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Newtonian   Listen
adjective
Newtonian  adj.  Of or pertaining to Sir Isaac Newton, or his discoveries.
Newtonian philosophy, the philosophy of Sir Isaac Newton; applied to the doctrine of the universe as expounded in Newton's "Principia," to the modern or experimental philosophy (as opposed to the theories of Descartes and others), and, most frequently, to the mathematical theory of universal gravitation.
Newtonian telescope (Astron.), a reflecting telescope, in which rays from the large speculum are received by a plane mirror placed diagonally in the axis, and near the open end of the tube, and thrown at right angles toward one side of the tube, where the image is formed and viewed through the eyeplace.
Newtonian theory of light. See Note under Light.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Newtonian" Quotes from Famous Books



... atomicity for the aether, we are then able to apply the Newtonian Law of Gravitation to it, which distinctly affirms that "every particle of matter attracts every other particle," and so we arrive at Thomas Young's fourth hypothesis given in the Philosophical Transactions of 1802, where he asserts ...
— Aether and Gravitation • William George Hooper

... something that by an improvement of our organs might become visible or tangible, I must acknowledge, that I find no very decisive arguments on either side; though I am inclined to the contrary opinion, as being more suitable to vulgar and popular notions. If THE NEWTONIAN philosophy be rightly understood, it will be found to mean no more. A vacuum is asserted: That is, bodies are said to be placed after such a manner, is to receive bodies betwixt them, without impulsion ...
— A Treatise of Human Nature • David Hume

... particular, the quiet, gentle, unobtrusive, and yet distinct picture of womanly loveliness that was rarely absent from my mind, had for the past twelvemonth haunted me with a constancy of argument that might have unsettled the Newtonian scheme of philosophy itself. I already more than questioned whether the benefit to be derived from the support of one so affectionate and true would not fully counterbalance the disadvantage of a concentration of interest, so far as ...
— The Monikins • J. Fenimore Cooper

... telescopes, both on the Newtonian plan; one of ten, the other of twenty, feet in length. Each has its separate building, and in the smaller building is a ...
— Maria Mitchell: Life, Letters, and Journals • Maria Mitchell

... examination, walking all round, ventured upon the further experiment of endeavouring to ascertain with her paw whether there was really anything to be apprehended from it. Still not finding any motion, our philosopher of the Newtonian school, satisfied that she had nothing to fear, seated herself quietly by the fire; and the next time she saw it in motion, she sprang gaily forward, and enjoyed her triumph, by playing with the ...
— A Hundred Anecdotes of Animals • Percy J. Billinghurst

... in a Newtonian, but at the beginning of a perhaps still greater Thomsonian era. Greater, not because any one man is probably greater than Newton,[2] but because of the stupendousness of the problems now waiting to be solved. There are a dozen men of great magnitude, either now living or but recently deceased, ...
— Scientific American Supplement, No. 717, September 28, 1889 • Various

... Asia, while the English Bards, and Scotch Reviewers were redde in America. If I could have had a speech against the Slave Trade in Africa, and an epitaph on a dog in Europe (i.e. in the Morning Post), my vertex sublimis [3] would certainly have displaced stars enough to overthrow the Newtonian system. ...
— The Works of Lord Byron: Letters and Journals, Volume 2. • Lord Byron

... treatise de imperio solis ac lunae in corpora humana, & morbis inde oriundis. At this time the Newtonian system of philosophy, from whence our author had chiefly deduced his reasonings upon this abstruse subject, were neither thoroughly understood, nor universally received: nevertheless whatever cavils were raised ...
— Medica Sacra - or a Commentary on on the Most Remarkable Diseases Mentioned - in the Holy Scriptures • Richard Mead

... gravity, elasticity and other such existed only by the perpetual leave and agency of the Deity, it may be argued he is in all places where matter is. Space, empty space will still exist without him. In this mode of proof Dr. Priestley must, contrary to the Newtonian system argue for a Plenum, before he proves the ubiquity. He cannot exclude space from his mind, nor can he exclude gravity from matter. Yet can he admit matter as well as space to be eternal, because he will not allow ...
— Answer to Dr. Priestley's Letters to a Philosophical Unbeliever • Matthew Turner



Words linked to "Newtonian" :   follower, Newtonian telescope, Newtonian reflector, newton, Newtonian mechanics



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