke Texas leaguer, and began to work him along by bunt hitting, it looked dangerous for the locals. In the end, the visitors scored through a slip on the part of Herb Jones on second, who allowed the ball to get away from him because of his nervousness. The run was not earned, but it might decide the game, many ...
— Jack Winters' Baseball Team - Or, The Rivals of the Diamond • Mark Overton

... and looked at Mr. 'Possum's tongue, and felt of his pulse, and listened to his breathing, and said that the cold water seemed to have struck in and that the only thing to do was for Mr. 'Possum to stay in bed and drink hot herb tea and not eat anything, which was a very bad prescription for Mr. 'Possum, because he hated herb tea and was very partial to eating. He groaned when he heard it and said he didn't suppose he'd ever live to enjoy ...
— Children's Literature - A Textbook of Sources for Teachers and Teacher-Training Classes • Charles Madison Curry

... deliverance or repurchase of man. Man in his original, primeval state enjoyed unity and an affinity with God. Because of transgression on the part of man this natural agreement between God and man was destroyed. All creation—herb, and tree, beast and fowl, and man—was pronounced very good by the Creator as he beheld it in review after creation. ...
— The Gospel Day • Charles Ebert Orr

... sounds and odors. He was restless, miserable, anxious, homesick—not for Detroit, but for some heretofore unimagined good; yet, like Bunyan's shepherd boy in the Valley of humiliation, he carried "the herb called Heartsease in his bosom," for he ...
— Homespun Tales • Kate Douglas Wiggin

... round, white, firm throat, with two little folds that lay rosy in the rounded flesh. Closing her eyes, she inhaled passionately the aromatic perfumes of the neighbouring gardens. It was a strange mixture of odours, like that which is wafted from the herb chamber of an apothecary. A wandering sunbeam glided over the firm, short curve of her cheek, which was of almost milky whiteness, save for the faint redness of those veins which sleepless nights bring out upon the pallid ...
— The Indian Lily and Other Stories • Hermann Sudermann

... of Parliament who had an idiosyncrasy as regards parsley. After the ingestion of this herb in food he always had alarming attacks of sickness and pain in the abdomen, attended by swelling of the tongue and lips and lividity of the face. This same man could not take the smallest quantity of honey, and certain kinds of fruit ...
— Anomalies and Curiosities of Medicine • George M. Gould

... by which oath they severally swore that the cause in which they were to fight was true, and that they did not deal in any witchcraft or magic art, by which they expected to gain the victory over their adversary; and also, that they had not about their persons any herb or stone, or charm of any kind, by which they hoped ...
— Margaret of Anjou - Makers of History • Jacob Abbott

... planet seed or soul. We recognize a divine involution as the antecedent and causation of all so-called natural evolution. We see each link in the chain of being, from least to greatest, from the simplest to the most complex; grass, herb, and tree, fish, reptile, bird, and beast, as multiple yet orderly expressions of the immanence and permanence of the fatherhood of God. We view the creation of man as His highest handiwork, in which the seed of human life, bearing latent within it every high attribute and potency possessed by ...
— The Arena - Volume 4, No. 24, November, 1891 • Various

... the latter; "I—I was thinking about Kathleen." "So was I," said King, picking up his books. And in defiance of the University statute of 1636 (still unrepealed) which warns students against "frequenting dicing houses, taverns, or booths where the nicotian herb is sold," they went into Hedderly's together to ...
— Kathleen • Christopher Morley

... them on all sides. Be sure they are dry and not moist when you cut or pick them, and free them from dirt and decayed leaves. After they are entirely dried out, put them in paper bags upon which you have written the name of the herb and the date of tying it up. Hang them where the air is dry and there is no chance ...
— Practical Suggestions for Mother and Housewife • Marion Mills Miller

... while I both paused and wondered, the whole batch flew off to the waves, and left behind their new master and the shore. I was amazed, and, in doubt for a long time, I considered what could be the cause; whether some Divinity had done this, or whether the juice of {some} herb. 'And yet,' said I, 'what herb has these properties?' and with my hand I plucked the grass, and I chewed it, {so} plucked, with my teeth. Hardly had my throat well swallowed the unknown juices, when I suddenly felt my entrails inwardly throb, and my mind taken possession of by the passions ...
— The Metamorphoses of Ovid - Literally Translated into English Prose, with Copious Notes - and Explanations • Publius Ovidius Naso

... what painful vividness, is apparent from a letter which I shall translate almost in extenso; as, together with those few words which I have quoted about Gori's death, it shows the passionate tenderness that was hidden, like some aromatic herb beneath the Alpine snow, under the harsh exterior ...
— The Countess of Albany • Violet Paget (AKA Vernon Lee)

... clouds might give abundant rain; The nightly dews might fall, And the herb that keepeth life in man Might yet ...
— The Universal Reciter - 81 Choice Pieces of Rare Poetical Gems • Various

... A man must have his sense to imitate him worthily. How we look through his words at the Deluge, as he floods it upon us in Book xi. l. 738-53!—The Attic bees produce honey so flavoured with the thyme of Hymettus that it is scarcely eatable, though to smell the herb itself in a breezy walk upon that celebrated Mount would be an exceeding pleasure; thus certain epic poems are overpoweringly flavoured with herbs of Milton, while yet the fragrant balm and fresh breeze of his poetry is not to be found ...
— The Prose Works of William Wordsworth • William Wordsworth

... what's wrong wi' a body, an' maistly he can put ye richt, and there's nae new-fangled wys wi' him; a blister for the ootside an' Epsom salts for the inside dis his wark, an' they say there's no an herb on the hills ...
— Stories by English Authors: Scotland • Various

... ear, when suddenly the invasion came. The vast clouds of grasshoppers sailing northward from the great Utah desert in the United States, alighted late in the afternoon of one day and in the morning fields of grain, gardens with their promise, and every herb in the Settlement were gone, and a waste like a blasted hearth remained behind. The event was more than a loss of their crops, it seemed a heaven-struck blow upon their community, and it is said they lifted up their eyes to heaven, weeping and despairing. The sole return of ...
— The Romantic Settlement of Lord Selkirk's Colonists - The Pioneers of Manitoba • George Bryce

... could jump on the back of an eagle, you might. The Alps have height. But the Downs have swiftness. Those long stretching lines of the Downs are greyhounds in full career. To look at them is to set the blood racing! Speed is on the Downs, glorious motion, odorous air of sea and herb, exquisite as the Isles of Greece." (Geo. Meredith: ...
— Seaward Sussex - The South Downs from End to End • Edric Holmes

... summer, early in the morning, before anyone had risen, he walked out to the cemetery, to where Czipra lay "under the perfumed herb-roots:" spent some minutes there and then returned, bringing in summer a blade of living grass, in winter of dried grass ...
— Debts of Honor • Maurus Jokai

... with this tea?" asked Mr. Smith, pushing the cup I had handed him aside, after leaving sipped of its contents. "I never tasted such stuff. It's like herb tea." ...
— Trials and Confessions of a Housekeeper • T. S. Arthur

