Free TranslationFree Translation
Synonyms, antonyms, pronunciation

  Home
English Dictionary      examples: 'day', 'get rid of', 'New York Bay'




Ire   Listen
noun
Ire  n.  Anger; wrath. (Poet.)
Synonyms: Anger; passion; rage; fury. See Anger.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








Advanced search
     Find words:
Starting with
Ending with
Containing
Matching a pattern  

Synonyms
Antonyms
Quotes
Words linked to  

only single words



Share |





"Ire" Quotes from Famous Books



... that I had violated no law; that my ministerial engagements compelled me to leave, and I should have done so before had not this unpleasant affair detained me; that I chose to serve God rather than fear the ire ...
— The Mormon Menace - The Confessions of John Doyle Lee, Danite • John Doyle Lee

... a time, a neighing steed, Who grazed among a numerous breed, With mutiny had fired the train, And spread dissension through the plain. On matters that concerned the state The Council met in grand debate. A Colt, whose eyeballs flamed with ire, Elate with strength and youthful fire, In haste stepped forth before the rest, And thus ...
— The Talking Beasts • Various

... to London had aroused not only the ire of Britain, but that of her French allies. It was decided to take reprisals. Forty-five French machines left the eastern border during the night of June 15, 1915, and set their journey toward Karlsruhe. Some of the craft were large battle planes; all of them had speed ...
— The Story of the Great War, Volume IV (of 8) • Francis J. (Francis Joseph) Reynolds, Allen L. (Allen Leon)

... told the story of the rival galas and the aloe, and concluded by observing, that her lord was in some measure called upon to remedy part of the unnumbered ills which had sprung from her hatred of Mrs. Luttridge, as he had originally been the cause of her unextinguishable ire. Lord Delacour was flattered by this hint, and the annuity was immediately promised to the ...
— Tales and Novels, Vol. III - Belinda • Maria Edgeworth

... intercept her brother, Prudence would almost have been happy as she raced along that westward-bound trail. She knew her brother's nature well. She knew that he was vindictive, and no doubt her own treatment of him had roused his ire and all the lower instincts of his malignant nature; but she also knew that he loved money—needed money. His greed for gold was a gluttonous madness which he was incapable of resisting, and he would sacrifice any personal feeling provided the inducement were sufficiently large. ...
— The Hound From The North • Ridgwell Cullum

... His ire may be imagined, when he suddenly heard the well-known idioms lavished upon Madame Duvet and Mr Deep, who were enjoying them a great deal more than the concert, which, being principally in the vernacular, was not so intelligible ...
— Gladys, the Reaper • Anne Beale

... the book, forgetful that the Japanese commence at what we call the last page. The dealers display the utmost indifference as to whether you buy or not, and you may pull their shops to pieces without raising their ire in the slightest, for they will bow to you just as ceremoniously on leaving as though you had purchased twenty ...
— In Eastern Seas - The Commission of H.M.S. 'Iron Duke,' flag-ship in China, 1878-83 • J. J. Smith

... somesin dissent!" She moved a step backward on the floor, scoured and smeared with brick-dust, her ire rising visibly at every heart-throb, and pointing her outward-turned ...
— Dr. Sevier • George W. Cable

... Irish landlord gone to grass, Slain by the bullets of the tenant class! Pray, good agrarians, what wrong requires Such foul redress? Between you and the squires All Ireland's parted with an even hand— For you have all the ire, they all ...
— Shapes of Clay • Ambrose Bierce

... before the breath of life. Once in a lifetime, maybe, the sight meets a man's eyes which Yarrow saw that morning. The very clear blue of the air thrilled with electric vigor; from the rounded rose-colored summits of the western hills to the tiniest ire-cased grass-spear at his feet, the land flashed back unnumbered soft and splendid dyes to heaven; the hemlock-forests near had grouped themselves into glittering temples, mosques, churches, whatever form in which men have tried to please God by worshipping Him; the smoke from the distant ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 13, No. 75, January, 1864 • Various

... feet the road Like an arrowy Alpine river flowed, And the landscape sped away behind Like an ocean flying before the wind. And the steed, like a bark fed with furnace fire, Swept on, with his wild eye full of ire. But lo! he is nearing his heart's desire; He is snuffing the smoke of the roaring fray, With Sheridan only five ...
— Poems Every Child Should Know - The What-Every-Child-Should-Know-Library • Various

... children had been identified; none had taken hurt. All had been humanely given their nourishment. The thing was over. The day was beautiful. A tempting feast remained from the barbecue. These Bear Creek fathers could not keep their ire at red heat. Most of them, being as yet more their wives' lovers than their children's parents, began to see the mirthful side of the adventure; and they ceased to feel very ...
— The Virginian - A Horseman Of The Plains • Owen Wister

... time before she could determine what course to pursue, balancing in her mind whether it would be more prudent to avoid the impending storm by flight, or boldly and confidently to encounter her master's ire. Flight certainly is the method preferred on similar occasions; but then by adopting it she would tacitly confess herself guilty, and her tender reputation would be sullied with an indelible stain; by bravely encountering, on the other hand, the irritated father, she could stoutly ...
— Gomez Arias - The Moors of the Alpujarras, A Spanish Historical Romance. • Joaquin Telesforo de Trueba y Cosio

... sidere classem, Et mediis properas aquilonibus ire per altum ... Crudelis! quod si non arva aliena domosque Ignotas peteres, et Troja antiqua maneret, Troja ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine - April 1843 • Various

