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noun
Order  n.  
1.
Regular arrangement; any methodical or established succession or harmonious relation; method; system; as:
(a)
Of material things, like the books in a library.
(b)
Of intellectual notions or ideas, like the topics of a discource.
(c)
Of periods of time or occurrences, and the like. "The side chambers were... thirty in order." "Bright-harnessed angels sit in order serviceable." "Good order is the foundation of all good things."
2.
Right arrangement; a normal, correct, or fit condition; as, the house is in order; the machinery is out of order.
3.
The customary mode of procedure; established system, as in the conduct of debates or the transaction of business; usage; custom; fashion. "And, pregnant with his grander thought, Brought the old order into doubt."
4.
Conformity with law or decorum; freedom from disturbance; general tranquillity; public quiet; as, to preserve order in a community or an assembly.
5.
That which prescribes a method of procedure; a rule or regulation made by competent authority; as, the rules and orders of the senate. "The church hath authority to establish that for an order at one time which at another time it may abolish."
6.
A command; a mandate; a precept; a direction. "Upon this new fright, an order was made by both houses for disarming all the papists in England."
7.
Hence: A commission to purchase, sell, or supply goods; a direction, in writing, to pay money, to furnish supplies, to admit to a building, a place of entertainment, or the like; as, orders for blankets are large. "In those days were pit orders beshrew the uncomfortable manager who abolished them."
8.
A number of things or persons arranged in a fixed or suitable place, or relative position; a rank; a row; a grade; especially, a rank or class in society; a group or division of men in the same social or other position; also, a distinct character, kind, or sort; as, the higher or lower orders of society; talent of a high order. "They are in equal order to their several ends." "Various orders various ensigns bear." "Which, to his order of mind, must have seemed little short of crime."
9.
A body of persons having some common honorary distinction or rule of obligation; esp., a body of religious persons or aggregate of convents living under a common rule; as, the Order of the Bath; the Franciscan order. "Find a barefoot brother out, One of our order, to associate me." "The venerable order of the Knights Templars."
10.
An ecclesiastical grade or rank, as of deacon, priest, or bishop; the office of the Christian ministry; often used in the plural; as, to take orders, or to take holy orders, that is, to enter some grade of the ministry.
11.
(Arch.) The disposition of a column and its component parts, and of the entablature resting upon it, in classical architecture; hence (as the column and entablature are the characteristic features of classical architecture) a style or manner of architectural designing. Note: The Greeks used three different orders, easy to distinguish, Doric, Ionic, and Corinthian. The Romans added the Tuscan, and changed the Doric so that it is hardly recognizable, and also used a modified Corinthian called Composite. The Renaissance writers on architecture recognized five orders as orthodox or classical, Doric (the Roman sort), Ionic, Tuscan, Corinthian, and Composite.
12.
(Nat. Hist.) An assemblage of genera having certain important characters in common; as, the Carnivora and Insectivora are orders of Mammalia. Note: The Linnaean artificial orders of plants rested mainly on identity in the numer of pistils, or agreement in some one character. Natural orders are groups of genera agreeing in the fundamental plan of their flowers and fruit. A natural order is usually (in botany) equivalent to a family, and may include several tribes.
13.
(Rhet.) The placing of words and members in a sentence in such a manner as to contribute to force and beauty or clearness of expression.
14.
(Math.) Rank; degree; thus, the order of a curve or surface is the same as the degree of its equation.
Artificial order or Artificial system. See Artificial classification, under Artificial, and Note to def. 12 above.
Close order (Mil.), the arrangement of the ranks with a distance of about half a pace between them; with a distance of about three yards the ranks are in open order.
The four Orders, The Orders four, the four orders of mendicant friars. See Friar.
General orders (Mil.), orders issued which concern the whole command, or the troops generally, in distinction from special orders.
Holy orders.
(a)
(Eccl.) The different grades of the Christian ministry; ordination to the ministry. See def. 10 above.
(b)
(R. C. Ch.) A sacrament for the purpose of conferring a special grace on those ordained.
In order to, for the purpose of; to the end; as means to. "The best knowledge is that which is of greatest use in order to our eternal happiness."
Minor orders (R. C. Ch.), orders beneath the diaconate in sacramental dignity, as acolyte, exorcist, reader, doorkeeper.
Money order. See under Money.
Natural order. (Bot.) See def. 12, Note.
Order book.
(a)
A merchant's book in which orders are entered.
(b)
(Mil.) A book kept at headquarters, in which all orders are recorded for the information of officers and men.
(c)
A book in the House of Commons in which proposed orders must be entered. (Eng.)
Order in Council, a royal order issued with and by the advice of the Privy Council. (Great Britain)
Order of battle (Mil.), the particular disposition given to the troops of an army on the field of battle.
Order of the day, in legislative bodies, the special business appointed for a specified day.
Order of a differential equation (Math.), the greatest index of differentiation in the equation.
Sailing orders (Naut.), the final instructions given to the commander of a ship of war before a cruise.
Sealed orders, orders sealed, and not to be opened until a certain time, or arrival at a certain place, as after a ship is at sea.
Standing order.
(a)
A continuing regulation for the conduct of parliamentary business.
(b)
(Mil.) An order not subject to change by an officer temporarily in command.
To give order, to give command or directions.
To take order for, to take charge of; to make arrangements concerning. "Whiles I take order for mine own affairs."
Synonyms: Arrangement; management. See Direction.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Order" Quotes from Famous Books



... glorious day for a drive, he need not stay long at Wilkinson's, and the team needed exercise. Moreover, Sadie was not about and would not come home until afternoon; he might get back before her. He hesitated for a few minutes and then sent an order to the stable. ...
— The Girl From Keller's - Sadie's Conquest • Harold Bindloss

... quitting the river, he distinguished our squadron, chased by twenty-six large ships of war and a number of other vessels, all of which he soon lost sight of, so much was our squadron in advance. He continued on his course in order to join them; but he could not do so until all had passed by the mouth of the river. Then steering clear of the rear-guard of the English ships, he remarked that the English fleet was hotly chasing the ship of the King of England, which ran along the coast, however, amid the fire of cannon and ...
— The Memoirs of Louis XIV., His Court and The Regency, Complete • Duc de Saint-Simon

... stooping hurts me. I have never known the happy feeling of satisfaction with my lot and my work; for I have always had a greater position than I could fill, and constantly done less than I ought to have done. In order not to look always resentful, I always wear a smile. I have nothing left of the face I was born with but the mere skin, and always wear a mask. I serve him whose master I believe I ought to be by birth; I hate Rameses, who, sincerely or no, calls me his brother; and while ...
— Uarda • Georg Ebers