... holy herb, That sprung on holy ground! All in the Mount Olivet First wert thou found. Thou art boot for many a bruise, And healest many a wound; In our Lady's blessed name, I take thee from ...
— Waverley, Or 'Tis Sixty Years Hence, Complete • Sir Walter Scott

... horror by the man lurking outside, who fled back to the ships, imploring Ulysses to depart. Unwilling to desert his men, Ulysses on the contrary set out for Circe's dwelling, meeting on the way thither Mercury in disguise, who gave him an herb to annul the effect of Circe's drugs and directed him how to free ...
— The Book of the Epic • Helene A. Guerber

... Smilax.—Ver. 283. The dictionary meanings given for this word are—1. Withwind, a kind of herb. 2. The yew tree. 3. A kind of oak. The Nymph was probably supposed to have been changed into ...
— The Metamorphoses of Ovid - Vol. I, Books I-VII • Publius Ovidius Naso

... all things "spiritually before they were naturally upon the earth." He created "every plant of the field before it was in the earth, every herb of the field before it grew." Before this "natural" creation "there was not yet flesh upon the earth, neither in the water, neither in the air;... but spiritually were they created and made according" to the word of God. In this second or "natural" creation all things were clothed upon ...
— Added Upon - A Story • Nephi Anderson

... from her sufferings, that the narcotic beverage which she takes is supposed to be the very medicine needed, and the very one adapted to her case. The like erroneous conclusion is often made after using, with the same apparent good effect, certain hot herb teas. Yet, I repeat it, such medicinal mixtures usually—perhaps I should say always—aggravate the complaint in the end, by deranging still more the powers and functions of the stomach, and debilitating still more ...
— The Young Woman's Guide • William A. Alcott

... lain, for many a year, 'Mid the leaf and the dew-wet herb; But never, till now, came a warrior by, That has dar'd ...
— Romantic Ballads - translated from the Danish; and Miscellaneous Pieces • George Borrow

... is washed up without stint for all to take, to take as much as he can carry. Two old ladies discussing the peerage? Much may be learned, it is gold; poets and wits, then it is fountains whose spray solidifies into jewels, and every herb and plant is begemmed with the sparkle of the diamond and the ...
— Confessions of a Young Man • George Moore

... The tribuli are small engines with four spikes, one fixed in the ground, the three others erect or adverse, (Procopius, Gothic. l. iii. c. 24. Just. Lipsius, Poliorcetwv, l. v. c. 3.) The metaphor was borrowed from the tribuli, (land-caltrops,) an herb with a prickly fruit, commex in Italy. (Martin, ad Virgil. Georgic. i. 153 vol. ...
— The History of The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire - Volume 4 • Edward Gibbon

... the old woman; "and truly it ought, for it has in it blue pigeons, a fine fat cock, three wild hares, and every vegetable and savory herb known in all Jolliland. Will you have ...
— Prince Vance - The Story of a Prince with a Court in His Box • Eleanor Putnam

... sir?" responded the youth gravely. "It's the old Spanish title of the first settlement here. It comes from the name that Father Junipero Serra gave to the pretty little vine that grows wild over the sandhills, and means 'good herb.' He called it 'A balm for the wounded ...
— A Ward of the Golden Gate • Bret Harte

... with the flour was strictly forbidden. Salt Butter and Cheese was stopped on leaving England, and throughout the voyage Raisins were issued in place of the Salt Suet; in addition to the Malt, wild Celery was collected in Tierra del Fuego, and, every morning, breakfast was made from this herb, ground wheat and ...
— The Life of Captain James Cook • Arthur Kitson

... that be," I objected, "when the pea is a weak, clinging, straggling herb, and the locust a ...
— The Story of My Boyhood and Youth • John Muir

... said, bringing in, in addition to the customary herb-breakfast, an ill-cooked rabbit. Montgomery followed him. His roving eye caught the position of my ...
— The Island of Doctor Moreau • H. G. Wells

... exclaimed. ... "Or maybe some aromatic herb..." and he bent down to examine the turf at his feet. To his amazement he perceived a thick cluster of white blossoms, star- shaped and glossy-leaved, with deep golden centres, wherein bright drops of dew sparkled like brilliants, and from whence ...
— Ardath - The Story of a Dead Self • Marie Corelli

... Plantago lanceolata successfully used to stop a dangerous hemorrhage from leech bites in a situation where pressure could not be employed. He had searched out the literature of the subject, and found that, although this herb is highly spoken of by Culpepper and other old writers as a styptic, and alluded to as such in the plays of Shakespeare, its employment seems to have died out. Professor Quinlan described the suitable varieties of plantain, and exhibited preparations ...
— Scientific American Supplement, No. 362, December 9, 1882 • Various

... should not find entertainment in exploring the cross-roads of, foot by foot,—yet all my best enjoyment would be owing to the imagination of the hills, colouring with their far-away memories every lowland stone and herb. The pleasant French coteau, green in the sunshine, delights me either by what real mountain character it has in itself, (for in extent and succession of promontory, the flanks of the French valleys have quite ...
— Frondes Agrestes - Readings in 'Modern Painters' • John Ruskin

... I want to point out to you that in the eleventh verse we read of three kinds of living things which God caused the earth to bring forth. Let us look at them: (1) "grass"; (2) "the herb yielding seed"; (3) "the fruit tree yielding fruit after his kind, whose seed was ...
— Twilight And Dawn • Caroline Pridham

... hedgerows and trees whose wide-flung, rusting leafage cast a pleasant shade, while high in the sunny air a lark carolled faint and sweet against the blue. From the distant woods stole a wind languorous and fragrant of dewy earth, of herb and flower, a wind soft as a caress yet vital and full of promise (as it were) so that as I breathed of it, hope and strength were renewed in me with an assurance of future achievement. Filled thus with an ecstasy unknown till now, ...
— Peregrine's Progress • Jeffery Farnol

... a malt liquor in which the herb of this name was infused, or a person who sold the ...
— Epicoene - Or, The Silent Woman • Ben Jonson

... ursine "an excellent plant under the dominion of the moon." Of rosemary he says, "the sun claims privilege in it, and it is under the celestial ram," and of viper's bugloss, "it is a most gallant herb of the sun." The bay-tree rouses him to real eloquence, though not for Apollo's sake. "It is a tree of the sun and under the celestial sign of Leo, and resists witchcraft very potently, as also all the evils that old Saturn can do to the body of ...
— Apologia Diffidentis • W. Compton Leith

... it sparkled bright and blue in the breeze and sun. There were jelly-fish swimming about, and several left to melt away on the shore. On the shore, sprouting amongst the sand and gravel, I found samphire, growing somewhat like asparagus. It is an excellent salad at this season, salt, yet with an herb-like vivacity, and very tender. I strolled slowly through the pastures, watching my long shadow making grave, fantastic gestures in the sun. It is a pretty sight to see the sunshine brightening the entrance of a road which shortly becomes deeply overshadowed ...
— Passages From The American Notebooks, Volume 1 • Nathaniel Hawthorne