... nearer the window, for the daylight was fading fast, she sought for the reason of this unexpected generosity. But the old man's childish fancy, which would have touched a heart less hard than hers, aroused only her deepest ire—not because he had counted out the hairs, but because there had not been more to count. Jumping to her feet in her wrath, she exclaimed, "Fool that I was, to have withheld one, when the old dotard would have paid for it so richly. But it cannot now ...
— Dora Deane • Mary J. Holmes

... This is John Marten, the author of two treatises on the gout, and a "Treatise of all the Degrees and Symptoms of the Venereal Disease" (1708?-9). His notoriety brought on him the ire of a "licens'd practitioner in physick and surgery," one J. Spinke, who, in a pamphlet entitled "Quackery Unmask'd" (1709), dealt Marten some most uncourteous blows. From the pamphlet, it is difficult to judge whether Spinke or Marten were the greater quack; we should judge the former. Certainly ...
— The Prose Works of Jonathan Swift, Vol. III.: Swift's Writings on Religion and the Church, Vol. I. • Jonathan Swift

... jealous ire, and his voice, a low mumble before, now burst into a loud roar. "Yes, Crankin makes money, has a sight o' incubators, makes 'em himself, sells a lot, but some say they don't act like his do when they git off his place; most on 'em seem possessed, but Crankin, ...
— Adopting An Abandoned Farm • Kate Sanborn

... with trouble over this fad, although at several times Moakley told him that he might improve if he would eat some real food. However, when this man started a grape nut campaign among the younger members of the squad he aroused Jack's ire and upon his arrival at the field house he wiped the black board clean of all instructions and in letters a foot ...
— Football Days - Memories of the Game and of the Men behind the Ball • William H. Edwards

... Ire spite of his intentions to reform, Veli could not entirely give up his old habits. Although his fortune placed him altogether above small gains and losses, he continued to amuse himself by raiding from time to time sheep, goats, and other perquisites, probably to keep his hand in. This innocent exercise ...
— Celebrated Crimes, Complete • Alexandre Dumas, Pere

... the famous light the vessels bore straight down upon the Rock, and the wild waves danced and laughed, and displayed their white teeth and their seething ire, as if in exultation at the thought of the shattered hulls and mangled corpses, which they hoped ere long to ...
— The Story of the Rock • R.M. Ballantyne

... of Hygelac o'er peaceful plains in pride advancing, till Hrethelings fought in the fenced town. {39a} Then Ongentheow with edge of sword, the hoary-bearded, was held at bay, and the folk-king there was forced to suffer Eofor's anger. In ire, at the king Wulf Wonreding with weapon struck; and the chieftain's blood, for that blow, in streams flowed 'neath his hair. No fear felt he, stout old Scylfing, but straightway repaid in better bargain that bitter stroke ...
— Beowulf • Anonymous

... she was an earl's daughter, And a noble knight my sire— The baron he frowned, and turned away With mickle[34] dole and ire. ...
— The Book of Brave Old Ballads • Unknown

... Within me, as my body in this mire; My soul crawls dumb-struck, sore bestead and cowed As Sodom and Gomorrah scourged by fire, As Jericho before God's trumpet-peal, So we the elect ones perish in His ire. Vainly we gird on sackcloth, vainly kneel With famished faces toward Jerusalem: His heart is shut against us not to feel, His ears against our cry He shutteth them, His hand He shorteneth that He will not save, His law is loud against ...
— Poems • Christina G. Rossetti

... nunc, Daedale, dixit, Materiam, qua sis ingeniosus, habes. Possidet en terras, et possidet aequara, Minos: Nec tellus nostrae, nec patet undo fugae. Restat iter coelo: tentabimus ire. Da veniam caepto, Jupiter alte, meo. OVID. Ar. Am. ...
— The Works of Samuel Johnson, LL.D, In Nine Volumes - Volume the Third: The Rambler, Vol. II • Samuel Johnson

... but smile, albeit through my tears, at the climax of these threats which seemed to delight and stir the inmost soul of Ernie. His eyes flashed, his cheek crimsoned, his wide red mouth curled with disdainful ire, disclosing the small, pointed pearls within; ...
— Sea and Shore - A Sequel to "Miriam's Memoirs" • Mrs. Catharine A. Warfield

... almost to madness, and he had great difficulty in repressing his choler. But if this slight action, heightened to importance, as it was, by the looks of the parties, roused his ire, it was nothing to what followed. Instead of restoring it to the queen, Norris, unconscious of the danger in which he stood, pressed the ...
— Windsor Castle • William Harrison Ainsworth

... writing was one of Landor's favorite topics, and his ire was rarely more quickly excited than by placing before him a specimen of high-flown sentimentality. He would put on his spectacles, exclaim, "What is this?" and, having read a few lines, would throw the book down, saying, "I have not the patience to read such stuff. It may be very fine, but I cannot ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 17, No. 104, June, 1866 • Various

... sound, whatever can, Trumpet and fife and drum, This day our sabres, man for man, To stain with blood we come; With hangman's and with Frenchmen's blood, O glorious day of ire, That to all Germans soundeth good— ...
— The World's Best Poetry, Volume 8 • Various

... The great ire of the seneschal melted like snow in the sun, for the direst anger of God himself would have vanished at a ...
— Droll Stories, Volume 1 • Honore de Balzac

