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Ingle   Listen
verb
Ingle  v. t.  To cajole or coax; to wheedle. See Engle. (Obs.)






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Ingle" Quotes from Famous Books



... track showed that the patrol had recently turned at the end of his beat; but the guide knew the country thoroughly, and professed to have no fears. To speak the truth, I had heard him, when in the ingle-nook, and warm with Old Rye, vaunt so loudly his own sagacity and courage, that I conceived certain misgivings as to how far either were to be relied on. That night, however, he fully maintained part of his character by leading us safety and surely ...
— Border and Bastille • George A. Lawrence

... grave be needed, to write, myself, this book for me and for you. Hope has spread her iridescent Psyche-wings and left me; Ambition long ago shed hers to become a working-ant. Love never came to sit in the chair beside the ingle. An ocean heaves between us, only for nightly dreams and waking thoughts to span. Were those dear eyes to see me as I am to-day, I wonder whether they would know me? For I grow grey, and furrows deepen in the forehead the dear hand will never smooth again. Remember me, then, only as I used to ...
— The Dop Doctor • Clotilde Inez Mary Graves

... said a querulous, peevish voice from the ingle-neuk, where the mother, dull-eyed, depressed, and untidy, sat with her elbows on her knees. She was in a poor state of health, and had not recovered from the last week's outburst. It was Saturday night, but there was no pay forthcoming from the head of the house, who was still in Duke ...
— The Guinea Stamp - A Tale of Modern Glasgow • Annie S. Swan

... 'at's 'maist frozen to deid wi' cauld. Will ye tak' her in and lat her stan' by your ingle-neuk, ...
— Alec Forbes of Howglen • George MacDonald

... presume) are excellent, And greatly varied from the vulgar form, If Prospero's invention gave them life. How now! what stuff is here? "Sir Lorenzo, I muse we cannot see thee at Florence: 'Sblood, I doubt, Apollo hath got thee to be his Ingle, that thou comest not abroad, to visit thine old friends: well, take heed of him; he may do somewhat for his household servants, or so; But for his Retainers, I am sure, I have known some of them, ...
— Every Man In His Humour • Ben Jonson

... under the low, rose-covered porch into a wide square room, with raftered ceiling and deep carved oak ingle nook,—and here at the table, with a quarto volume opened out before her, sat Gloria, resting her head on one fair hand, her rich hair falling about her in loose shining tresses, and her whole attitude expressive of the deepest absorption in study. As they ...
— Temporal Power • Marie Corelli

... been an inn, we found the mistress both civil and obliging, and she did her best to provide for our hungry requirements. The house was evidently a very old one, and we wondered what queer people had sat in that ingle-nook and what strange stories they had told there. The fireplace was of huge dimensions; hanging above it was a single-and a double-barrelled gun, while some old crockery and ancient glass bottles adorned various parts of the kitchen—evidently ...
— From John O'Groats to Land's End • Robert Naylor and John Naylor

... last time. No one more than he had appreciated the simple dignity of its old-world style, or had more correctly estimated the priceless value of the antique oak panelling that covered its walls. He loved the great ingle-nook, set deep back as it were, in the very bosom of the house, with its high and elaborately carved benches on each side, and its massive armorial emblems wrought in black oak, picked out with tarnished gold, crimson and azure,—he appreciated every small gleam and narrow ...
— God's Good Man • Marie Corelli

... them. She considered a moment, looking first at Ramiro and next at Adrian. Then her head dropped upon her breast, and turning without a word she followed them up the creaking oaken stair that rose from a niche near the wall of the ingle-nook. ...
— Lysbeth - A Tale Of The Dutch • H. Rider Haggard

... was proud of our Kate, Kate with the red hair and the milk-white face, the saucy eye and the shrewd tongue, Kate with the tradesman's head and the heart of gold. She shook madam warmly by the hand, and led her to my great arm-chair in the ingle-nook as to a throne that ...
— The Yeoman Adventurer • George W. Gough