... spade work Kung Su had done in preparing hypno-recordings, Griffin had a working knowledge of the Rational People's language eleven days later when he sat down to drink herb infused hot water with Joe and other Old Ones in the low-roofed wooden building around which clustered a village of two hundred humanoids. He fidgeted through interminable ritualistic cups of hot water. ...
— Blessed Are the Meek • G.C. Edmondson

... approaching, the settlers experienced a calamity that brought poverty for the present and despair for the future. The sky was suddenly darkened by a great cloud of locusts, which had come from their breeding-places in the far south-west. During a single night, 'crops, gardens, and every green herb in the settlement had perished, with the exception of a few ears of barley gleaned in the women's aprons.' In the following year the plague reappeared; the insects came again, covering the ground so thickly that they 'might be shovelled with a spade.' The stock of seed-grain was ...
— The Red River Colony - A Chronicle of the Beginnings of Manitoba • Louis Aubrey Wood

... note on Gloriosa, and Genista. The females in Nigella, devil in the bush, are very tall compared to the males; and bending over in a circle to them, give the flower some resemblance to a regal crown. The female of the epilobium angustisolium, rose bay willow herb, bends down amongst the males for several days, and becomes ...
— The Botanic Garden. Part II. - Containing The Loves of the Plants. A Poem. - With Philosophical Notes. • Erasmus Darwin

... from their belts their rustic, home-made pipes, filling them with the tobacco of the pota, an acrid herb which was cultivated on the island. The young men strolled from the porch and adopted ferocious attitudes, their hands in their belts, and their heads held high, before the groups of women, among which were the beloved atlotas, the marriageable girls, who feigned indifference, ...
— The Dead Command - From the Spanish Los Muertos Mandan • Vicente Blasco Ibanez

... you traveled faster with that stick of yours than you ever thought you could, didn't you?" asked Herb, ...
— The Radio Boys at the Sending Station - Making Good in the Wireless Room • Allen Chapman

... ye pu' where the well rins deep? One with another. Green herb of death, fine flower ...
— Poems and Ballads (Third Series) - Taken from The Collected Poetical Works of Algernon Charles - Swinburne—Vol. III • Algernon Charles Swinburne

... from their collars. She had followed Florimel from Portlossie—to Edinburgh, and then to London, but not yet had seen how to approach her with probable advantage. In the meantime she had renewed old relations with a certain herb doctor in Kentish Town, at whose house she was now accommodated. There she had already begun to entice the confidences of maid servants, by use of what evil knowledge she had, and pretence to more, giving herself out as a wise woman. Her faith never failed her that, if she but kept handling ...
— The Marquis of Lossie • George MacDonald

... devoured. Women and children, all day long, were seen searching gutters and dunghills for morsels of food, which they disputed fiercely with the famishing dogs. The green leaves were stripped from the trees, every living herb was converted into human food, but these expedients could not avert starvation. The daily mortality was frightful infants starved to death on the maternal breasts, which famine had parched and withered; mothers dropped dead in the streets, with their ...
— The Rise of the Dutch Republic, 1555-1566 • John Lothrop Motley

... ripe, and inviting nations to the harvest. The great man makes the great thing. Wherever Macdonald[67] sits, there is the head of the table. Linnaeus[68] makes botany the most alluring of studies, and wins it from the farmer and the herb-woman: Davy,[69] chemistry; and Cuvier,[70] fossils. The day is always his who works in it with serenity and great aims. The unstable estimates of men crowd to him whose mind is filled with a truth, as the heaped waves of the Atlantic follow ...
— Essays • Ralph Waldo Emerson

... baleful herb Of earth or potion dire Drawn from the flowing ocean, hadst thou drunk, That on thee thou hast brought the public curse? Thou hast cast off, cut off; Thyself will be cast out, A thing of loathing ...
— Specimens of Greek Tragedy - Aeschylus and Sophocles • Goldwin Smith

... a native of Great Britain. In its wild state it has a strong, disagreeable taste and smell, and is known as smallage. By cultivation it becomes more mild and sweet. It is usually eaten uncooked as a salad herb, or introduced into soups as a flavouring. In its raw state, it is ...
— Science in the Kitchen. • Mrs. E. E. Kellogg

... even a stray dandelion, that stood boldly up in his yellow waistcoat, like a young country bumpkin, who feels himself a decent lad in his way—or a plant of wild marjoram, that had somehow got in, and kept meekly in a corner of the bed, trying to turn into a respectable cultivated herb. Dear old garden!—such as one rarely sees now-a-days!—I would give the finest modern pleasure-ground for ...
— John Halifax, Gentleman • Dinah Maria Mulock Craik

... much better than I was, though something of a totterer. I ate but little to-day, and of the gentlest meat. I refused ham and pigeons, pease-soup, stewed beef, cold salmon, because they were too strong. I take no snuff at all, but some herb snuff ...
— The Journal to Stella • Jonathan Swift

... which prevented me from making any early excursion. But as it cleared up about eleven o'clock, Lamont and I went into the garden, to enjoy the fragrance which every herb and flower exhales at this time of the year, after the desirable refreshment of gentle showers. I conducted him to the flower garden, which had so much delighted me the morning before; and we had not paid due admiration to all the vegetable beauties ...
— A Description of Millenium Hall • Sarah Scott

... regard to this out-of-door old gentleman is, that he never took "doctors'-stuff" in his life, until the time of that fatal fall in the dark. He was, however, an inveterate tea-drinker; and there was another aromatic herb (I write this with my pipe in my mouth) of which he was, up to the very ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 13, No. 79, May, 1864 • Various

... question," replied the sorcerer. "Being here, we have matter in our hands, and that we must attend to. Go, while I recover my breath, into the borders of the wood, and bring me the leaves of such and such a herb, and such and such a tree, which you will find to grow there plentifully—three handfuls of each. And be speedy. We must be home again before the steamer comes; it would seem strange if we had disappeared." And he sat ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 17 (of 25) • Robert Louis Stevenson

... Charles Channing was attacked with brain fever. The woman nursed him through it; she applied her own simple remedies. She cut off his hair, and kept wet linen constantly to his head; and hot bricks, wrapped round with wet steaming flannels, to his feet; and she gave him a certain herb tea to drink, which, in her firm belief and experience, had never yet failed to subdue fever. Perhaps Charley did as well without a doctor as he would have done with one. By the time they reached their destination the malady ...
— The Channings • Mrs. Henry Wood

... and hide in a cave in the glowing red porphyry rocks of the Esterelle. I can understand his retiring thither, above a sea blue as the neck of a peacock, among glowing red rocks, and masses of pines, and heather, and arbutus, and every kind of fragrant herb, and where, when only snowdrops are appearing in England, the spires of white asphodel ...
— Castles and Cave Dwellings of Europe • Sabine Baring-Gould

... herb and fern, Look further thro' the chace, Spread upward till thy boughs discern ...
— The Early Poems of Alfred Lord Tennyson • Tennyson

