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Moralise   Listen
verb
moralise  v.  Moralize. (Chiefly Brit.)






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Moralise" Quotes from Famous Books



... by brigades of pink-legged women with a fixed smile on their faces. It takes the rank of high expressive art. And the motive of this Ballo was consistently worked out in an intelligible sequence of well-ordered scenes. To moralise upon its meaning would be out of place. It had a conflict of passions, a rhythmical progression of emotions, a tragic climax in the triumph ...
— Sketches and Studies in Italy and Greece, Complete - Series I, II, and III • John Symonds

... beneath these literary decorations, and I could pay it no livelier homage than is implied in perfect pity. Hero and heroine have become too much creatures of history to take up attitudes as part of any poetry. But, not to moralise too sternly for a tourist between trains, I should add that, as an illustration, to be inserted mentally in the text of the "Confessions," a glimpse of Les Charmettes is pleasant enough. It completes the rare charm of good ...
— Italian Hours • Henry James

... your admirers have to contend against. A French critic, M. Taine, also protests that you do preach too much. Did any author but yourself so frequently break the thread (seldom a strong thread) of his plot to converse with his reader and moralise his tale, we also might be offended. But who that loves Montaigne and Pascal, who that likes the wise trifling of the one and can bear with the melancholy of the other, but prefers ...
— Letters to Dead Authors • Andrew Lang

... the Childe, as o'er the mountains he Did take his way in solitary guise: Sweet was the scene, yet soon he thought to flee, More restless than the swallow in the skies: Though here awhile he learned to moralise, For Meditation fixed at times on him, And conscious Reason whispered to despise His early youth misspent in maddest whim; But as he gazed on Truth, his aching eyes ...
— Childe Harold's Pilgrimage • Lord Byron

... religious wars of the sixteenth century assisted in destroying this monopoly of power still more; yet now that it is gone for ever, it has left fearful traces of its irresponsible strength. All who sigh for "the good old times," should not moralise over the fallen greatness of the city, and its almost deserted but noble town-hall; but descend below the building into the dark vaults and corridors which form its basement; the terrible substructure ...
— Rambles of an Archaeologist Among Old Books and in Old Places • Frederick William Fairholt

... old Castle of Rothes clings a legend of a more pathetic kind. "Fierce wars and faithful loves shall moralise my song," says Spenser, and it is with these well-worn but ever-fresh subjects that the story deals. The heiress of one of the old lairds of Rothes, being allowed to roam at will with her foster-mother, cast an eye of love on the son of the laird of Arndilly. As in ballad lore, the love seems ...
— Literary Tours in The Highlands and Islands of Scotland • Daniel Turner Holmes

... popular preacher who enjoys weeping produces in us nothing but contempt. Massinger's heroes and heroines have not, we may say, backbone enough in them to make us care very deeply for their sorrows. And they moralise rather too freely. We do not want sermons, but sympathy, when we are in our deepest grief; and we do not feel that anyone feels very keenly who can take his sorrows for a text, and preach in his agony upon the vanity ...
— Hours in a Library - New Edition, with Additions. Vol. II (of 3) • Leslie Stephen

... for example, your Follimort is a withred leafe, which doth moralise a decay: your yellow ...
— A Collection of Old English Plays, Vol. II • Various

... you reject my tribute due, I'll moralise—despite of you. To moralise a theme is duty: My ...
— Fables of John Gay - (Somewhat Altered) • John Gay

... grovelling and base; and so this vulgar curiosity, which, combined with other feelings, prompted an ignorant and illiterate mob to exhume Miles, the once fat butcher, in a different form tempted the philosophic Hamlet to moralise upon ...
— Varney the Vampire - Or the Feast of Blood • Thomas Preskett Prest

... them, they are on actual service. Whenever they may be dispersed, there is not one among them that will ever be more comfortably lodged, or more highly prized by its possessor; and generations may pass away before some of them will again find a reader. It is well that we do not moralise ...
— Colloquies on Society • Robert Southey

... wish to moralise—but I repent of my share in the deceit; and had it to be done over again I ...
— Mr. Midshipman Easy • Captain Frederick Marryat

... yet an idol, had still a hold upon the stage, and was beginning to be imitated by Rowe and to attract the attention of commentators. The sturdy Briton would not be seduced to the foreign model. The attempt to refine tragedy was as hopeless as the attempt to moralise comedy. This points to the process by which the Wit becomes 'artificial.' He has a profound conviction, surely not altogether wrong, that a tragedy ought to be a work of art. The artist must observe certain rules; ...
— English Literature and Society in the Eighteenth Century • Leslie Stephen

... useless to moralise on this, and the purport and significance of it may be left for private meditation to enucleate and enjoy. But it cannot be fully appreciated, unless one remembers that the author of this and other charges against chivalry is also the historian of ...
— Sir Walter Scott - A Lecture at the Sorbonne • William Paton Ker

... Boots! we can write upon boots—we can moralise upon boots; we can convert them, as Jacques does the weeping stag in "As You Like It," (or, whether you like it or not,) into a thousand similes. First, for—but, "our sole's in arms and eager for the ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 1, Complete • Various

... on your long-winded lectures, and go ahead wi' the next plan," said the captain, "and don't moralise ...
— Jeff Benson, or the Young Coastguardsman • R.M. Ballantyne

... equally vigorous in its condemnation. The history of the belief in witch burning, heresy hunting, eternal damnation, etc., all illustrate the same point—religious teachings are all modified and moralised in accordance with the changing moral conceptions of mankind. It is not the gods who moralise man, it is man who ...
— Theism or Atheism - The Great Alternative • Chapman Cohen