... the tormentor,—a big, brawny fellow, habited in a leathern jerkin, with his arms bared to the shoulder,—taking up his hammer and selecting a couple of sharp-pointed nails; "but in any case he has an order from the Council of the Star-Chamber to stand here. And now, prisoner," he continued roughly and authoritatively,—"place your head in this hole, and ...
— The Star-Chamber, Volume 2 - An Historical Romance • W. Harrison Ainsworth

... undamaged by fire. The earthquake shock did some damage to the different entrances to the building, but the walls were left standing in good condition. President Roosevelt also sent a message to Congress asking that $300,000 be at once appropriated to finish the Mare Island Navy Yard, in order that employment might be given to the many workmen who were in extreme need of money for the ...
— The San Francisco Calamity • Various

... we came to see that in order that our prayer could be answered we would have to keep open house every day and all day, which was by no means easy. Some assured us it was wrong, because it would make us cheap in the eyes of the Chinese; others ...
— How I Know God Answers Prayer - The Personal Testimony of One Life-Time • Rosalind Goforth

... not put on himself the honor of being made a chief priest, but he that said to him, Thou art my Son, to-day have I begotten thee; [5:6]as also in another place he says, Thou art a priest for ever after the order of Melchisedec. [5:7]Who in the days of his flesh having offered both prayers and supplications to him that was able to save him from death, with loud cries and tears, [and being heard and delivered] from fear,— [5:8]although he was a Son, learned obedience from what he ...
— The New Testament • Various

... rocket from a boy's lips had transformed me from a small guest whose part was to sit silently in the shadow of the mighty clergyman, and there only to even up the side of the table, into a person of unpleasant importance. Had my father rapped for order, risen, and announced that we had the good fortune to have with us Master David Malcolm, who would tell us where James found the source of his intoxication, he could not have made me more dreadfully conspicuous. I wanted to run, but, if nothing else, my father's eyes would have ...
— David Malcolm • Nelson Lloyd

... in All's Well That Ends Well, we have one beautiful character, that of Isabella, like a light shining in corruption. Here, too, the wronged Mariana, in order to win back the faithless Angelo, is forced to resort to the same device to which Helena had to stoop. But this play is darker and more savage than its predecessor. Angelo, as a governor, sentencing men to death for the very sin which he as a private man is trying to commit, is contemptible on a ...
— An Introduction to Shakespeare • H. N. MacCracken

... had reached Mexico that Puebla had capitulated, and that the rebel leader had fled. The victory was celebrated in the capital with the most triumphal entries, harangues, bull-fights, and illuminations done to order. If you had a house in one of the principal streets, the police would make you illuminate it, whether you liked or not. The newspapers loudly proclaimed the triumph of the constitutional principle, and the inauguration of a reign of law and order ...
— Anahuac • Edward Burnett Tylor

... Augustine, Cont. Acad. II. 14, 15, seems to have imitated that part of Cicero's exposition to which this fragment belongs. If so Cic. must have condemned the unwarrantable verbal innovations of Zeno in order to excuse the extreme scepticism of Arcesilas (Krische, ...
— Academica • Marcus Tullius Cicero

... I had just granted him a favour by allowing him to leave the upper deck of the submarine, in order that he might await the motor launch in some sort of privacy; why ...
— The Diary of a U-boat Commander • Anon

... Mariano Torres, smiling at the guerilla's impatience. "It's no ordinary or easy expedition that I propose to you, nor need you undertake it unless you choose. I bring the general's authorization, not his order. The risk is great, and the object a private one; but by accomplishing it you will lay my friend Captain Herrera, and consequently myself, under ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 59, No. 367, May 1846 • Various

... Besides, there were his real parents to be thought of, if they were still alive. Max felt that perhaps he was hard—or worse still, snobbish—not to feel any instinctive affection for them. His mother had sold him, in order that she might have money to go to her husband, whom she loved so much better than her child. Well, at least she had a heart! That was something. And if the pair still kept a little hotel, what of that? Was he such a mean wretch ...
— A Soldier of the Legion • C. N. Williamson

... concealing his great reluctance on going down with him into Sussex. It was like rending his heart-strings for him to leave London for a single hour at this time. What beautiful confidences, and tender, timid looks, and sweet, small words he was leaving behind him in order to go and shoot a lot of miserable pheasants! He was rather gloomy when he met the major at Victoria Station. They got into the train; and away through the darkness of the November afternoon they rattled to Three Bridges; ...
— Macleod of Dare • William Black

... love hath no man than this, that he lay down his life for his friend—and for his enemies, maybe. Enemies these two rescued men were in one sense—young socialists—enemies to the present social order, with faces set against the capitalist and the aristocrat and the landlord; yet in the crisis of life dipping their hands in the same dish, drinking from the same cup, moved by the same sense of elementary ...
— The Judgment House • Gilbert Parker

... used; those organs, again, that are the most completely separate from the body, as the locomotive engine, must still from time to time kiss the soil of the human body, and be handled and thus crossed with man again if they would remain in working order. They cannot be cut adrift from the most living form of matter (I mean most living from our point of view), and remain absolutely without connection with it for any length of time, any more than a seal can live ...
— Luck or Cunning? • Samuel Butler

... antique were both graceful and correct, owing to his frequent practice in the Duke of Richmond's gallery, and his outlines received the fervent admiration of Bartolozzi and Cipriani. He tried his hand now and then at the high historic order of art of Barry and Fuseli, but his ambition was probably limited to a less pretentious range,—'the little pleasing paradise of miniature,' as Allan Cunningham phrases it; he cared rather for the caresses of the world of fashion than the applause ...
— Art in England - Notes and Studies • Dutton Cook

... It would be useless. I have notified all the police around and a general alarm will be sent out at once. And now I order every one to bed. We've hard work in front of ...
— The Girl Aviators' Motor Butterfly • Margaret Burnham

... "And order out a special engine and coach,—what do I care what it will cost? I'll pay. Wire your Lava chief that the money is here. Send the doctor on ahead of the regular ...
— Rim o' the World • B. M. Bower

... walked aft to see the company of soldiers on deck put through half-an-hour's drill, making a point of staring hard and derisively at the young ensign, who saw the lad's looks, grew angry, from growing angry became confused, and incurred the captain's anger by giving the wrong order to the men, some of whom went right, knowing what he ought to have said, while others went wrong, and got the company ...
— Middy and Ensign • G. Manville Fenn

... at the control board. Very professionally, he went through the routine of preparing to lift by landing-grid, which routine has not changed in two hundred years. He went briskly ahead until the order to lift. Then Calhoun ...
— This World Is Taboo • Murray Leinster

... his wife had a hen which laid every day a golden egg. They supposed that it must contain a great lump of gold in its inside, and killed it in order that they might get it, when to their surprise they found that the hen differed in no respect from their other hens. The foolish pair, thus hoping to become rich all at once, deprived themselves of the gain of which they were ...
— Boys and Girls Bookshelf (Vol 2 of 17) - Folk-Lore, Fables, And Fairy Tales • Various