... old dame approve of tapestried walls, cups and bowls of silver, gold and enamel, flower-gardens or delicately-made dishes. Fortunately her daughter-in-law's herb-garden was not wholly under the ban. It contained herbs useful in medicine, and God has ordained that many useful plants are also beautiful in their season. Sage, balm, caraway, monk's hood, thyme, thrift, mint, and other plants therefore dwelt contentedly ...
— Masters of the Guild • L. Lamprey

... a Greek word, signifying an herb,) a knowledge of plants; the science which treats ...
— A Treatise on Domestic Economy - For the Use of Young Ladies at Home and at School • Catherine Esther Beecher

... and the south of Scotland." In most parts of Ireland, however, in addition to growing wild it is carefully cultivated in gardens, and occasionally on a rather extensive scale; and this is done wholly and solely in obedience to a steady popular call for the herb by phthisical sufferers. Constantly, in Irish newspapers, there are advertisements offering it for sale; and there are, in this city, pharmaceutical establishments of the first rank in which it can be bought. Still it does not appear ...
— Scientific American Supplement, No. 415, December 15, 1883 • Various

... himself up quite as willing a victim to a nauseous medicinal herb-closet, also presided over by the china shepherdess, as to this glorious cupboard. To what amazing infusions of gentian, peppermint, gilliflower, sage, parsley, thyme, rue, rosemary, and dandelion, did his courageous stomach submit ...
— The Mystery of Edwin Drood • Charles Dickens

... on the island amid a fringe of rushes, yarrow, willow-herb, loose-strife, and a few late, scented, powdery, creamy heads of meadow-sweet. The island was bigger than it looked from the bank, and it seemed covered with trees and shrubs. But when, Phoebus leading the way, they ...
— The Enchanted Castle • E. Nesbit

... will be good for her, and perhaps she will like them crisp and dry better than if they are soaked. You can raise some catnip next summer. Kitty will like that dried quite as well as the green herb. It may be kept for a special treat or for medicine, although a cat that can find plenty of grass rarely needs medicine. In the winter you can have some grass growing in a pot or ...
— Friends and Helpers • Sarah J. Eddy

... rose, and adapting part of his sermon paper to the handle of the teakettle, poured the boiling water on some herb drink for his ...
— The May Flower, and Miscellaneous Writings • Harriet Beecher Stowe

... them, without there being any remedy for it. There are certain poisonous herbs, with which, when the natives gather them, they carry, all ready, other herbs which act as antidotes. In the island of Bohol is one herb of such nature that the natives approach it from windward when they cut it from the shrub on which it grows; for the very air alone that blows over the herb is deadly. Nature did not leave this danger ...
— The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898: Volume XVI, 1609 • H.E. Blair

... Friday to the shore, to get a sort of herb that grew there. I soon heard him cry out to me, "O grief! O bad! O bad! O out there boats, one, two, three!" "Keep a stout heart," said I, to cheer him. The poor man shook with fear; for he thought that the men who brought him here, had now ...
— Robinson Crusoe - In Words of One Syllable • Mary Godolphin

... "But we got every herb here we need—boneset and sassafras and Injun physic and bark for the fever. There ain't nothing you can name we ain't got right here, or on the Sangamon, yet you talk of taking care of our children. Huh! We've moved five times since we was married. Now ...
— The Covered Wagon • Emerson Hough

... cabbages, but at any rate, a green vegetable of an expansive nature, and of such magnificent proportions that she was obliged to shut it up like an umbrella before she could pull it out. She also produced a handful of mustard and cress, a trifle of the herb called dandelion, three bunches of radishes, an onion rather larger than an average turnip, three substantial slices of beetroot, and a short prong or antler of celery; the whole of this garden-stuff having been publicly exhibited, but a short time before, as a twopenny salad, and purchased by Mrs ...
— Life And Adventures Of Martin Chuzzlewit • Charles Dickens

... of it will be to him this day. Near Michelup are lakelets worth noticing; a little under Sterbohol, in the course of this miserable Brook, is a string of fish-ponds, with their sluices open at this time, the water out, and the mud bottom sown with herb-provender for the intended carps, which is coming on beautifully, green as leeks, and nearly ready for the ...
— History of Friedrich II. of Prussia, Vol. XVIII. (of XXI.) - Frederick The Great—Seven-Years War Rises to a Height.—1757-1759. • Thomas Carlyle

... haughty race, The wronged, friendly, childlike, peaceable tribes, The swarthy archers of the wilderness, The red men to whom Nature opened all her secrets, Who knew the haunts of bird and fish, The hidden virtue of herb and root; All the travail of man and beast they knew— Birth and death, heat and cold, Hunger and thirst, love and hate; For these are the unchanging things writ in the imperishable book of life That man suckled at the breast ...
— The Song of the Stone Wall • Helen Keller

... is totally devoid of interest to a person of intelligence ... A remarkable and gravity-removing event transpired within the notice of this unassuming person recently. A discriminating individual had purchased from him a portion of his justly renowned Thrice-extracted Essence of Celestial Herb Oil—a preparation which in this experienced person's opinion, indeed, would greatly relieve the undoubted afflictions from which the one before him is evidently suffering—when ...
— The Wallet of Kai Lung • Ernest Bramah

... she untied the silk 'kerchief from her friend's neck, then stooping down, she gathered, with the quickness of thought, a handful of a certain herb, broke a young palma christi across her knee, and took out the delicate, fleshy substance found under the bark of that tree. Returning to the stranger, she filled the wound with the pith, overlaid it with ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 59, No. 367, May 1846 • Various

... an "herb doctor" and lives very poorly in a dirty little house; he was very glad to tell of his ...
— Slave Narratives: A Folk History of Slavery in the United States - From Interviews with Former Slaves: Indiana Narratives • Works Projects Administration

... both subject and painter, author and actor. Because we chose to live, we have failed. The world goes on applauding its successful charlatans, its puny-visioned authors pouring their thoughts of sawdust in the reeking trough of popularity; while we, who know the taste of every bitter herb in all experience—we are thrust aside as failures. . . . But the gift of prophecy is on me to-night. There is a youth here who has a soul capable of scaling heights where none of us could follow—and a soul that could sink to depths that ...
— The Parts Men Play • Arthur Beverley Baxter

... allowed) even to enter the presence of the wives of the king, and they stay with them and eat betel with them, a thing which no other person may do, no matter what his rank may be. This betel is a herb which has a leaf like the leaf of the pepper, or the ivy of our country; they always eat this leaf, and carry it in their mouths with another fruit called areca. This is something like a medlar, but it is very hard, and it is very ...
— A Forgotten Empire: Vijayanagar; A Contribution to the History of India • Robert Sewell

... desolate landscape, and scarcely bettered when one turned to look over the level which spreads north of the town; one discovers patches of foliage, indeed, the dark perennial verdure of the south; but no kindly herb clothes the soil. In springtime, it seems, there is a growth of grass, very brief, but luxuriant. That can only be on the lower ground; these furrowed heights declare ...
— By the Ionian Sea - Notes of a Ramble in Southern Italy • George Gissing