... of the air, A ready welcome see that you prepare. Black phantom figures from the earth, Of friendly salutations see there is no dearth. Red phantom figures of the furious fire, For kindly greeting change your usual ire. Grey, grizzly googies from the woods and dells, To gentle whisperings change your harrowing yells. Flagae, Devas, Mara Rupas,[19] hie to the Plane, the Astral Plane, And to these three poor fools, explain, explain The secrets that ...
— The Sorcery Club • Elliott O'Donnell

... profundo Mens hebet et propria luce relicta Tendit in externas ire tenebras, Terrenis quotiens flatibus aucta Crescit in inmensum noxia cura. 5 Hic quondam caelo liber aperto Suetus in aetherios ire meatus Cernebat rosei lumina solis, Visebat gelidae sidera lunae Et quaecumque uagos stella recursus 10 Exercet uarios flexa per orbes, Comprensam ...
— The Theological Tractates and The Consolation of Philosophy • Anicius Manlius Severinus Boethius

... as alluring models to attract the artist, its sunsets, the haze that rests over its fields, its farms, its spick and span houses, its costumes—all seem to belong to the paraphernalia of pictorial art. It is a paradise for motorists who behave themselves, and do not rouse the ire of the Dutchman. The regulations are exceedingly lenient, but the laws against fast speeding must not be disregarded, and the loud blowing of horns, on deserted streets in the middle of the night, is ...
— The Automobilist Abroad • M. F. (Milburg Francisco) Mansfield

... 'm very fond of handsome eyes) Was large and dark, suppressing half its fire Until she spoke, then through its soft disguise Flash'd an expression more of pride than ire, And love than either; and there would arise A something in them which was not desire, But would have been, perhaps, but for the soul Which struggled through ...
— Don Juan • Lord Byron

... any the less of him for it. Under like circumstances they would have showed the same reluctance to pass the intervening counter. It was not Bud's lack of courage, but Mr. Bailey's pluck, that excited their ire. The latter had insulted their friend by refusing him the credit he had granted a field-hand, and now he had gone so far as to threaten Bud with a weapon. It opened their eyes to the fact that Union men were dangerous things to ...
— True To His Colors • Harry Castlemon

... impatient, Royal Highness, pray. My mistress is a tiger-cat—(permit The term; tho' coarse, 'tis graphically fit.) She gnashes her white teeth with frantic ire, And raves against you, "Robbers, murder, fire!" If truth I speak not, may the high Fo-hi Make mince-meat of me for his ...
— Turandot: The Chinese Sphinx • Johann Christoph Friedrich von Schiller

... saying of Ovid, whose truth, when he tested it in person, was the cause of his exile. It sometimes brought us into conflict with the owners of the trees, and it was only natural that "Froebel's youngsters" often excited the peasants' ire. ...
— Uarda • Georg Ebers

... interior of Russia. Disappointed, as I have said, by the abandonment of the camp of Drissa by the Russian army, he marched rapidly towards Witepsk, where the greater part of the French forces were then collected: but here the ire of the Emperor was again aroused by a new retreat of the Russians; for the encounters of Ostrovno and Mohilev, although important, could not be considered as the kind of battle the Emperor so ardently desired. On entering Witepsk, the Emperor learned that the Emperor Alexander, who a ...
— The Memoirs of Napoleon Bonaparte • Bourrienne, Constant, and Stewarton

... fundamental struggle for liberty of individual opinion, no presentation of the evidence could be historically correct which did not include at least one example of the fate that awaited peaceful families, under this ecclesiastical government, who roused the ire of the priests. ...
— The Emancipation of Massachusetts • Brooks Adams

... curious story under the year 1213. O'Donnell More sent his steward to Connaught to collect his tribute. On his way he visited the poet Murray O'Daly, and began to wrangle with him, "although his lord had given him no instructions to do so." The poet's ire was excited. He killed him on the spot with a sharp axe—an unpleasant exhibition of literary justice—and then fled into Clanrickarde for safety. O'Donnell determined to revenge the insult, until Mac William (William de Burgo) ...
— An Illustrated History of Ireland from AD 400 to 1800 • Mary Frances Cusack

... the sacred page; How Abram was the friend of God on high; Or Moses bade eternal warfare wage With Amalek's ungracious progeny; Or how the royal bard did groaning lie Beneath the stroke of Heaven's avenging ire; Or Job's pathetic plaint and wailing cry; Or rapt Isaiah's wild, seraphic fire; Or other holy seers that tune ...
— English Poets of the Eighteenth Century • Selected and Edited with an Introduction by Ernest Bernbaum

... Baculus portamus, Caput hustiarii ffranger{e} debemus; Si p{re}ceptor nos petit quo debemus Ire, Breuiter respondem{us}, "no{n} est tibi scire." O p{ro} nobilis docter, Now we youe pray, Vt velitis conceder{e} to gyff h{us} leff to play. Nunc p{ro}ponimus Ire, w{i}t{h}out any ney, Scolam dissolver{e}; I tell itt youe in fey, Sicut istud festum, merth-is for to make, Accipim{us} n{ost}ram ...
— Early English Meals and Manners • Various

... under it; but said nothing. Grace, however, saw his ire, his mortification, and his jealousy in his face, and that irritated her; but she did not choose to show either of the men ...
— Put Yourself in His Place • Charles Reade