... psychic, or entering into it at all. I shall keep myself to the two points of view which have helped me, as an individual, to overcome, to some degree, the fear of death, considering them in reverse order from that in which I have mentioned them. Those ...
— The Conquest of Fear • Basil King

... demanded the same troops would again take up arms as promptly and cheerfully as on previous occasions, and relied on their patriotic service being immediately available whenever required. In relieving the troops from further duty, the Commander-in-Chief promulgated the following order:— ...
— Troublous Times in Canada - A History of the Fenian Raids of 1866 and 1870 • John A. Macdonald

... hearts of those who had dwelt in it, when they were in foreign lands or hiding out on the wild wide moors. It was the time when Charles II wished to compel the most part of the people of Scotland to change their religion and worship as he bade them. Some obeyed the king; but most hated the new order of things, and cleaved in their hearts to their old ways and to their old ministers, who had been put out of their churches and homes at the coming of the king. Many even set themselves to resist the ...
— The Junior Classics • Various

... a wound on my leg. It is now healed but the strength is gone, and it is very frightened of the ground. I have been in many hospitals for a long time. At this present I am living in a hospital for Indian troops in a forest-reservation called "New," which was established by a King's order in ages past. There is no order for my return to India. I do not desire it. My Regiment has now gone out of France—to Egypt, or Africa. My officer Sahibs are for the most part dead or in hospitals. During ...
— The Eyes of Asia • Rudyard Kipling

... you know, has a pull with the Steel Trust. We've had our material delivered in short order, no matter who else waited. North cantilever is completed; ditto the south, except for part of the timbering and flooring. The central span is built out a third of the way from the north 'lever. But several ...
— Out of the Primitive • Robert Ames Bennet

... which the servants went to church with such of the children as could not walk so far. Miss Hall was an admirable assistant to the school-mistress during the week; and Gladys, with Mrs Prothero's permission, undertook the Sunday duty for the mistress, in order that she might have a holiday on that day. Miss Gwynne also attended, but she was too impatient and imperious to be a good teacher, much as she wished ...
— Gladys, the Reaper • Anne Beale

... Marquis spared no efforts to prevent the rapacity of the savages and, I must say it, of certain persons associated with them, from resulting in something worse than plunder. At last, at nine o'clock in the evening, order seemed restored. The Marquis even induced the Indians to promise that, besides the escort agreed upon in the capitulation, two chiefs for each tribe should accompany the English on their way to Fort Edward."[521] He also ordered La Corne and the other Canadian officers attached to the Indians ...
— Montcalm and Wolfe • Francis Parkman

... a fine thing to bring and plant within the theatre a great number of vast trees, with all their branches in their full verdure, representing a great shady forest, disposed in excellent order, and the first day to throw into it a thousand ostriches, a thousand stags, a thousand boars, and a thousand fallow deer, to be killed and disposed of by the people: the next day to cause an hundred great lions, ...
— Anecdotes of Painters, Engravers, Sculptors and Architects, and Curiosities of Art, (Vol. 2 of 3) • Shearjashub Spooner

... feel on their horses free, Tingles the tendoned thigh with life; Their cavalry-jackets make boys of all— With golden breasts like the oriole; The chat, the jest, and laugh are rife. But word is passed from the front—a call For order; ...
— Battle-Pieces and Aspects of the War • Herman Melville

... conjunction of art and nature without feeling that man is something better than a mere beast of the field or forest. We see him turn both art and nature to his service, and we cannot contemplate the lordly dwelling and the richly decorated land around it—and the neatness and security and order of the whole scene—without associating them with the high accomplishments and refined tastes that in all probability distinguish the proprietor and his family. It is a strange mistake to suppose that nothing is natural beyond savage ignorance—that all refinement is unnatural—that there is only ...
— Flowers and Flower-Gardens • David Lester Richardson

... the movements that are naturally becoming to human flesh so remained in the sensitive appetite that the reason was nowise hindered in doing what was right. Hence Jerome says (on Matt. 26:37) that "Our Lord, in order to prove the reality of the assumed manhood, 'was sorrowful' in very deed; yet lest a passion should hold sway over His soul, it is by a propassion that He is said to have 'begun to grow sorrowful and to be sad'"; so that it is a perfect "passion" when it dominates the soul, i.e. ...
— Summa Theologica, Part III (Tertia Pars) - From the Complete American Edition • Thomas Aquinas

... rapidly, and though leads were visible occasionally from the ship, no opening of a considerable size appeared in our neighbourhood. In the early morning of April 1 we listened again for the wireless signals from Port Stanley. The crew had lashed three 20-ft. rickers to the mast-heads in order to increase the spread of our aerials, but still we failed to hear anything. The rickers had to come down subsequently, since we found that the gear could not carry the accumulating weight of rime. Soundings proved that the sea continued to shoal as ...
— South! • Sir Ernest Shackleton

... the hill the few children had become a crowd, and our proceedings were much hampered, although our friendly guard adopted very rough measures more than once to keep them in order. The people have always been turbulent and unruly, and no doubt there is still an hereditary disposition among them to resist authority, though one must acknowledge that it was only among the young that we ...
— The Shores of the Adriatic - The Austrian Side, The Kuestenlande, Istria, and Dalmatia • F. Hamilton Jackson

... well to add here a couple of portraits of Shakespeare in later life in order to establish beyond question the chief features of his character. With this purpose in mind I shall take a portrait that is a mere sketch of him, Duke Vincentio in "Measure for Measure," and a portrait that is minutely finished and perfect, though consciously ...
— The Man Shakespeare • Frank Harris

... made a speech on this occasion, informing the estates that his Majesty had given orders that the edicts of the Emperor were to be enforced to the letter; adding that he had told the King, freely, his own opinion upon the subject; in order to dissuade him from that which others were warmly urging. He described Philip as the most liberal and debonair of princes; his council in Spain as cruel and sanguinary. Time was to show whether the epithets ...
— The Rise of the Dutch Republic, 1555-1566 • John Lothrop Motley

... waiting for, at all? And he kissed her very carefully on both eyes, and he said: Indeed thou art. Then she said softly: And dost thou then imagine that delay is any easier to me than to thyself? Know, that I had difficulty, in coming even when I did. For I had first to get rid of someone else, in order to come at all. And Atirupa said: Thy old lover, of whom thou hast told me? Then she said: Thou sayest well, my old lover, who loves me, as I think, far better than thou dost, and almost as much as I love thee. But alas! for him, ...
— Bubbles of the Foam • Unknown