... the United States. The tour was made, but the receipts barely covered expenses. Then in 1830, Lincecum set himself up as a physician at Columbus. No sooner had he built up a practice, however, than he became dissatisfied with allopathy and went to study herb remedies among the Indians; and thereafter he practiced botanic medicine. In 1834 he went as surgeon with an exploring party to Texas and found that country so attractive that after some years further at Columbus he spent the rest of his long life in Texas as a planter, physician and student ...
— American Negro Slavery - A Survey of the Supply, Employment and Control of Negro Labor as Determined by the Plantation Regime • Ulrich Bonnell Phillips

... was their end appointed, and thither the Coqcigrues can never come. For all the air of that land is full of laughter, which killeth Coqcigrues; and there aboundeth the herb Pantagruelion. But for thee, Master Francoys, thou art not well liked in this island of ours, where the Coqcigrues are abundant, very fierce, cruel, and tyrannical. Yet thou hast thy friends, that meet and drink to thee, and wish thee well wheresoever thou hast ...
— Letters to Dead Authors • Andrew Lang

... on, "is symbolized by a shrub with pinkish flowers, a kind of bitter-sweet, as it is popularly called, and by Herb Basil, which ever since the Middle Ages has had the same character ascribed to it of cruelty and rage as to its namesake, the basilisk, in ...
— The Cathedral • Joris-Karl Huysmans

... sheep were grazing in various portions of the uncultivated plain. At first sight they appeared to be only searching for food among the stones and dust, but upon close examination I found a peculiar fleshy herb something like the stone-crop which grows upon the old walls and rocks of England. This plant was exceedingly salt, and the sheep devoured it with avidity, and were in fair condition. The wool was long, but of a coarse wiry texture, and much impaired by the adherence ...
— Cyprus, as I Saw it in 1879 • Sir Samuel W. Baker

... brains. And our homes are tumbling about our heads, because there's no one to look after them. 'One man among a thousand have I found, but a woman among all those have I not found.' Back with them to nursery and kitchen, pantry and herb-garden! Back with them, or ...
— Our Friend the Charlatan • George Gissing

... its pasturage. Near where it entered, a bathing-house of white marble had been built, under which the water flowed, and the dive could be taken to a paved depth, and you swam out over a pebbly bottom into sun-light, screened by the thick-weeded banks, loose-strife and willow-herb, and mint, nodding over you, and in the later season long-plumed yellow grasses. Here at sunrise the young men washed their limbs, and here since her return home English Rose loved to walk by night. She had often spoken of the little ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... to smoke!" replied Ravonino with something of a humorous twinkle in his eyes. "But we don't smoke. We only snuff. In making our snuff we first dry the tobacco leaves and grind them to powder. Then to this we add the ashes of the leaves of a sweet-smelling herb, the mixture being twice as much tobacco as ashes; a small quantity of potash or salt is added, and then it is ...
— The Fugitives - The Tyrant Queen of Madagascar • R.M. Ballantyne

... salad burnet, and is a hardy herb, which will continue green during the greater part of the year. The young and tender leaves possess a smell and taste almost identical with cucumber, and greatly enhance the flavour of the salad. These leaves, when blanched, ...
— The Art of Living in Australia • Philip E. Muskett (?-1909)

... flow'rets bright, Glisten'd with the dew of night; Nor herb nor flow'ret glisten'd there, But was carved in the cloister'd arches ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, No. 290 - Volume X. No. 290. Saturday, December 29, 1827. • Various

... Quixote, lean and bold,'—good, is it not? Oh, while it strikes me, good, too, is that 'Swineshead Monk' ballad! Only I miss the old chronicler's touch on the method of concocting the poison: 'Then stole this Monk into the Garden and under a certain herb found out a Toad, which, squeezing into a cup,' &c. something to that effect. I suspect, par parenthese, you have found out by this time my odd liking for 'vermin'—you once wrote 'your snails'—and certainly snails are old clients of mine—but efts! Horne traced a line to me—in ...
— The Letters of Robert Browning and Elizabeth Barrett Barrett, Vol. 1 (of 2) 1845-1846 • Robert Browning and Elizabeth Barrett Barrett

... tongue a true love he bare: some sweet herb; another reading, however, is "a true love-knot," which may have been of ...
— The Canterbury Tales and Other Poems • Geoffrey Chaucer

... "Let the earth bring forth the green herb" means, not that plants were then actually produced in their proper nature, but that a germinative power was given the earth to produce plants by the work of propagation; so that the earth is then said to have brought ...
— Library Of The World's Best Literature, Ancient And Modern, Vol. 2 • Charles Dudley Warner

... a view of the army and of the strength of the enemy, there met him by chance a train of mules loaded with parsley; which his soldiers conceived to be an ominous occurrence or ill-boding token, because this is the herb with which we not unfrequently adorn the sepulchres of the dead; and there is a proverb derived from the custom, used of one who is dangerously sick, that he has need of nothing but parsley. So, to ease their minds, and free them from any superstitious ...
— Plutarch's Lives • A.H. Clough

... destiny fits my mind, rather with Adonis to die in chase than be counted a wanton in Venus' knee. Although I pity thy martyrdom, yet I can grant no marriage; for though I held thee fair, yet mine eye is not fettered: love grows not, like the herb Spattana, to his perfection in one night, but creeps with the snail, and yet at last attains to the top. Festina lente, especially in love, for momentary fancies are oft-times the fruits of follies. If, Phoebe, I should like thee as the Hyperborei ...
— Rosalynde - or, Euphues' Golden Legacy • Thomas Lodge

... and partly above it would be any more confirmed by the ascertained facts of physical geography and meteorology than it was before; whether the creation of the whole vegetable world, and especially of "grass, herb yielding seed after its kind, and tree bearing fruit," before any kind of animal, is "affirmed" by the apparently plain teaching of botanical palaeontology, that grasses and fruit-trees originated long subsequently to animals all these are questions which, if I mistake not, would be answered ...
— The Interpreters of Genesis and the Interpreters of Nature - Essay #4 from "Science and Hebrew Tradition" • Thomas Henry Huxley

... Palo amarillo is a kind of household remedy used extensively in every family. There are many other highly valued herbs and trees, some of which have a wonderfully refreshing and invigorating aromatic scent. Headache is cured by a green herb called pachoco, of which they smell until they begin to sneeze. To cure constipation they boil ari with a grain of salt, or they heat stones and pour water over them and sit ...
— Unknown Mexico, Volume 1 (of 2) • Carl Lumholtz

... intelligible to the little, bandy-legged fellow, whose supports had become curved from much riding on an elephant's neck; but there was no mistaking the private's action as he took out the roll of tobacco, opened one end so as to expose the finely shredded aromatic herb, held it to his nose, and then passed it on to the mahout, whose big, dull, brown eyes began to glisten, and he hesitated as if in doubt, till the private pressed it into his hands and made a sign as if of filling a pipe and puffing out ...
— Trapped by Malays - A Tale of Bayonet and Kris • George Manville Fenn

... kind Nature wakes her genial pow'r, Suckles each herb, and spreads out ev'ry flower, Annual for me, the grape, the rose renew, The juice nectareous, ...
— Why Worry? • George Lincoln Walton, M.D.