... grace might never be drawn into example, or pleaded by his puny successors in justification of their ignorance, he decreed for the future—no poet should presume to make a lady die for love two hundred years before her birth. To moralise this story, Virgil is the Apollo who has this dispensing power. His great judgment made the laws of poetry, but he never made himself a slave to them; chronology at best is but a cobweb law, and he broke through it with his weight. They who will imitate him wisely must choose, as he did, ...
— Discourses on Satire and Epic Poetry • John Dryden

... that for punishment to be really salutary, its justice must be manifest to the culprit, or to the lookers on, at least in their cooler moments. A punishment the justice of which is not discernible, may quell for the moment, but it does not moralise, nor abidingly deter. There must be an apparent proportion between the offence and the punishment. A Draconian code, visiting petty offences with the severity due to high misdemeanours, is more of ...
— Moral Philosophy • Joseph Rickaby, S. J.

... Men moralise among ruins, or, in the throng and tumult of successful cities, recall past visions of urban desolation for prophetic warning. London is a modern Babylon; Paris has aped imperial Rome, and may share its catastrophe. But what do the sages say to Damascus? ...
— Tancred - Or, The New Crusade • Benjamin Disraeli

... counsels on her art are admirable, there is something that moves us with more than admiration in the good sense, the right feeling, the worthiness of his counsels on conduct. And Diderot did not merely moralise at large. All that he says is real, pointed, and apt for circumstance and person. The petulant damsel to whom they were addressed would not be likely to yawn over the sharp remonstrances, the vigorous plain speaking, the ...
— Diderot and the Encyclopaedists (Vol 1 of 2) • John Morley

... certain from my observation of you, Chiv, that there were spots on the sun! I wish I may die, if this isn't the queerest state of existence that we find ourselves forced into without knowing why or wherefore, Mr Pecksniff! Well, never mind! Moralise as we will, the world goes on. As Hamlet says, Hercules may lay about him with his club in every possible direction, but he can't prevent the cats from making a most intolerable row on the roofs of the houses, or the dogs from being shot in the hot weather if they ...
— Life And Adventures Of Martin Chuzzlewit • Charles Dickens

... Garuda-column, that is, a pillar engraved with the figure of Garuda, the sacred bird of Vishnu; and he added a verse about "three immortal steps" (trini amutapadani), as leading to heaven, which sounds suspiciously like an attempt to moralise the old mythical feature of the three Steps of Vishnu. Plainly Vasudeva had now risen in this part of the country from being the teacher of a church of Vishnu-Narayana to the rank of its chief god, with which he ...
— Hindu Gods And Heroes - Studies in the History of the Religion of India • Lionel D. Barnett

... acquaintances, seen under such a puzzling cross-light of good in evil, and evil in good, of sins and sinnings against, of little to be praised virtues, and much to be excused vices, that we cannot presume to moralise upon them—not even to judge them,—content to exclaim sorrowfully with the old prophet, "Alas! my brother!" Every actor on the crowded stage of "Vanity Fair" represents some type of that perverse mixture of humanity ...
— Famous Reviews • Editor: R. Brimley Johnson

... the gallant sportsmen in CYMBELINE have to encounter the abrupt declivities of hill and valley: Touchstone and Audrey jog along a level path. The deer in CYMBELINE are only regarded as objects of prey, "The game's a-foot," etc.—with Jaques they are fine subjects to moralise upon at leisure, "under the ...
— Hazlitt on English Literature - An Introduction to the Appreciation of Literature • Jacob Zeitlin

... the Russian ballet. It is the English Folk Dance Society, and their performances at the Royal Horticultural Hall at Westminster the other day showed that the Russian ballet is not to have things all its own way. I am not going to moralise upon the salacious quality of some of the themes of our exotic visitors, but certainly it would be difficult to find a stronger contrast to their ruling passion than is presented by the purity and ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, July 1, 1914 • Various

... Alyce, the wiff of a naughty fellow whose name is Matthew Manne.' There is immortality for Matthew Manne, and there is, in short-hand, the tragedy of "Alyce his wiff." The reader of this record knows more of Matthew than in two hundred years any one is likely to know of us who moralise over Matthew! At Kyloe, in Northumberland, the intellectual defects of Henry Watson have, like the naughtiness of Manne, secured him a measure of fame. (1696.) "Henry was so great a fooll, that he never could put on his own close, nor ...
— Books and Bookmen • Andrew Lang

... into her nature which rendered after events not so marvellous to me as they might seem to others. She thought a moment quite indolently, and then continued: "You make one moralise like George Eliot. Marriage is a condition, but love must be an action. The one is a contract, the other is complete possession, a principle—that is, if it exists at all. I ...
— The Judgment House • Gilbert Parker

... club, when he had imbibed very freely, he ordered an additional glass of grog, and began to moralise aloud, addressing it after ...
— The Reminiscences of an Irish Land Agent • S.M. Hussey

... Some have thought that Wordsworth had S.T.C. in his mind, in writing this stanza. I cannot agree with this. The value and interest of the poem would be lessened by our imagining that Wordsworth's heart never failed him; and that, when he appears to moralise at his own expense, he was doing so at Coleridge's. Besides, the date of this poem, taken in connection with entries in the Grasmere Journal of Dorothy Wordsworth, makes it all but certain that ...
— The Poetical Works of William Wordsworth, Vol. II. • William Wordsworth



Words linked to "Moralise" :   interpret, reclaim, rede, reform, regenerate, moralisation



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