... member of her own family. They knew her least of all, as is often true of one's own people. Her three married sisters—Grace in Seattle, Ella in Chicago, and Flora in Chippewa—regarded her with a rather affectionate disapproval from the snug safety of their own conjugal ingle-nooks. ...
— Half Portions • Edna Ferber

... tentie curious lad, Who o'er the ingle hangs his head, And begs of neighbours books to read; For hence arise Thy country's sons, who far are ...
— The Life of Thomas Telford by Smiles • Samuel Smiles

... that glide up the harbor for refuge, and are heard but once, when the chain-cable rattles as it runs out, and the iron hand of the anchor grasps the rock. It always seems to me that these unwieldy creatures are gathered, not about the neighboring lighthouse only, but around our ingle-side. Welcome, ye great winged strangers, whose very names are unknown! This hearth is comprehensive in its hospitalities; it will accept from you either its fuel or its guests; your mariners may warm themselves beside it, ...
— Oldport Days • Thomas Wentworth Higginson

... call forth your powers of pleasing; bring up his favourite topics of conversation; amuse him with music; do all that you can to convince him that he has a most delightful wife, and trust me, dear girl, you will never fail to make his own "ingle side" the happiest spot ...
— The Wedding Guest • T.S. Arthur

... them, after the Dutch fashion—for there in Lincolnshire they had much traffic with the Dutch. There was a great table made of one slab of a huge oak from near Boston. Here they all ate. And above the ingle was another slab of oak from the same tree. Her little old step-mother sat in a stuff chair covered with a sheep-skin; she sat there night and day, shivering with the shaking palsy. At times she let out ...
— The Fifth Queen Crowned • Ford Madox Ford

... the lost Scholar long was seen to stray, Seen by rare glimpses, pensive and tongue-tied, In hat of antique shape, and cloak of grey, 55 The same the gipsies wore. Shepherds had met him on the Hurst deg. in spring; deg.57 At some lone alehouse in the Berkshire moors, deg. deg.58 On the warm ingle-bench, the smock-frock'd boors Had found him seated ...
— Matthew Arnold's Sohrab and Rustum and Other Poems • Matthew Arnold

... half envying these fellows, as he saw with what glee and self- satisfaction they entered into their own at Wakefield's. They were all so glad to be back, to see again the picture of Cain and Abel on the wall, to scramble for the corner seat in the ingle-bench, to hear the well-known creak on the middle landing, to catch the imperturbable tick of the dormitory clock, to see the top of Hawk's Pike looming out, down the valley, clear and sharp in ...
— The Cock-House at Fellsgarth • Talbot Baines Reed

... auld city, street by street, An' winter fu' o' snaw an' sleet, A while shut in my gangrel feet An' goavin' mettle; Noo is the soopit ingle sweet, An' liltin' kettle. ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 14 (of 25) • Robert Louis Stevenson

... the squire, arousing from his doze in the "ingle nook." "We had a seven years' struggle of it in the old war, and I fear that there will have to be some blood-letting before these bad humours are cufed. But we'll hope for the best. Come, Katharine, bring us a flagon of your ...
— Neville Trueman the Pioneer Preacher • William Henry Withrow

... a hantle mair pious and devout than ever a body I hae seen in Eyemouth, or a' the country side to boot; forbye, my minnie's auld auntie, that sat graning by the ingle, and ay banned us when we came ben. The meneester himsel' dinna gae about blessing and praying over ilka sma' matter like the meenest of us here, and for a' the din they make at hame about the ...
— A Modern Telemachus • Charlotte M. Yonge

... one of them hight Adam Bell, The other Clym of the Clough, The third was William of Cloudeslie, An archer good enough. They were outlawed for venison, These three yeomen every one; They swore them brethren upon a day, To Ingle wood ...
— A Bundle of Ballads • Various