... others sleep. From timid jasmine buds that keep Their odor to themselves all day But when the sunlight dies away Let the delicious secret out To every breeze that roams about;— When thus NAMOUNA:—"'Tis the hour "That scatters spells on herb and flower, "And garlands might be gathered now, "That twined around the sleeper's brow "Would make him dream of such delights, "Such miracles and dazzling sights "As Genii of the Sun behold "At evening from their tents of gold "Upon the horizon—where ...
— The Complete Poems of Sir Thomas Moore • Thomas Moore et al

... people of the house went down to the town for the medicines I ordered, I wrapped myself in a blanket and walked sharply to and fro along the veranda, drinking at intervals a cup of warm tea, made of a bitter herb in use amongst the natives, called Pajemarioba, a leguminous plant growing in all waste places. About an hour afterwards, I took a good draught of a decoction of elder blossoms as a sudorific, and soon after ...
— The Naturalist on the River Amazons • Henry Walter Bates

... is made in this manner. Those skilful in such arts mix common oil with a certain herb, keep it a long time and when the mixture is completed they thicken it with a material derived from some natural source, like a thicker oil. The material being a liquor produced in Persia, and called, as I have already said, ...
— The Roman History of Ammianus Marcellinus • Ammianus Marcellinus

... heraldry of genius: he has more quarterings in his shield. Not only does he excel the other in brief essay, depending only on endogenous forces, whereas Irving is always adorning his paragraphs with that herb-o'-grace, quotation, but he also greatly surpasses him in the construction of his stories; and finally, his psychological analysis and symbolic imagination place him beyond rivalry. It is a brilliant instance of the more ideal mind asserting its ...
— A Study Of Hawthorne • George Parsons Lathrop

... for it; Commanded His morning, and, behold! chaos fled Before the uplifted face of the sun; Divided a water-course for the overflowing of waters; Sent rain upon the earth— Upon the wilderness wherein there was no man, Upon the desert where grew no tender herb, And, lo! there was greenness upon the plains, And the hills were clothed with beauty! Out of the uncharted, unthinkable dark we came, And in a little time we shall return again ...
— The World I Live In • Helen Keller

... Knotted, and Pot.—Hardy annuals. Aromatic and sweet flavour. Used for stuffings and as a pot herb; leaves ...
— Gardening for the Million • Alfred Pink

... covered with many small hooks, which make it catch on firmly by several points of attachment to passing animals. These are the kinds we human beings of either sex oftenest find clinging to our skirts or trousers after a walk in a rabbit-warren. But in herb-bennet and avens each nut has a single long awn, crooked near the middle with a very peculiar S-shaped joint, which effectually catches on to the wool or hair, but drops at the elbow after a short period of withering. Sometimes, too, the whole ...
— Science in Arcady • Grant Allen

... which they fenced themselves during this vigil, are now unknown; but it was reckoned a feat of no small danger, as the person undertaking it was exposed to the most dreadful assaults from spirits, who dreaded the effect of this powerful herb in the hands of a cabalist. Such were the shades, which the original superstition, concerning the. Fairies, received from the chivalrous sentiments of the ...
— Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border, Vol. II (of 3) • Walter Scott

... army, and the Tory physician had departed to the British lines. But, as is well known, the women in the early days of New Jersey were often obliged to be physicians; and among the good housewives of Burlington, who knew all about herb teas, homemade plasters, and potions, Mrs. Morris held a high position. The sick Continentals were told that she was just as good as a doctor, and, besides, was a very kind woman, always ready to ...
— The Junior Classics • Various

... outburst of life all about him, yet never more aware of his isolation from it all. His body seemed to belong to it all, swayed and governed by the same laws that prompted their gentle motions to tree and herb; but his soul seemed to him to-day like a bright creature caught in the meshes of a net, beating its wings in vain against the constraining threads. From what other free and spacious country was it exiled? What other place did it turn to with desire ...
— Beside Still Waters • Arthur Christopher Benson

... meadows and now and then come to the river to drink. It is overhung with alders, and two or three stand on separate little islands held together by roots. The winter floods biting into the banks have cut miniature cliffs, and at their base grow the forget-me-not, the willow-herb, and flowering rush. A brightly-plumaged bird, too swift to be recognised—could it be a kingfisher?—darts along the margin of the stream and disappears in its black shadows. The wind blows gently from the west: it is just strong enough to show the silver sides ...
— More Pages from a Journal • Mark Rutherford

... in the Lower World (from a vase of the style of Lower Italy), 39 Moses (from a painting in the Catacomb of S. Agnes), 43 Decoration of a Roof (Catacomb of S. Domitilla), 44 Justinian, Theodora, and Attendants (from a mosaic picture at S. Vitalis, Ravenna), 46 The Discovery of the Herb Mandragora (from a MS. of Dioskorides, at Vienna), 48 King David (from a window in Augsburg Cathedral), 51 Window (from the Cathedral of St. Denis), 52 Figure of Henry I. in west window of Strasbourg Cathedral, 55 Birth of the Virgin (from the Grandes Heures ...
— A History of Art for Beginners and Students: Painting, Sculpture, Architecture - Painting • Clara Erskine Clement

... tidy table." The doctor came along—seemed well satisfied to do so. But this was the third time Sally had wished that Dr. Conrad wouldn't, and this time she felt she must explain. She wasn't at all sure that the name of that herb hadn't somehow got into the atmosphere—caught on, as it were, and twitted her. After all, why shouldn't she speak a plain thought to an old friend, as poor Prosy was now? Who could gainsay it? Moreover—now, surely this was an inspiration—why shouldn't she kill two birds ...
— Somehow Good • William de Morgan

... Twigs. Fensalir (fen sa ler'). The home of Frigga. forget-me-not (for get'-me-not). A small herb bearing a blue flower, and considered the emblem of fidelity. Frigga (frig' ga). The supreme goddess of ...
— Classic Myths • Retold by Mary Catherine Judd

... localities, the richer will be the daily life that feeds upon the past, and the more valuable the things that have been long established: so that our children will be less prodigal than their fathers in sacrificing good institutions to passionate impulses and impracticable theories. This herb of grace, let us hope, may be found in the old ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 10, No. 57, July, 1862 - A Magazine Of Literature, Art, And Politics • Various

... in 1586. This flower of sanctity, whose fragrance has filled the whole Christian world, is the patroness of America, the St. Theresa of Transatlantic Spain. She was distinguished, in the first place, by her austerities. 'Her usual food was an herb bitter as wormwood. When compelled by her mother to wear a wreath of roses, she so adjusted it on her brow that it became a crown of thorns. Rejecting a host of suitors, she destroyed the lovely complexion ...
— The International Monthly, Volume 3, No. 2, May, 1851 • Various

... deformed old figure with a face that haunted men's memories longer than they liked—took leave of Hester Prynne, and went stooping away along the earth. He gathered here and there a herb, or grubbed up a root and put it into the basket on his arm. His gray beard almost touched the ground as he crept onward. Hester gazed after him a little while, looking with a half fantastic curiosity to see whether the tender grass of early spring would not ...
— The Scarlet Letter • Nathaniel Hawthorne