... petty, narrow, and crude? Then studies reveal the great, wide universe with all its fulness and complexity of meaning. Is the life of the child egoistic, self-centered, impulsive? Then in these studies is found an objective universe of truth, law, and order. Is his experience confused, vague, uncertain, at the mercy of the moment's caprice and circumstance? Then studies introduce a world arranged on the basis of eternal and general truth; a world where all is measured ...
— The Child and the Curriculum • John Dewey

... Amiens in the retreat from Mons. It was one mass of troops and transport—the neck of the bottle, for more arrived every hour, and the only outlet was the single eastern road. The town was pandemonium into which distracted German officers were trying to introduce some order. They didn't worry much about us, for the heart of Anatolia wasn't a likely hunting-ground for suspicious characters. We took our passport to the commandant, who visaed them readily, and told us he'd do his best to get us transport. ...
— Greenmantle • John Buchan

... people, like things, have a right and a wrong way up, and there's always a place to get hold of, if you want to have a good control and grasp of them. I know where the place is, and that's my power! Driver, to the Tete Noire.' At Paul Astier's order the open carriage, in which the three tall hats belonging to Freydet, Vedrine, and himself rose in funereal outline against the brightness of the afternoon landscape, drew up on the right-hand side of the bridge ...
— The Immortal - Or, One Of The "Forty." (L'immortel) - 1877 • Alphonse Daudet

... to be done was, of course, to settle with the cheiromantist; so he sat down at a small Sheraton writing-table that stood near the window, drew a cheque for 105 pounds, payable to the order of Mr. Septimus Podgers, and, enclosing it in an envelope, told his valet to take it to West Moon Street. He then telephoned to the stables for his hansom, and dressed to go out. As he was leaving the room he looked back at Sybil Merton's photograph, and swore ...
— Lord Arthur Savile's Crime and Other Stories • Oscar Wilde

... Major Powlett records that in Alwar they assembled and burnt the State ricks and carried off cattle, though they did not succeed in plundering any towns or villages there. In British territory they sacked Firozpur and other villages, and when a British force came to restore order many were hanged. Sir D. Ibbetson wrote of them in the ...
— The Tribes and Castes of the Central Provinces of India - Volume IV of IV - Kumhar-Yemkala • R.V. Russell

... degree that he had hoped and proposed. The outrages they committed were such as proved highly detrimental to the royal cause. They spared neither friend nor foe, and exercised their usual cruelties with very little attention to the threats that were held out in order to restrain and ...
— The Loyalists of America and Their Times, Vol. 2 of 2 - From 1620-1816 • Edgerton Ryerson

... place in a vacant studio adjacent to Ernesto's. When Don Julian learns about it, he is troubled by the idea that another man should be fighting for his wife, and rushes forthwith to wreak vengeance himself on the traducer. Teodora hears the news; and in order to prevent both her husband and Ernesto from endangering their lives, she rushes to Ernesto's rooms to urge him to forestall hostilities. Meanwhile her husband encounters the slanderer, and is severely wounded. He is carried to Ernesto's studio. Hearing people coming, Teodora hides ...
— The Theory of the Theatre • Clayton Hamilton

... off till the 6th of October we had not the good fortune to discover a sail of any sort, and then, having lost all hopes of making any advantage by a longer stay, we made sail to the leeward of the port in order to join our prizes; but when we arrived on the station appointed for them we did not meet with them, though we continued there four or five days. We supposed that some chase had occasioned their leaving the station, and therefore we proceeded down the coast to the high ...
— Anson's Voyage Round the World - The Text Reduced • Richard Walter

... fancy. Crocus is the place where you will be expected to buy sugar and spice. It is some four miles from Chickaree on that side, and we are about five miles from it on this;' and as he spoke he set the horses in motion. 'I sent on a rescript to Mrs. Bywank, bidding her on her peril to be in order to receive you this evening. Mrs. Bywank and I are old acquaintances,' he said, ...
— Wych Hazel • Susan and Anna Warner

... where it is necessary to carry their judgment into execution against an absent person, shall forthwith when desired by the complainant, at his expense, send an express to the proper Governors or Waywodes, and shall order them to cause the judgment to be executed without loss of time, and thus shall oblige the person condemned, to pay the sums of money specified in ...
— The Diplomatic Correspondence of the American Revolution, Vol. VIII • Various

... with four distinct entrances for the four different families, such as he wishes every honest working couple in this country, and indeed every honest couple in all parts of the world, should possess. And, in order to shew to working men, and to builders, and to persons of property who desire to do good, how they can usefully assist their fellow creatures to comfortable habitations, for the same rent that they now pay for closely-built, unhealthy ones, he has ...
— The World's Fair • Anonymous

... yes! I certainly will, for you must surely understand that!" After pausing a moment in order to think how best to make her meaning clear, Mrs. Pitt went on in her pleasant voice. "You see, pilgrimages were always made to some especial shrine! We'll take Becket's for an example. After his terrible murder, Becket was immediately canonized (that is, made a saint), ...
— John and Betty's History Visit • Margaret Williamson

... Belle-bouche, in order to divert the conversation. "Aunt and myself thought we'd come down to the quarters and see the sick. I carried mammy Lucy some nice things, and aunt went on to see about some spinning, and I came here to look over this book of songs, which I ...
— The Youth of Jefferson - A Chronicle of College Scrapes at Williamsburg, in Virginia, A.D. 1764 • Anonymous

... to avoid unnecessary expense in working and management, a public Turkish bath should be convenient and compact in plan. It should be as perfect as possible in regard to heating and ventilation, in order to insure patronage; and, for the same reason, it should be made a thing of beauty. A badly-ventilated, inconvenient, and ill-adorned bath does harm, both to the bather and the cause. It is its own enemy, and harmful also to all other baths; whereas every ably-designed ...
— The Turkish Bath - Its Design and Construction • Robert Owen Allsop

... to distract the child's mind, she felt,—but what? And then, as though to solve the difficulty for her, came an order for half a dozen of Huldah's ...
— Dick and Brownie • Mabel Quiller-Couch

... nevertheless. Listen!—I whisper the secret in your ear. To-morrow night and every night eat your supper at eight o'clock exactly; I will do the same, and so we shall be supping in each other's company, my little wife, though twenty miles divide us. If any body asks me to supper, I will refuse in order that I may sup with you. 'I am promised to a friend,' I'll say, and then I'll sit down in my rooms alone, but you will be ...
— The Manxman - A Novel - 1895 • Hall Caine

... another set of phenomena, usually regarded as distinct and of another order, but which are not so distinct as they appear, which manifest themselves when you join the pump to a piece of glass, or any non-conductor, and try to force the electricity through that. You succeed in driving some through, but the flow is no longer like that of water ...
— Scientific American Supplement No. 275 • Various