... accurately dressed, I fancied I had a grievance, and made toward him with a lowered bayonet, but my better judgment recalled me before actual contact could take place. Of course Terrill reported me for this, and my ire was so inflamed by his action that when we next met I attacked him, and a fisticuff engagement in front of barracks followed, which was stopped by an officer appearing on the scene. Each of us handed in ...
— The Memoirs of General Philip H. Sheridan, Vol. I., Part 1 • Philip H. Sheridan

... Samson will have the goodness to give her to this person. Abbot Samson, with deep humility, replies that she is already given. New letters from Richard, of severer tenor; answered with new deep humilities, with gifts and entreaties, with no promise of obedience. King Richard's ire is kindled; messengers arrive at St. Edmundsbury, with emphatic message to obey or tremble! Abbot Samson, wisely silent as to the King's threats, makes answer: "The King can send if he will, and seize the ward: force and ...
— Past and Present - Thomas Carlyle's Collected Works, Vol. XIII. • Thomas Carlyle

... the men at headquarters know what they are about," Christopher said, making an attempt to soothe the ire of the distressed clerk. ...
— Christopher and the Clockmakers • Sara Ware Bassett

... Sedi, ut siquis ex qualibet Galliarum parte sub quolibet ecclesiastico gradu ad nos Romae venire contendit, vel alio terrarum ire disponit, non aliter proficiscatur nisi Metropolitani Episcopi Formatas acceperit, quibus sacerdotium suum vel locum ecclesiasticum quem habet, scriptorum ejus adstipulatione perdoceat: quod ex gratia statuimus quia plures episcopi ...
— Observations upon the Prophecies of Daniel, and the Apocalypse of St. John • Isaac Newton

... unwilling hand coldly—on which he had, doubtless, missed the conspicuous ring, significant of my engagement. His chameleon eyes seemed to emit sparks of phosphorescent fire, as if every one of the dull-yellow sparks therein had become suddenly ignited. I saw then, for the first time, what his ire could be, and what reason I had ...
— Miriam Monfort - A Novel • Catherine A. Warfield

... bid her swerve From her intent—but every strained nerve Was settled and bent up with terrible force, To some deep deed, far, far beyond remorse; No glimpse of mercy's light her purpose crost, Love, nature, pity, in its depths were lost; Or lent an added fury to the ire That seared her soul with unconsuming fire; All that was dear in the wide earth was gone, She loved but two, and these she doted on With passionate ardour—and the close strong press Of woman's heart-cored, clinging tenderness; These links were torn, and now she stood alone, Bereft ...
— The Culprit Fay - and Other Poems • Joseph Rodman Drake

... the state aroused the cardinal's ire—one the Huguenots, and the other the nobles—for both threatened the autocracy which he was bent upon erecting. Both factions suffered defeat ...
— A Political and Social History of Modern Europe V.1. • Carlton J. H. Hayes

... all in the poor-house what'll you do then?" said Mrs. Masters,—with her handkerchief out at the spur of the moment. Whenever she roused her husband to a state of bellicose ire by her taunts she could always reduce him again by her tears. Being well aware of this he would bear the taunts as long as he could, knowing that the tears would be still worse. He was so soft-hearted that when she affected to be miserable, ...
— The American Senator • Anthony Trollope

... there was a great deal of intolerance—almost as much as exists in society circles at the present day—and that is saying a great deal. Churchmen, in their ignorance, were ready to put down Dissent in every way, and occasionally, by their absurdity, they roused the righteous ire of the Quaker poet. One of them, for instance, had said at a public meeting: 'This was the opinion he had formed of Dissenters, that they were wolves in sheep's clothing.' Whereupon B. ...
— East Anglia - Personal Recollections and Historical Associations • J. Ewing Ritchie

... before the Long Parliament was so rudely "interrupted" by Cromwell (20 April, 1653) it raised the ire of the Common Council of the city by the action of its commissioners, sitting at Haberdashers' Hall, who had prosecuted and fined certain inhabitants of the ward of Farringdon Within for having contravened the Act touching election of officers upon the Treasonable Engagement.(1071) ...
— London and the Kingdom - Volume II • Reginald R. Sharpe

... temperate narrative of facts appears to have made no impression on him. He is content magisterially to pronounce it absurd and incredible, and inconsistent with itself as well as with probability. He appears in his ire to forget that the king of Scots and his subjects were better able to judge of its truthfulness than he, a foreigner, could be; and that after saying all he could for the bishops and superior clergy in his former reply, he had been obliged to conclude with the damaging admission that ...
— The Scottish Reformation - Its Epochs, Episodes, Leaders, and Distinctive Characteristics • Alexander F. Mitchell

... point, and was indicated to Wilhelmina as such, That the Crown-Prince would, on her actual wedding, probably get back from Custrin. But her Majesty's reconcilement,—this was very slow to follow. Her Majesty was still in flames of ire at their next interview; and poor Wilhelmina fainted, on approaching to kiss her hand. "Disgraced, vanquished, and my enemies triumphing!" said her Majesty; and vented her wrath on Wilhelmina; and fell ill (so soon as there ...
— History Of Friedrich II. of Prussia, Vol. VIII. (of XXI.) • Thomas Carlyle

... narrative is confirmed by the testimony which an Irish Captain who was present has left us in bad Latin. "Hic apud sacrum omnes advertizantur a capellanis ire potius ...
— The History of England from the Accession of James II. - Volume 4 (of 5) • Thomas Babington Macaulay