... water so as to have the appearance of a cream. Nor was it without some kind of seasoning that gave it a bitter taste. Another dish soon followed, the principal article of which was also salmon roes, with a large proportion of gooseberries, and an herb that appeared to be sorrel. Its acidity rendered it more agreeable to my taste than the former preparation. Having been regaled with these delicacies, for such they were considered by that hospitable spirit which ...
— Pioneers in Canada • Sir Harry Johnston

... covering them with Skins and Matchcoats: They have a large Fire not far off, wherein they heat Stones, or (where they are wanting) Bark, putting it into this Stove, which casts an extraordinary Heat: There is a Pot of Water in the Bagnio, in which is put a Bunch of an Herb, bearing a Silver Tassel, not much unlike the Aurea Virga. With this Vegetable they rub the Head, Temples, and other Parts, which is reckon'd a Preserver of the Sight and Strengthener of the Brain. We went, this day, about 12 Miles, one of our Company being lame of his Knee. We pass'd over ...
— A New Voyage to Carolina • John Lawson

... that reviving Herb, that Spicy Weed, The Cat-Nip. Tho' 'tis good in time of need, Ah, feed upon it lightly, for who knows To what unlovely antics it ...
— The Rubaiyat of a Persian Kitten • Oliver Herford

... and intersecting each other in every direction; and canst thou fancy those wheels arrested in their motion by some magic power—their rays retained, but their fires extinguished and their brightness gone? Then mayst thou conceive the curious beauty of this little herb—a plant so unlike all others that we would fain believe it the reanimated spirit of a race that flourished in former ages, with those hideous monsters whose bones alone remain to tell the history ...
— Cactus Culture For Amateurs • W. Watson

... groweth also a certain kind of herb whereof in summer they make a great provision for all the year, making great account of it, and only men use it; and first they cause it to be dried in the sun, then wear it about their necks wrapped in a little beast's skin made like a bag, together with a hollow ...
— Pioneers in Canada • Sir Harry Johnston

... and deprived us of the rays of the sun. We found it was a cloud of locusts raised about twenty or thirty fathoms from the ground, and covering an extent of several leagues; at length a shower of these insects descended, and after devouring every green herb, while they rested, again resumed their flight. This cloud was brought by a strong east-wind, and was all the morning in passing over the adjacent ...
— Zoonomia, Vol. I - Or, the Laws of Organic Life • Erasmus Darwin

... better after my long sleep, though still weak an' wobbly. I'd hev made myself some herb tea, but I wuz beginnin' to git tre-men-jeous-ly hungry. Managed to watch at a spring not far from here until a deer came down to drink one night, an' I shot him. Been livin' on deer meat since then, an' waitin' fur my headache to go away. Expected you an' Sol ...
— The Riflemen of the Ohio - A Story of the Early Days along "The Beautiful River" • Joseph A. Altsheler

... shillings, or three pounds a year. The girl has scarce been a week, nay, a day in her service, but a committee of servant-wenches are appointed to examine her, who advise her to raise her wages, or give warning; to encourage her to which, the herb- woman, or chandler-woman, or some other old intelligencer, provides her a place of four or five pounds a year; this sets madam cock-a-hoop, and she thinks of nothing now but vails and high wages, and so gives warning from place ...
— Everybody's Business is Nobody's Business • Daniel Defoe

... in each flower, A story in each stream and bower; On every herb on which we tread, Are written words which, rightly read, Will lead us from earth's fragrant sod To ...
— Graded Memory Selections • Various

... was especially applied to Orpiment, the form in which this metal most usually occurred. So the term Verbena (quasi Herbena) originally denoted all those herbs that were held sacred on account of their being employed in the rites of sacrifice, as we learn from the poets; but as one herb was usually adopted upon these occasions, the word Verbena came to denote that particular herb only, and it is transmitted to us to this day under the same title, viz., Verbena or Vervain, and indeed until lately it enjoyed the medical reputation which its ...
— A System Of Logic, Ratiocinative And Inductive • John Stuart Mill

... their criss handles very neatly; which is all the work that most of them perform. They are great eaters; but the gentry allow nothing to their slaves except rice sodden in water, with some roots and herbs. They have also an herb called betel, which they carry with them wherever they go; in boxes, or wrapped up in a cloth like a sugar-loaf; and also a nut called pinang,[123] which are both very hot-tasted, and which they chew continually to warm them within, and to keep away the flux. They also use much tobacco, ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Vol. VIII. • Robert Kerr

... no botanist, but I have long found pleasure in herb-gathering. I love to come upon a plant which is unknown to me, to identify it with the help of my book, to greet it by name when next it shines beside my path. If the plant be rare, its discovery gives me joy. Nature, the great Artist, makes her ...
— The Private Papers of Henry Ryecroft • George Gissing

... very good and cheap, and is much drunk in the islands. Eleventh: there will be a supply of jars of biscuit and flour. Twelfth: kidney beans, even better than Spanish lentils, are common in the islands. Thirteenth: there will be made here a supply of sandals of anabo, which is an herb like hemp, of which rigging is made for ships. There is also a great deal of cotton. Fourteenth: linen cloth for shirts, doublets, breeches, hose, and other things wrought of linen, is very common and cheap here, both of domestic and Chinese make. Fifteenth: in Cagayan there is abundance ...
— The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898 - Volume VI, 1583-1588 • Emma Helen Blair

... came to himself and listened. The fairies were now gathered within the grassy bank of the rath, and a fine uproar they made. But Guleesh listened with all his ears, and he heard one fairy saying to another that a magic herb grew by Guleesh's own door, and that Guleesh had nothing to do but pluck it and boil it and give it to his sweetheart, the daughter of the King of France, and she would be well, for just then she was lying ...
— Balder The Beautiful, Vol. I. • Sir James George Frazer

... again on the flyleaf: "Who hath divided a watercourse for the overflowing of waters, or a way for the lightning of thunder, to cause it to rain on the earth where no man is, on the wilderness wherein there is no man, to satisfy the desolate and waste ground, and to cause the bud of the tender herb to spring forth? For He maketh small the drops of water; they pour down rain according to the vapor thereof, which the clouds do drop and distil upon man abundantly. Also can any understand the spreadings of the clouds, or the ...
— Good Stories For Great Holidays - Arranged for Story-Telling and Reading Aloud and for the - Children's Own Reading • Frances Jenkins Olcott

... was the first to kill my man and take his horses—to wit the warrior Mulius. He was son-in-law to Augeas, having married his eldest daughter, golden-haired Agamede, who knew the virtues of every herb which grows upon the face of the earth. I speared him as he was coming towards me, and when he fell headlong in the dust, I sprang upon his chariot and took my place in the front ranks. The Epeans fled in all directions when they saw the captain of their horsemen (the best man they had) ...
— The Iliad • Homer