... peace-loving of mortals, unable to see any creature suffer without a pang in his own breast, and suddenly found himself called to conduct the greatest and bloodiest of our wars; who wielded the power of government when stern resolution and relentless force were the order of the day and then won and ruled the popular mind and heart by the tender sympathies of his nature; who was a cautious conservative by temperament and mental habit, and led the most sudden and sweeping social revolution of our time; who, ...
— The Papers And Writings Of Abraham Lincoln, Complete - Constitutional Edition • Abraham Lincoln

... we met Narayan Singh returning from the suk with parcels under his arm. That in itself was a sure sign of the lapse of contact with law and order; in Jerusalem he would have had an Arab carry them, because dignity is part of a Sikh's uniform. You realized without a word said that the uniform would be discarded presently. He looked me up and down as the quartermaster ...
— The Lion of Petra • Talbot Mundy

... a brighter aspiration, than that which animates and supports me now. Peace restored—law established—art, letters, intellect, dawning upon the night of time; the Patricians, no longer bandits of rapine, but the guard of order; the People ennobled from a mob, brave to protect, enlightened to guide, themselves. Then, not by the violence of arms, but by the majesty of her moral power, shall the Mother of Nations claim the obedience of her children. Thus dreaming and thus hoping, ...
— Rienzi • Edward Bulwer Lytton

... headed by Sir Robert Welles, son to the lord of that name. The army of the rebels amounted to thirty thousand men; but Lord Welles himself, far from giving countenance to them, fled into a sanctuary, in order to secure his person against the king's anger or suspicions. He was allured from this retreat by a promise of safety; and was soon after, notwithstanding this assurance, beheaded, along with Sir Thomas Dymoc, by ...
— The History of England in Three Volumes, Vol.I., Part B. - From Henry III. to Richard III. • David Hume

... and the several departments of the City Government. This concern receives not less than $3,000,000 a year out of the city treasury. As an illustration of the way they do things, we will cite one instance: During the month of April of the present year, an order was sent to this company for stationery for the County Bureau. In due time it was delivered, and consisted of about six reams of cap paper, and an equal quantity of letter paper, with a couple of reams of note paper. ...
— Lights and Shadows of New York Life - or, the Sights and Sensations of the Great City • James D. McCabe

... difficulty with comets; there must have been some very urgent necessity for human beings in order to have peopled them. When they pass ...
— Willis the Pilot • Paul Adrien

... gravely, "I have something to tell you, in order to clear myself from a possible misunderstanding. It may happen that I shall need your vindication with your father. ...
— The Golden Fleece • Julian Hawthorne

... the character of a merchant, and conveyed gradually a great many sorts of rich stuffs and fine linen to his lodging from the cavern, but with all the necessary precautions imaginable to conceal the place whence he brought them. In order to dispose of the merchandizes, when he had amassed them together, he took a warehouse, which happened to be opposite to Cassim's, which Ali Baba's son had occupied since the ...
— The Arabian Nights Entertainments Complete • Anonymous

... on, "I could not resist putting on the costume in order to get nearer the real feeling of such a scene, and it was so delicious that I at once wrapped myself up and come here in a cab. The maid told me you were not expected till late. It's very amusing, by the way—that girl really ...
— Cleo The Magnificent - The Muse of the Real • Louis Zangwill

... long time before Cecile reappeared, and when she did so order was restored to the Malet's parlor. Old Mme. Malet was seated in her own easy-chair by the fire; one trembling hand rested on Joe's neck; Joe knelt at her feet, and the eyes of this long-divided mother and son seemed literally ...
— The Children's Pilgrimage • L. T. Meade

... it is natural, when a grievance arises, we should be inclined to look to those old offenders for redress in the first instance. Sometimes the masters convince us the fault lies with workmen; and then we trouble the master no more than we are forced to do in order to act upon the offenders. But, to come to the point: what ...
— Put Yourself in His Place • Charles Reade

... had charged these little beings to be very kind and attentive to the children; to cook their meals and serve them nicely, and to keep their houses in pretty order. ...
— The Girl's Own Paper, Vol. VIII, No. 357, October 30, 1886 • Various

... side by side (The man who accepted that one copy died),— From one end of a shelf to the other they reach, "With the author's respects" neatly written in each. The publisher, sure, will proclaim a Te Deum, When he hears of that order the British Museum 470 Has sent for one set of what books were first printed In America, little or big,—for 'tis hinted That this is the first truly tangible hope he Has ever had raised for the sale of a copy. I've thought very often 'twould be a good thing In all public collections of books, if ...
— The Complete Poetical Works of James Russell Lowell • James Lowell

... daylight, and without any considerable opposition, Sedgwick could have marched the fifteen miles to Chancellorsville in the few hours allotted him. Nor is it claimed by Hooker that it was possible for Sedgwick to obey the order of ten P.M. literally; for it was issued under the supposition that Sedgwick was still on the north bank of the river. But Hooker does allege that Sedgwick took no pains to keep him informed of what he was doing; whence his incorrect assumption. To recross the river for the ...
— The Campaign of Chancellorsville • Theodore A. Dodge

... that that branch of the venture had miscarried. He would gather from our being here that we had news of my father's capture, and as he would know that the marauders would fail unless they were relieved by force, he would order the captive ...
— The Lady of the Shroud • Bram Stoker

... their head, might still tear admissions from her weariness, which a certain sympathetic atmosphere in a large auditory, swept by waves of natural feeling, would strengthen her to keep back. The Bishop made a proclamation that in order not to vex and tire his learned associates he would have the minutes of the previous sittings reduced into form, and submitted to them for judgment, while he himself carried on apart what further interrogatory was necessary. We are told that he ...
— Jeanne d'Arc - Her Life And Death • Mrs.(Margaret) Oliphant

... but for some time were unable. "What color was the animal?" enquired Mrs. ——. "Indade Ma'am, an' its jist the color uv a dog he was," answered Terry. This reply was greeted with a burst of laughter from all present, at which he was highly offended. In order to pacify him I said, "we would not laugh at you, Terry, only that dogs are of so many different colors that we are as much in the dark as ever regarding the color of the animal you saw." "Well thin," replied he, "if you must know, he ...
— The Path of Duty, and Other Stories • H. S. Caswell

... opened into the lake, the progress became much less exciting. The water was a little lumpy, and had a tendency, while they were walking back at the end of one punt in order to start another, of jumping the "Cock-House" back into precisely the same position from which ...
— The Cock-House at Fellsgarth • Talbot Baines Reed

... relation of the deceased, took their place in the funeral procession; and the invitations to the syndicate, and to the learned bodies who accompanied it, were made by that body in the same character. The whole was conducted with much appropriate order and decency, and whilst every attention and respect were paid to the memory of the deceased, nothing was attempted beyond the unostentatious simplicity which the deceased had frequently declared to be his ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction—Volume 13 - Index to Vol. 13 • Various