... the proofs and break up the forms." I could not go to this iconoclastic extreme with the electrotypes of the magazine, but I could return the proofs. I did so, feeling that I had done my possible, and silently grieving that there could be such ire in ...
— Henry James, Jr. • William Dean Howells

... habit, during these outbursts of native ire, to remain perfectly quiet, not only until the explosion was over, but while the smoke was disappearing from the scene. I fastened my eye, therefore, silently, but intensely, on the tiger, following him in all his movements about the apartment, till he sank subdued ...
— Captain Canot - or, Twenty Years of an African Slaver • Brantz Mayer

... hear in a way which honors the person heard; e.g., goiqen vo uqetam[vo]tta 'I heard your advice.' Mxi ague,uru means to speak in a way which humbles oneself while bestowing honor on the person being addressed. Mxi ire,uru means to speak between equals (equales). Chmon xi,uru means to listen to the word of God. Goranji,zuru or goranjerare,uru is to look at a noble thing. Xi,uru means to do in common way, itaxi,u means to do in a cultivated way, and tucamaturi,u ...
— Diego Collado's Grammar of the Japanese Language • Diego Collado

... like these was Custer's mind engaged. The gentlest are the sternest when enraged. All felt the swift contagion of his ire, For he was one who could arouse and fire The coldest heart, so ardent was his own. His fearless eye, his calm intrepid tone, Bespoke the leader, strong with conscious power, Whom following friends will bless, while foes ...
— Custer, and Other Poems. • Ella Wheeler Wilcox

... sexual frigidity, already disposed of, is normal in the female, and that the approach of the male is made possible, not by its melting into passion, but by a purely intellectual determination, inwardly revolting, to avoid his ire by pandering to his gross appetites. Thus the thing is stated in a book called "The Sexes in Science and History," by Eliza Burt Gamble, ...
— In Defense of Women • H. L. Mencken

... nor prize, But where his rude hut by the Danube lay, There were his young barbarians all at play; There was their Dacian mother—he, their sire, Butchered to make a Roman holiday. All this rushed with his blood. Shall he expire, And unavenged? Arise, ye Goths, and glut your ire." ...
— Rollo in Rome • Jacob Abbott

... language was interpreted, a deep but smothered resentment was felt; more especially at the taunts touching the manner in which the whites had overcome the red men. Truth is hard to be borne, and the individual, or people, who will treat a thousand injurious lies with contempt, feel all their ire aroused at one reproach that has its foundation in fact. Nevertheless, the anger that the corporal's words did, in truth, awaken, was successfully repressed, and he had the disappointment of seeing that his life was ...
— Oak Openings • James Fenimore Cooper

... difficulties attending the use of words, there are others attending the choice and arrangement of words. There is the danger of falling into "poetic prose," of thinking it necessary to write "steed" or "charger" instead of "horse," "ire" instead of "anger," and the like; and every teacher, who has had much experience in looking over examination papers, will admit that this is a danger to which beginners are very liable. Again, there is the temptation to shrink with a senseless ...
— How to Write Clearly - Rules and Exercises on English Composition • Edwin A. Abbott

... day I succeeded in reaching the wren quarter without arousing the ire of the squirrels, and I placed my seat very near the nest to see if the bird had learned not to fear me. Fixing my eyes on the place she must enter, I waited, motionless. Some time passed, and though I heard many bird notes about me, and the ...
— Upon The Tree-Tops • Olive Thorne Miller

... Eloquence when thou art named her sire * But mourns she whenas other man the title claimed. O Lord of fairest presence, whose illuming rays * Clear off the fogs of doubt aye veiling deeds high famed, Ne'er cease thy face to shine like Dawn and rise of Morn * And never show Time's face with heat of ire inflamed! Thy grace hath favoured us with gifts that worked such wise * As rain clouds raining on the hills by words enframed: Freely thou lavishedst thy wealth to rise on high * Till won from Time the heights whereat thy ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 1 • Richard F. Burton

... the fiend, and he fell like a stone: Then rising the Fairy in ire, With a touch of her finger she loosen'd her zone, (While the limbs on the wall gave a terrible groan!) And she swell'd ...
— Translations of German Poetry in American Magazines 1741-1810 • Edward Ziegler Davis

... thou flound'rest in yon pool, Learn thou this wisdom of a Fool; Cold water oft can passion cool And fiery ardours slake; Thus, sir, since water quencheth fire, So let it soothe away thine ire. Then—go seek thee garments drier ...
— The Geste of Duke Jocelyn • Jeffery Farnol

... gorge that extends for three miles along Big Sioux River, Iowa, was hewn through the stone by a spirit that took the form of a dragon. Such were its size and ferocity that the Indians avoided the place, lest they should fall victims to its ire. ...
— Myths And Legends Of Our Own Land, Complete • Charles M. Skinner

... was in a taking about the kidnapping of his little son, he certainly showed no symptoms of invading Mother Bunch's premises on his behalf; and it was thought best for the captain's sake to do nothing to rouse his father's ire ...
— A Girl of the People • L. T. Meade

... Jefferson Davis declared that the Government was not made for them, and that "we have no right to tax our people to educate the barbarians of Africa." These and kindred utterances were very well calculated to aid the work of anti-slavery progress. John Brown's raid into Virginia kindled the ire of the slave-holders to a degree as yet unprecedented, and although his act found few defenders in the Northern States, the heroism with which he met his fate, the pithy correspondence between Gov. Wise and Mrs. Child, the language of Southern senators in dealing with the subject, ...
— Political Recollections - 1840 to 1872 • George W. Julian