... her loose; Summer's joys are spoilt by use, 10 And the enjoying of the Spring Fades as does its blossoming; Autumn's red-lipp'd fruitage too, Blushing through the mist and dew, Cloys with tasting: What do then? Sit thee by the ingle, when The sear faggot blazes bright, Spirit of a winter's night; When the soundless earth is muffled, And the caked snow is shuffled 20 From the ploughboy's heavy shoon; When the Night doth meet the Noon In a dark conspiracy To banish Even from ...
— Keats: Poems Published in 1820 • John Keats

... made, and though rumours of the next war at the Restoration came down to the west, those who had been enemies stirred not from the ingle-side again till Fred Forrester was called away; but Scarlett had become a student and a scholar, and the young friends met no more in strife. When they did encounter, and ran over the troubles of the past, it ...
— Crown and Sceptre - A West Country Story • George Manville Fenn

... soon you will be the bread-winner; your old father will then be able to sit idle by the ingle and smoke his pipe, whilst ...
— Parables from Flowers • Gertrude P. Dyer

... here's the man that can melt away his time and never feels it! What between his mistress abroad, and his ingle at home, high fare, soft lodging, fine clothes, and his fiddle; he thinks the hours have no wings, or the day no post-horse. Well, sir gallant, were you struck with the plague this minute, or condemn'd to any capital ...
— Epicoene - Or, The Silent Woman • Ben Jonson

... lies a' day, and whiles a' night, in the cove in the dern hag; but though it 's a bieldy eneugh bit, and the auld gudeman o' Corse-Cleugh has panged it wi' a kemple o' strae amaist, yet when the country's quiet, and the night very cauld, his Honour whiles creeps doun here to get a warm at the ingle, and a sleep amang the blankets, and gangs awa in the morning. And so, ae morning, siccan a fright as I got! Twa unlucky red-coats were up for black-fishing, or some siccan ploy—for the neb o' them's never ...
— Waverley • Sir Walter Scott

... and the ingle, was a bay window overlooking one angle of the lawn, a side path connecting the back premises of the house with the drive, and a dense growth of evergreens, poplars, limes, and copper beeches, the branches ...
— Byways of Ghost-Land • Elliott O'Donnell

... or Miss looked cosey enough to persons entering out of the cold and dark. There was heat, light, and a bar-parlor with a wide old-fashioned chimney-place, provided with seats within the ingle. On these little benches did Tommy and his friends make haste to place themselves, comfortably disposed, and thawing rapidly, in a room within a room, as it were; for the big chimney-place was like a little chamber by itself. Not on an ordinary night could such a party have gained admittance ...
— The Mark Of Cain • Andrew Lang

... He was my cicerone for the nonce; had come out of his chair by the ingle-nook to taste a little the salt of life. The north-easter flashed in the white cataracts of his eyes and woke a feeble activity in his scrannel limbs. When the wind blew loud, his daughter had told me, he was always restless, like an imprisoned sea-gull. He would be up and out. He would ...
— At a Winter's Fire • Bernard Edward J. Capes

... not find the subject tedious. It was very late when he returned home, but he knew by the light in the house-place that Janet was waiting up for him. Coming out of the wet, dark night, it was pleasant to see the blazing ingle, the white-sanded floor, and the little round table holding some cold moor-cock and the pastry that ...
— Winter Evening Tales • Amelia Edith Huddleston Barr

... freend, or a drappie to gie him. Gude een to you a', an' tak your nappy. A willy-waught's a gude night cappy[35]. May we a' be canty an' cosy, An' ilk hae a wife in his bosy. A cosy but, and a canty ben, To couthie[36] women and trusty men. The ingle neuk wi' routh[37] o' bannoch and bairns. Here's to him wha winna beguile ye. Mair sense and mair siller. ...
— Reminiscences of Scottish Life and Character • Edward Bannerman Ramsay

... sea-waves' fire,[38] thy fretting Cannot cast a weight on us, Warriors wight; yes, wolf and eagle Willingly I feed to-day; Carline thrust into the ingle, Or a tramping whore, art thou; Lord of skates that skim the sea-belt,[39] Odin's ...
— The story of Burnt Njal - From the Icelandic of the Njals Saga • Anonymous



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