... terms of peace. The one real piece of military work taken in hand was the siege and capture of Sluys in Flanders (in conjunction with Albert of Saxony, on behalf of Maximilian); from which port much injury of a piratical order had been wrought upon English merchants. Meantime negotiations had been carried on, but with no appearance of success. At last in October the King actually crossed the Channel to take command of the army of invasion; and sat down before Boulogne. Then on a sudden the air cleared. Charles in fact ...
— England Under the Tudors • Arthur D. Innes

... for the whole cutting and embankment over Chat Moss is 270,000 pounds nearly, at those quantities and those prices which are decidedly correct . . . It will be necessary to take this Moss completely out at the bottom, in order to ...
— Lives of the Engineers - The Locomotive. George and Robert Stephenson • Samuel Smiles

... at present," said I, "require a knife with indispensable cheese-scoop and marmalade-shredding attachment. My indispensable steel mirror with patent lanyard and powder puff for attachment to service revolver is in perfect working order. I already possess two pairs of marching boots with indispensable trapdoors in each heel containing complete pedicure set and French-Portuguese dictionaries. My indispensable fur waistcoats, Indian clubs, ponchos, collapsible Turkish baths, steel aprons ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 153, Dec. 26, 1917 • Various

... watchmaker's wife, but was unable to efface the recollections of her youth. She was the daughter of a French marquis, who, after gambling away his whole fortune at the court of Louis XV., had emigrated with his young wife and daughter to Berlin, in order to seek another fortune at the court of Frederick the Great. But Frederick the Great had already become somewhat distrustful of the roving marquises and counts whom France sent to Berlin. Marquis de Barbasson, my worthy grandfather, received, ...
— NAPOLEON AND BLUCHER • L. Muhlbach

... therefore he perceived the thoughts of the king. And he said unto him: Is it because thou hast heard that I defended thy servants and thy flocks, and slew seven of their brethren with the sling and with the sword, and smote off the arms of others, in order to defend thy flocks and thy servants; behold, is it this that causeth ...
— The Book Of Mormon - An Account Written By The Hand Of Mormon Upon Plates Taken - From The Plates Of Nephi • Anonymous

... had unslung his Mannlicher and held it in hand since the moment of the first alarm, and now they opened the magazine and saw that all was in perfect order. Then they threw the deadly little rifles into the embrasures formed by the window slits, and all ...
— Jack Haydon's Quest • John Finnemore

... of the usual cut-and-dried order of the young theologue. His theology had been studied to help him to understand his God and his Bible, not to give him a set of rules for preaching. So when he stood up in the pulpit it was not to follow any conventional ...
— The Witness • Grace Livingston Hill Lutz

... them at home that he was giving lessons in the classics several hours daily, in order to live while he was carrying on his own studies; nor that, to keep the burden of his kind hosts, as well as his own burden, from growing any heavier, he had refused to eat with them; and was keeping himself ...
— Hills of the Shatemuc • Susan Warner

... her, albeit regretfully, and stood watching while she dexterously twisted, and smoothed, and patted her shining hair into some semblance of order; and while so doing, she berated ...
— The Amateur Gentleman • Jeffery Farnol et al

... formed their Plans in this View. As Greece was a Collection of many Governments, who suffered very much among themselves, and gave the Persian Emperor, who was their common Enemy, many Advantages over them by their mutual Jealousies and Animosities, Homer, in order to establish among them an Union, which was so necessary for their Safety, grounds his Poem upon the Discords of the several Grecian Princes who were engaged in a Confederacy against an Asiatick Prince, and the several Advantages which the Enemy gained ...
— The Spectator, Volumes 1, 2 and 3 - With Translations and Index for the Series • Joseph Addison and Richard Steele

... when it means a short prose narrative, which presents artistically a bit of real life; the primary object of which is to amuse, though it may also depict a character, plead a cause, or point a moral; this amusement is neither of that aesthetic order which we derive from poetry, nor of that cheap sort which we gain from a broad burlesque: it is the simple yet intellectual pleasure derived from listening ...
— Short Story Writing - A Practical Treatise on the Art of The Short Story • Charles Raymond Barrett

... down the little spiral stair used only by the servants, and knowing all the mysteries of lock and bar, was presently in the open air. First he sought a view of the building against the sky, but could not see that any portion was missing. He then proceeded to walk round the house, in order to ...
— Malcolm • George MacDonald

... fulfilled it very imperfectly—as all men fulfil their duties. But it was there— in their heart of hearts. It helped to make them; and, therefore, it helped to make us. It ennobled them; it called out in them the sense of unity, order, discipline, and a lofty and unselfish affection. And I thank God, as an Englishman, for any event, however exquisitely painful, which may call out those true graces in us, their descendants. And, therefore, my good friends, if any cynic shall sneer, as he may, after ...
— All Saints' Day and Other Sermons • Charles Kingsley

... men about Pemisapan, and very lustie fellowes, with twentie more appointed to them had the charge of my person to see an order taken for the same, which they ment should in this sort haue bene executed. (M296) In the dead time of the night they would haue beset my house, and put fire in the reedes that the same was couered with: meaning (as it was likely) that my selfe would haue come running ...
— The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques and Discoveries of - the English Nation. Vol. XIII. America. Part II. • Richard Hakluyt

... was an attic where ten or twelve people herded in a space not large enough for four. Some of these homes were never warm in winter. In some there was hardly any furniture. But we need not turn to these extreme cases in order to show that in many thousands of American homes virtue and innocence are lost because no facilities for preserving ...
— What eight million women want • Rheta Childe Dorr

... abundantly proved, before we come to the close. In respect to the etymologies, which I have already offered and considered, I have all along annexed the histories of the persons and places spoken of, in order to ascertain my opinion concerning them. But the chief proof, as I have before said, will result from the whole; from an uniform series of evidence, supported by a ...
— A New System; or, an Analysis of Antient Mythology. Volume I. • Jacob Bryant

... pursue. Greatly perplexed, he turned the matter over and over, until finally he reached the conclusion that this was a mode of welcome among the white men, and that the politeness of the other kept him silent, in order that the visitor should first take up the word, in which opinion he was confirmed by the sedate and unmoved expression of the face. With such a notion occupying his mind, he rose from his seat, and throwing the beaver ...
— The Knight of the Golden Melice - A Historical Romance • John Turvill Adams

... industrious and happy little village communities.[3] The proprietor of the village of Jabera, in whose mango grove our tents were pitched, conducted me to the ruins of the wall; and told me that it had been broken down by the order of the Emperor Aurangzeb.[4] History to these people is all a fairy tale; and this emperor is the great destroyer of everything that the Muhammadans in their fanaticism have demolished of the Hindoo ...
— Rambles and Recollections of an Indian Official • William Sleeman