... of sticks and mats by the side of a path. As I went in there only to ask for a bottle of lemonade I have not to this day the slightest idea what in my appearance or actions could have roused his terrible ire. It became manifest to me less than two minutes after I had set eyes on him for the first time, and though immensely surprised of course I didn't stop to think it out. I took the nearest short cut—through the wall. ...
— Notes on My Books • Joseph Conrad

... bandaged and fettered herd to whom, in our fond hopes and aspirations, we trusted to give light and freedom; seeing the slavish judgments we would have redeemed from error clashing their chains at us in ire;—made criminal by our very benevolence;—the martyrs whose zeal is rewarded with persecution, whose prophecies are crowned with contempt!—Better, oh, better that I had not listened to the vanity of ...
— The Disowned, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... dangers dire, Since Colin is gone? Who'll fearlessly brave the maniac wave, Thoughtless of self, human life to save, Unmoved by the storm-fiend's ire? Who, Shadrach-like, will walk through fire, Since Colin is gone? Or hang his life on so frail a breath That there's but a step 'twixt life and death? For Courage is not the heritage Of the nobly born; and many a sage Has climbed to the temple of fame, And written his deathless name In letters ...
— Hesperus - and Other Poems and Lyrics • Charles Sangster

... frightened by a century-old legend. He wouldn't let that bother him if he had influence enough in the family to win the daughter and induce the mother to give a ball in the haunted hall. With this last hit he hoped to arouse the young husband's ire. But the latter merely shrugged his shoulders and turned away with a ...
— The Continental Classics, Volume XVIII., Mystery Tales • Various

... so well known in Chapelizod that Sturk was poking after Lord Castlemallard's agency that Nutter felt the scene going on before his eyes between him and Dangerfield like a public affront. His ire was that of a phlegmatic man, dangerous when stirred, and there was no mistaking, in his rigid, swarthy countenance, ...
— The House by the Church-Yard • J. Sheridan Le Fanu

... the great, persuades his brother-in-law to buy an option to a ninety-acre lot on the assumption that "Guggenheim" is to build a golf course there, obtains $10,000 from the local banker and then becomes badly involved in his deceptions. After Peter endures the ridicule of his townsfolk and the ire of the banker there suddenly appears on the scene a representative of "Guggenheim" who wants the acreage not for a golf course but an air field, and promptly turns over a check for $75,000 ...
— The Ghost of Jerry Bundler • W. W. Jacobs and Charles Rock

... at Ujiji; they went S.W. to country called Nombe, it is near Rua, and where copper is smelted. After I left them on account of the massacre at Nyangwe, they bought much ivory, but acting in the usual Arab way, plundering and killing, they aroused the Bakuss' ire, and as they are very numerous, about 200 were killed, and none of Dugumbe's party. They brought fifty tusks to Ujiji. We dare not pronounce positively on any event in life, but this looks like prompt retribution on the perpetrators of the ...
— The Last Journals of David Livingstone, in Central Africa, from 1865 to His Death, Volume II (of 2), 1869-1873 • David Livingstone

... brilliant intellects of the Party at this period, a consummate orator, a reputed master of all the intricacies of international finance, and in every sense of the word a first-rate House of Commons man. But he had in some way or other aroused the implacable ire of Mr T.M. Healy, whose sardonic invective he could not stand. A politician has no right to possess a sensitive skin, but somehow Mr Sexton did, with the result that he allowed himself to be driven from public ...
— Ireland Since Parnell • Daniel Desmond Sheehan

... Lares proprios, habitandaque fana Apres reliquit, et rapacibus lupis, Ire, pedes ...
— Castles and Cave Dwellings of Europe • Sabine Baring-Gould

... feels no poignant ruth At the dethronement of a truth, That to old age from tender youth Has felt no fervid ire When hate and envy swayed the tongue, And took no pride in checking wrong, No matter where it may belong, Is character I ...
— Our Profession and Other Poems • Jared Barhite

... Marsilies, is turn'ed white with ire, He breaks the seal and casts the wax aside, Looks in the brief, sees what the King did write: "Charles commands, who holds all France by might, I bear in mind his bitter grief and ire; 'Tis of Basan and 's brother Basilye, Whose heads I took on th' hill by Haltilye. ...
— The Song of Roland • Anonymous

... obtained not the least redress: he answered our complaints only by a volley of imprecations against us, and immediately took a horse-whip, in order to chastise us, so that we were obliged to turn out much faster than we came in. I now, in the agony of distress and indignation, wished that the ire of God in his forked lightning might transfix these cruel oppressors among the dead. Still however we persevered; went back again to the house, and begged and besought them again and again for our fruits, till at last some ...
— The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, Or Gustavus Vassa, The African - Written By Himself • Olaudah Equiano

... think I thought much about her in anyway," replied Arthur, with that air of masculine superiority which never failed to rouse his sister's ire. "She seems a nice quiet sort ...
— More About Peggy • Mrs G. de Horne Vaizey

... ancient days it is fortunate that the mellowing influence of time dims the vision, and we see down the long vista of years as through a softening twilight, else we should behold such harshness as would arouse more of ire than of admiration. The olden time, like the landscape, appears ...
— Due West - or Round the World in Ten Months • Maturin Murray Ballou