... "Odyssey," she is at home again, playing the gracious part of hostess to Odysseus's wandering son, pouring into the bowl the magic herb of Egypt, "which brings forgetfulness of sorrow." The wandering son of Odysseus departs with a gift for his bride, "to wear upon the day of her desire, a memorial of the hands of Helen," the beautiful hands, that in Troy or Argos were ...
— Adventures among Books • Andrew Lang

... sand, and doomed to fall when the rains shall descend, the floods come, and the winds blow. The returning autumn, with its harvest of sustenance and wealth, bids us contemplate again the mystery and harmony of the natural world. The tree and the herb produce seed, and the seed again produces the tree and the herb, each after its kind. There is a continued production and reproduction; but of responsibility there is none. As there is no intelligent violation of law, there is no accountability. Man, however, is an intelligent, dependent, ...
— Thoughts on Educational Topics and Institutions • George S. Boutwell

... Kalmia Smilacina, etc., may still be gathered in the greatest abundance throughout most of this month. Here is also the bunch of Pigeon berry, in full bloom, the Brooklime Spedwell, the Blue-eyed-grass, the herb Bennet, the Labrador Tea, the Oxalis Stricta and Oxalis acetosella, one with yellow, the other with white and purple flowers: the first grows in ploughed fields, the second in the woods. "Our sensitive plant; they shut up their leaves and go to sleep at night, and on the approach ...
— Picturesque Quebec • James MacPherson Le Moine

... times," wrote Harrison, "the taking-in of the smoke of an Indian herb called 'Tobaco' by an instrument formed like a little ladle . . . is greatly taken up and used in England against rewmes [colds] and some other diseases." Like other drugs, tobacco soon came to be used as a narcotic for its own sake, and was ...
— The Age of the Reformation • Preserved Smith



Words linked to "Herb" :   vascular plant, beaked parsley, Curcuma domestica, herb bennet, geranium, cultivated carrot, ginger, Halogeton souda, Emilia sagitta, garden egg, Emilia javanica, clammyweed, arugula, graminaceous plant, buckwheat, gum plant, false mitrewort, herb roberts, Greek clover, blue pimpernel, flameflower, Armoracia rusticana, chicory, bush pea, California yellow bells, Anthyllis vulneraria, Arnoseris minima, buttercup, bellflower, basil thyme, heal all, Eranthis hyemalis, Glycyrrhiza lepidota, cardamom, cat's feet, corn mayweed, elsholtzia, dog's mercury, calamint, Cichorium intybus, forget-me-not, giant hyssop, garden forget-me-not, Antennaria dioica, beetleweed, fetid horehound, Galax urceolata, Elettaria cardamomum, German chamomile, bird's foot trefoil, Anigozanthus manglesii, false nettle, common devil's claw, aspidistra, chamomile, Clinopodium vulgare, bergenia, gumbo, American liquorice, Galeopsis tetrahit, evening primrose, drypis, feabane mullet, alumroot, herb Paris, false rue, elephant-tusk, Curcuma longa, cow parsnip, Asparagus officinales, carrion flower, Cape dagga, celeriac, Apium graveolens dulce, cumfrey, bishop's cap, chickweed, Chamaemelum nobilis, goldenseal, dock, belladonna, agueweed, canna, Collinsonia canadensis, gas plant, cayenne jasmine, Glycyrrhiza glabra, Daucus carota sativa, arum, dragonhead, Eruca sativa, creeping zinnia, apple of Peru, Amsinckia grandiflora, day lily, Australian pitcher plant, digitalis, cottonweed, dog fennel, blueweed, Cephalotus follicularis, cruciferous plant, catmint, Eupatorium rugosum, crowfoot, Catharanthus roseus, Eupatorium purpureum, coolwart, clammy chickweed, Berteroa incana, Dicentra canadensis, Chrysanthemum balsamita, burnet bloodwort, benny, black henbane, Guinea grains, false rue anemone, fringepod, fraxinella, coltsfoot, celery root, bloodroot, eggplant bush, Desmanthus ilinoensis, Alexander, columbo, coreopsis, fleabane, Coriandrum sativum, cockscomb, Halogeton glomeratus, bleeding heart, carnivorous plant, arnica, herb garden, Dutchman's breeches, Celosia argentea cristata, bible leaf, goat's rue, campanula, bedstraw, Anacyclus pyrethrum, false miterwort, carrot, bladderpod, butter-flower, Cichorium endivia, Asarum shuttleworthii, Acinos arvensis, coriander plant, blue skullcap, celandine, cleome, asparagus, black saltwort, halogeton, belladonna plant, Eupatorium capillifolium, giant buttercup, brinjal, Atropa belladonna, Anthriscus cereifolium, common unicorn plant, Cassia marilandica, gypsywort, herbaceous plant, blowball, bishop's hat, fines herbes, Cacalia lutea, Galega officinalis, edible asparagus, achillea, camphor dune tansy, common cockscomb, asclepiad, Eupatorium maculatum, herb Christopher, cushion calamint, Eupatorium aya-pana, balsamroot, Dicentra spectabilis, asparagus fern, glasswort, Conopodium denudatum, Anethum graveolens, devil's apples, Dalmatia pyrethrum, Dicentra cucullaria, Anthriscus sylvestris, Gerardia pedicularia, bar-room plant, false foxglove, Gerardia virginica, Australian sword lily, bird of paradise, caryophyllaceous plant, herbage, esparcet, deer's-ear, fumewort, elephant's-foot, Cynoglossum virginaticum, Cacalia javanica, astilbe, Chrysanthemum cinerariifolium, Borago officinalis, Cuminum cyminum, Anthemis nobilis, cupflower, astrantia, fenugreek, deer's-ears, Abyssinian banana, cardamon, false bugbane, Frasera speciosa, Cynoglossum amabile, burning bush, willowherb, anise plant, Coptis trifolia groenlandica, Asparagus setaceous, bee balm, Carum carvi, coral necklace, galax, bells of Ireland, gipsywort, crotalaria, blue devil, herb mercury, American ginseng, dagga, dog mercury, feverroot, bloodwort, green gentian, fumeroot, Aspidistra elatio, false gromwell, feverfew, Coptis groenlandica, bog hemp, ground cherry, Descurainia pinnata, Abelmoschus esculentus, baby blue-eyes, barilla, cumin, herb of grace, Cakile maritima, aubergine, alpine coltsfoot, Cnidoscolus urens, golden thread, Celosia argentea, Diplotaxis erucoides, blue thistle, Celosia cristata, globeflower, golden groundsel, asparagus pea, flax, butterbur, boneset, crucifer, dragon's head, butterflower, gall of the earth, goosefoot, herb doctor, andryala, alumbloom, banana, Diplotaxis muralis, gesneria, devil nettle, Apium graveolens rapaceum, Dictamnus alba, climbing onion, Dalmatian pyrethrum, Ageratina altissima, Eupatorium perfoliatum, Aureolaria virginica, Cape periwinkle, hawkweed, bugleweed, camomile, angelique, flame flower, benni, agrimony, ayapana, globe thistle, Chrysanthemum parthenium, globe flower, herb robert, breadroot, Ethiopian banana



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