... whose governing principles are industry and the love of order, much may be expected towards the improvement and prosperity of the country in which their settlements are formed, and experience authorizes the belief that ...
— Washington and the American Republic, Vol. 3. • Benson J. Lossing

... kindly to the Jenkins, and thank them for having asked about me. Tell Mrs. J. that I am engaged perfecting myself in the "Gallic idiom," in order to be a worthier Vatel for the future. Monsieur Follete, our host, is a Vatel by the way. He cooks himself, and is not insensible to flattery on the score of his table. I began, of course, to complain of the wine (part of the routine of life at Mentone); I told him that where one found a ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 23 (of 25) • Robert Louis Stevenson

... going to get up; that's what!" replied a firm female voice. "It's 8 o'clock, and I want to put your room in order; and I'm not going to wait all day about it, either! Get up and go down to your breakfast, and let me have the room!" And the clamor at the ...
— Pipes O'Pan at Zekesbury • James Whitcomb Riley

... Had he not read of this in books, how the young must slay the old in order that life might go on, just as the earth must die in autumn so that the seeds of spring may be planted? Had he not read Ibsen's Master Builder, where the aging hero hears the dread doom which youth brings, ...
— The Best Short Stories of 1920 - and the Yearbook of the American Short Story • Various

... Let alone the Pandavas, O slayer of Madhu, the very gods are not competent to vanquish Bhishma, Kripa, Drona and Karna, in battle. If, O Madhava, we are, in the observance of the practices of our order, cut off with weapons in battle, when our end comes, even that will lead us to heaven. Even this, O Janardana, is our highest duty as Kshatriyas, viz., that we should lay ourselves down on the field of battle on a bed of ...
— The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 2 • Kisari Mohan Ganguli

... very nice song for rain, and it goes this way. (Note: Here came a lovely little humming song whose words could not be interpreted, since they were but syllables and sounds having no meaning in English. However, these sounds had a definite order and rhythm. At this point the husband smilingly joined in the song, and the unison of both sounds and rhythm ...
— The Unwritten Literature of the Hopi • Hattie Greene Lockett

... her grief, and inclination to scold. She summarily sent off Mungo and Tartar by the conveyance that brought her, and would have sent Rollo away, but that Herbert protested against it, and no power short of an order from him would have taken the ...
— The Three Brides • Charlotte M. Yonge

... healthiness is in proportion to blackness; whilst another says, that if the South Down sheep were suffered to run in a wild state, they would in a very few years become absolutely black. All these are the opinions of eminent breeders: in order to reconcile them, others breed for speckled faces; and it is the ...
— Highways & Byways in Sussex • E.V. Lucas

... looking like a miniature man with a crimson turban and sable spear, attacking the bark of yon old oak. He is making a sounding-board of the seamed mail of the venerable monarch, to detect by the startled writhing within the grub snugly ensconced, as it thinks, there, in order to transfix it with his sharp tongue through the hole made by his bill. He ceases his work though as we approach—and now ...
— Graham's Magazine Vol XXXIII No. 3 September 1848 • Various

... search after the character and exploits of this godly man among his ignorant and miserable brethren, to bring them to a knowledge of the truth as it is in our Master. Consider upon the tyrants and false christians against whom he had to contend in order to get access to his brethren. See him and his ministers in the states of New York, New Jersey, Penn. Delaware and Maryland, carrying the gladsome tidings of free and full salvation to the colored people. Tyrants and false christians however, would ...
— Walker's Appeal, with a Brief Sketch of His Life - And Also Garnet's Address to the Slaves of the United States of America • David Walker and Henry Highland Garnet

... very gravely in assent. 'They go from place to place,' he said, 'if haply they might find one in which it is possible to live. Whether it is order or whether it is license, it is according to their own will. They try all things, ever looking for something which the soul may endure. And new cities are founded from time to time, and a new endeavor ever and ...
— The Little Pilgrim: Further Experiences. - Stories of the Seen and the Unseen. • Margaret O. (Wilson) Oliphant

... door after seeing the governor and his two companions disappear up the hill, and smiled at Fledra with shining eyes. The wonderful events of the evening had taken place in such rapid order that she had no time to express her happiness to the girl. She opened her arms, and Fledra darted ...
— From the Valley of the Missing • Grace Miller White

... a depth of ten feet, is almost indispensable before a safe Judgment can be pronounced upon the full dry-farm possibilities of a district. Especially is it necessary to know (a) the depth, (b) the uniformity of structure, and (c) the relative fertility of the soil, in order to plan an intelligent system of farming that will be rationally adapted to the rainfall and ...
— Dry-Farming • John A. Widtsoe

... intention of the legislature to effect their reformation. How then is this great philanthropic end to be best attained? Is it by holding out no inducements to good conduct, no distinction between repentant vice and incorrigible enormity? Those who have been convicted of the higher order of offences, and have been in consequence transported for life, are from the very nature of their sentences precluded from ever enjoying the privilege in question, unless, indeed, their very exemplary conduct ...
— Statistical, Historical and Political Description of the Colony of New South Wales and its Dependent Settlements in Van Diemen's Land • William Charles Wentworth

... interrogated as to her intentions, declared her purpose of wearing a certain black silk dress which had seen every party at Mrs Stumfold's during Margaret's Littlebath season. To this her cousin demurred, and from demurring proceeded to the enunciation of a positive order. The black silk dress in question should not be worn. Now Miss Mackenzie chose to be still in mourning on the second of June, the day of the bazaar, her brother having died in September, and had no fitting garment, so she said, other ...
— Miss Mackenzie • Anthony Trollope

... I believe it to be possible for men to be mutinous and seditious who feel no grievance, but I believe no man will assert seriously, that, when people are of a turbulent spirit, the best way to keep them in order is to furnish them with something substantial to ...
— The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. IV. (of 12) • Edmund Burke

... stay still. You must either climb or slip down—unless, indeed, you have got your leg over the topmost rung, which means the stability of an hereditary title and landed property. We all ought to have hereditary titles and landed property, in order to insure national prosperity for ever. Novelists do not, as a rule, treat of the Sinking Back because it is a depressing subject. There are many ways of falling. Mostly, the father makes an ass of himself in the way of business or speculation; or he dies too soon; or his sons possess ...
— As We Are and As We May Be • Sir Walter Besant

... In order to see how the several parts of the eye contribute to produce this effect, let us follow the rays proceeding from a luminous point, and see what will happen to them from the beforementioned ...
— Popular Lectures on Zoonomia - Or The Laws of Animal Life, in Health and Disease • Thomas Garnett