... as the panther's spring, When he leaps on the fawn from his cavern lair; Wiwaste he caught by her flowing hair, And dragged her forth from the Sacred Ring. She turned on the warrior, her eyes flashed fire; Her proud lips quivered with queenly ire; And her sun-browned cheeks were aflame with red. Her hand to the spirits she raised and said: "I am pure!—I am pure as the falling snow! Great Taku-skan-skan[51] will testify! And dares the tall coward to say me no?" But the sullen warrior made no reply. She turned to the chief with ...
— The Feast of the Virgins and Other Poems • H. L. Gordon

... King in full great ire, 'Traitor, why made thou on the fire?' 'Ah sire,' he said, 'so God me see That fire was never made on for me. No ere this night I wist it not But when I wist it weel* I thoecht That you and all your company In haste would put you to the sea. For this I come ...
— English Literature For Boys And Girls • H.E. Marshall

... tusker in his fury, like a lion in his ire, Like the sun in noontide radiance, like the ...
— Maha-bharata - The Epic of Ancient India Condensed into English Verse • Anonymous

... Morisoni of Gray) produces similar little barbed nutlets, following insignificant, tiny, palest blue or white flowers up the spike. These bristling seeds, shaped like sad-irons, reflect in their title the ire of the persecuted man who named them Beggar's Lice. If as Emerson said, a weed, is a plant whose virtues have not yet been discovered, the hound's tongue, the similar but blue-flowered WILD COMFREY (C. Virginicum), next of kin, and the stickseed are no weeds; for ages ago the caterpillars ...
— Wild Flowers, An Aid to Knowledge of Our Wild Flowers and - Their Insect Visitors - - Title: Nature's Garden • Neltje Blanchan

... is in a passion, Tremble, ye rogues, and tremble all the nation! Suppose he takes it in his, royal head To strike your academic idol dead— Knock down your house, dissolve you in his ire, And strip you ...
— Art in England - Notes and Studies • Dutton Cook

... his forehead, shaded with short thick hair, uncurled, but black and glossy as the wings of a raven. It was on that forehead that time had set its trace; it was knit into a frown over the eyebrows; lines deep as furrows crossed its broad, but not elevated expanse. That frown spoke of hasty ire and the habit of stern command; those furrows spoke of deep thought and plotting scheme; the one betrayed but temper and circumstance; the other, more noble, spoke of the character and the intellect. The face was square, and the regard lion-like; the mouth—small, and even beautiful in outline—had ...
— Harold, Complete - The Last Of The Saxon Kings • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... house where the two men hang, and taking down from his hook the left-hand of the two, they put that venturous jeweller in his place; so that there fell on him the doom that he feared, as all men know though it is so long since, and there abated somewhat the ire of ...
— The Book of Wonder • Edward J. M. D. Plunkett, Lord Dunsany

... and charging them to let no Indians go in or out, he went into Satouriona's hut with the others. In perfect silence he came in, in perfect silence he sat down and remained so for a long time which, says Laudonnire, put the ...
— This Country Of Ours • H. E. Marshall Author: Henrietta Elizabeth Marshall

... upon as the best name although there was considerable discussion on it. This discussion waxed particularly warm between a colonel and a corporal and it came to an end only when some hungry enlisted delegate braved the officer's rising ire to move an adjournment for lunch. The motion carried immediately and, true to the understanding made at the outset in regard to rank, the corporal clicked his heels together, stood at attention and saluted the colonel, when the latter passed him on ...
— The Story of The American Legion • George Seay Wheat

... the spaniel, if he rouse thine ire, His servile nature may no more aspire— But leave the lion in his lordly lair, Or he thine entrails in his rage will tear. Go, rob the linnet's unprotected nest, And rend her offspring, from her little ...
— Lays of Ancient Virginia, and Other Poems • James Avis Bartley

... Plagues: they, astonished, all resistance lost, All courage; down their idle weapons dropt; O'er shields, and helms, and helmed heads he rode Of thrones and mighty seraphim prostrate, That wished the mountains now might be again Thrown on them, as a shelter from his ire. Nor less on either side tempestuous fell His arrows, from the fourfold-visaged Four Distinct with eyes, and from the living wheels Distinct alike with multitude of eyes; One spirit in them ruled; and every eye Glared lightning, and shot forth pernicious fire Among the accursed, that withered ...
— The World's Best Poetry, Volume 8 • Various

... journal open and pored upon Lord only knows what, found drowned or the exploits of King Willow, Iremonger having made a hundred and something second wicket not out for Notts, during which time (completely regardless of Ire) the keeper was intensely occupied loosening an apparently new or secondhand boot which manifestly pinched him as he muttered against whoever it was sold it, all of them who were sufficiently awake enough to be picked out by their facial expressions, that is to say, either simply ...
— Ulysses • James Joyce

... upper hand produced a feeling of unquiet, and the most was made of all grievances, so as to fan the flames of discontent. Pestilent priests paraded the country, and did their utmost to excite religious fanaticism against the Government. These agitators spoke so loudly and rashly that the ire of the old religious leaders, the higher Moullas, men of learning and tranquil temper, who had not joined the party of retrogression, was roused. The knowledge of this emboldened the sober-minded to speak out against the arrogance and conceit of the new ...
— Persia Revisited • Thomas Edward Gordon

... fornicata fuerit, mulierem occidunt et virum. [Sidenote: Furti. Arcani cuulgali.] Si aliquis inuenitur in prada vel in furto manifesto in terra potestatis eorum sine vlla miseratione occiditur. Item si aliquis eorum deundat consilium, maxime quando volunt ire ad bellum; centum plaga dantur super posteriora, quanto maiores dare cum baculo magno vnus rusticus potest. Item quando aliqui di minoribus offendunt in aliquo a suis maioribus non parciter eis, sed verberibus grauiter affliguntur. Item inter filium concubina et vxoris nulla ...
— The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries - Vol. II • Richard Hakluyt

... by former President Cleveland particularly stirred the ire of the attacking suffragists, and Miss Anthony hurled a broadside at the former President in a newspaper interview. Unfortunately for her best judgment, and the strength of her argument, the attack became intensely personal; and of course, nullified its force. But it irritated ...
— The Americanization of Edward Bok - The Autobiography of a Dutch Boy Fifty Years After • Edward William Bok

... which serves, in the hands of the monarch, to finish the subjugation of the numerous semi-feudal nobles created by the conquest, because before the faith there are no privileged persons, and no one is sheltered from the ire of the terrible tribunal. Its intervention is so absolute, and its dedication to its function so extravagant, that, rendering itself more Catholic than the pope, it usurps his authority and revolts against the orders of the pontiff, giving to the peninsular church the character ...
— Folkways - A Study of the Sociological Importance of Usages, Manners, Customs, Mores, and Morals • William Graham Sumner

... with ire was King Marsil's hue; The seal he brake and to earth he threw, Read of the scroll the tenor clear. "So Karl the Emperor writes me here. Bids me remember his wrath and pain For sake of Basan and Basil slain, Whose necks I smote on Haltoia's hill; Yet, if my life I would ransom still, Mine ...
— The Harvard Classics, Volume 49, Epic and Saga - With Introductions And Notes • Various

... tastes in literature, art, music, politics, and religion. This reminds one of an old-fashioned game. And all this long-winded preamble is to tell you that the case of Arnold Schoenberg, musical anarchist, and an Austrian composer who has at once aroused the ire and admiration of musical Germany, demands just such a confession from a critic about to hold in the balance the music or unmusic (the Germans have such a handy word) of Schoenberg. Therefore, before I attempt a critical or uncritical ...
— Ivory Apes and Peacocks • James Huneker

... altercation, however, between Eleanor and Edna Wright on the day after Eleanor had astonished Grace and her friends by her fiery outburst, Edna having admitted that she had been responsible for the changes that had aroused Eleanor's ire. ...
— Grace Harlowe's Senior Year at High School - or The Parting of the Ways • Jessie Graham Flower

... abroad, "And scorns the armies of the living God." Thus spoke the youth, th' attentive people ey'd The wond'rous hero, and again reply'd: "Such the rewards our monarch will bestow, "On him who conquers, and destroys his foe." Eliab heard, and kindled into ire To hear his shepherd brother thus inquire, And thus begun: "What errand brought thee? say "Who keeps thy flock? or does it go astray? "I know the base ambition of thine heart, "But back in safety from the field depart." ...
— Religious and Moral Poems • Phillis Wheatley

... must be careful not to write stories that will be likely to arouse the ire of certain photoplay patrons because of the way a political theme is handled does not mean that you cannot introduce political themes at all. If, for instance, you have a particularly good suffragist ...
— Writing the Photoplay • J. Berg Esenwein and Arthur Leeds

... Minister was come but the Duke of Richmond. Talleyrand and Esterhazy alone of the Corps Diplomatique were in the next room. He attacked the officer of the Guards for not having his cap on his head, and sent for the officer on guard, who was not arrived, at which he expressed great ire. It is supposed that the peerages have put him out of temper. His Majesty did a very strange thing about them. Though their patents are not made out, and the new Peers are no more Peers than I am, he desired them to appear as such in Westminster Abbey and do homage. Colonel Berkeley asked me ...
— The Greville Memoirs - A Journal of the Reigns of King George IV and King William IV, Vol. II • Charles C. F. Greville

... and valiant, all aflame with soft desire, Conscious of their worth and valour, all the suitors rose in ire, ...
— Maha-bharata - The Epic of Ancient India Condensed into English Verse • Anonymous

... to assuage his ire, the Regent disgraced Sir John Fastolfe, whom he unknighted and ungartered, in order to punish him for the defeat at Patay; and he wrote that the English reverses had been caused by 'a disciple and lyme of the Feende, called the Pucelle, that ...
— Joan of Arc • Ronald Sutherland Gower

... perhaps, as the printer of some of the writings of Dekker, Greene, and Heywood; but in 1621 he printed, without license, Wither's Motto, a tract from the pen of George Wither, which had been published by John Marriot a short time before. This satire aroused the ire of the Government, and all connected with it at once made the acquaintance of the nearest jail. In the State Papers for that year are preserved the examination of the author, the booksellers, and the ...
— A Short History of English Printing, 1476-1898 • Henry R. Plomer

... patience was exhausted. Her ire rose. "I'll see if you come back into my cellar again, old fellow," she exclaimed, before breakfast one morning after the recusant batrachian had been transported the night before. This time the old lady seized the tongs herself, and marched out into the yard, holding toady ...
— When Life Was Young - At the Old Farm in Maine • C. A. Stephens



Words linked to "Ire" :   infuriation, wrath, vexation, dander, fury, enragement, umbrage, ill temper, offence, madness, huffiness, choler, ira, indignation



Copyright © 2022 e-Free Translation.com