... any people on Luscious either." He chewed his lip thoughtfully for a moment. "About an hour after we picked you and Lyad up," he said, "we had a Council Order transmitted to the ship. Told us to swing off course a bit and rendezvous with a fast courier ...
— Legacy • James H Schmitz

... with a shock, but he was too keen-witted to give way to alarm and leave his task unfinished. He must remove the whole pile, in order to give no cause for suspicion that he had been excavating in search of something; and the sooner it was done the better. It was noon when the work was finished and he entered the house, where there was ...
— Prescott of Saskatchewan • Harold Bindloss

... to find his way back to his ship by the first man-of-war calling at the port. Jack wished very much that he could remain on board the Venus, to keep up, as he said, his friends' spirits, but as he had two or three hundred slaves on board his prize, he had to return to her to preserve order. ...
— The Three Midshipmen • W.H.G. Kingston

... to order of the grocer and butcher, made beds, swept rooms, and sat down with a new magazine, dropped at the door by the postman, to run her eyes over the pictures. One or two things she was sure her father would like; a sketch of Massenet she must call to Rose Bartlett's attention. She ...
— Otherwise Phyllis • Meredith Nicholson

... "Order Wickham to dismount his brigade, and attack on the right!" he added to Lieutenant Garnett, aid-de-camp. Twenty minutes afterward, Wickham's men were seen advancing, and driving the enemy before them. This relieved the left, and Wickham continued to push on until ...
— Mohun, or, The Last Days of Lee • John Esten Cooke

... off his hat. Now, the spirit of Lamb's gallantry would have prompted some such expression of homage, though the customs of the country would not allow it to be literally fulfilled, for the very reason that would prompt it—viz., in order to pay respect—since the girl would, in such a case, suppose a man laughing at her. But the instinct of his heart was to think highly of female nature, and to pay a real homage (not the hollow demonstration of outward honour which a Frenchman calls his "homage," and which is really a mask ...
— The Works of Charles and Mary Lamb, Volume 2 • Charles Lamb

... then puffed up with wind and pride, struts about, retaining his magnificent size as long as he can. Pouters often take flight with their crops inflated; and after one of my birds had swallowed a good meal of peas and water, as he flew up in order to disgorge them and thus feed his nearly fledged young, I have heard the peas rattling in his inflated crop as if in a bladder. When flying, they often strike the backs of their wings together, and ...
— The Variation of Animals and Plants Under Domestication, Vol. I. • Charles Darwin



Words linked to "Order" :   order Torpediniformes, athenaeum, investors club, regularise, enjoin, order Opiliones, kilter, order Anaspida, order Ostariophysi, class, order Actinomyxidia, Corinthian order, order Cypriniformes, order Apodiformes, cloture, order Acarina, order Equisetales, postal order, order Gnetales, order Trichoptera, order Tinamiformes, order Primates, order Araneida, order Marattiales, society, order Dinornithiformes, order Siphonophora, order Nidulariales, order Mysidacea, order Sphaerocarpales, short-order, order Nudibranchia, organize, order Palmales, tranquillity, holy order, market order, order Embiodea, Carthusian order, concordance, peace, order Trogoniformes, order Actinomycetales, chapter, magnitude, ostiary, order Selaginellales, order Caprimulgiformes, regulate, decide, order Juglandales, order Tuberales, order Sphagnales, glee club, genetic code, order Eubryales, tranquility, artistic style, organise, order Xiphosura, contemporise, order Actinaria, banning-order, order Secotiales, order Rhoeadales, order Chytridiales, ordain, previous question, order Pterosauria, order Aristolochiales, order Opuntiales, order Mycrosporidia, cease and desist order, polity, order Discocephali, large order, order Peronosporales, systematize, asking, order Chelonethida, order Gadiformes, put, country club, gag law, standing order, order Pezizales, deregulate, made-to-order, order Struthioniformes, order Myxobacterales, order Eurypterida, closure, say, order Erysiphales, order Lichenales, sect, order Notostraca, order Ostracodermi, order Geophilomorpha, order Uredinales, order Caudata, order Alismales, order Caryophyllales, order of the day, order Pelecaniformes, extended order, Society of Jesus, order of magnitude, order Phallales, order Lagomorpha, make up one's mind, order Loricata, impose, order Myaceae, systemise, parliamentary procedure, square away, order Haplosporidia, orderly, order Belemnoidea, request, spit and polish, order Entomophthorales, order Alcyonaria, order-Chenopodiales, neaten, order Tubulidentata, tidy, religious order, order Auriculariales, deacon, order of Saint Benedict, military, order Spirochaetales, order Plectognathi, order Ranales, contemporize, order Piciformes, golf club, bidding, order Batoidei, order of payment, order Ulvales, order Bennettitales, order Dinoflagellata, regularize, order Procellariiformes, order Endomycetales, disorderliness, military machine, order Filicales, zone, order Helotiales, order Andreaeales, judge, concord, order Perissodactyla, order Pseudoscorpionida, imperial decree, order Coniferales, word order, layout, order Pholidota, order Ichthyosauria, order Plantaginales, position, service club, order Colymbiformes, seed, order Temnospondyli, architecture, stability, Order Osteoglossiformes, order Proboscidea, order Orthoptera, order Marchantiales, taxon, side order, order Bryales, prescribe, harmony, order Jungermanniales, telephone order, order Sarcosporidia, order Proteales, anagnost, order Diapensiales, bespeak, order Saprolegniales, slate club, order Zeomorphi, order Ranunculales, order Hypocreales, yacht club, order Thecodontia, order Papaverales, club member, order Pseudoscorpiones, order Isoptera, command, rate, order Apterygiformes, mover, order Moniliales, order Orchidales, order Umbellales, credit order, grade, order Chelonia, order Urticales, order Rosales, order Sphaeriales, tidiness, order Crocodylia, tell, order Conodontophorida, order Eurotiales, Carmelite order, to order, order Aplacophora, legal separation, order Decapoda, jockey club, jurisprudence, clean up, order Cordaitales, order Protura, call, order Insessores, order Accipitriformes, order Podicipediformes, reorder, order Solenichthyes, order Testudines, phrase, order Mycelia Sterilia, Dominican order, order Myrtales, first-order correlation, tall order, order Guttiferales, order Anostraca, order Picariae, taxonomic group, programma, order Casuarinales, rules of order, rank order, plural form, priest, order Galliformes, send for, order Artiodactyla, order Myxobacteriales, stay, order Ephemeroptera, scaling, biological science, range, order form, order Thysanoptera, bill-me order, order Branchiura, order Podicipitiformes, order Cydippida, doorkeeper, bacteria order, Franciscan order, short order, order Lycoperdales, synchronise, order arms, call to order, order Isoetales, hunt club, atheneum



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