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Quakerism   Listen
noun
Quakerism  n.  The peculiar character, manners, tenets, etc., of the Quakers.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Quakerism" Quotes from Famous Books



... something which had heretofore been regarded as exceptional and extraordinary. In the Seventeenth Century there was a general revolt of the oppressed against oppression, declaring itself in all phases of the outer and inner life; of these, there must needs be one interior to all the rest, and Quakerism seems to have been it. It was a revolution within revolutions; it saw in the man's own self the only tyrant who could really enslave him; and by bringing him into the direct presence of God, it showed him the way to the only real emancipation. Historically, it was the vital element in all other ...
— The History of the United States from 1492 to 1910, Volume 1 • Julian Hawthorne

... hastened to interpose. 'Whisht, gudewife; is this a time, or is this a day, to be singing your ranting fule sangs in?—a time when the wine of wrath is poured out without mixture in the cup of indignation, and a day when the land should give testimony against popery, and prelacy, and quakerism, and independency, and supremacy, and erastianism, and antinomianism, and a' the ...
— Waverley • Sir Walter Scott

... servants came in, prayers were said, and the ladies (Mrs. Kingsley and their daughter's governess) bid us good-night. Then to Mr. Kingsley's study, where the rest of the evening was spent—from half-past ten to half-past twelve—the pipe went on, and the talk—a continuous flow. Quakerism was a subject. George Fox, Kingsley said, was his admiration: he read his Journal constantly—thought him one of the most remarkable men that age produced. He liked his hostility to Calvinism. "How little that fellow ...
— Lippincott's Magazine, Vol. XVII, No. 99, March, 1876 • Various

... visited, in 1699, his province with his wife and family, and returned to England in 1701. The suspicion with which he had been regarded under William's government, ceased at the accession of Queen Anne, and the unyielding advocate of Quakerism was permitted to live with greater freedom, and to fear persecution less. In 1710, he removed to Rushcomb, near Twyford, Berks, where he spent the rest of his life. Three repeated attacks of an apoplexy at last ...
— The Book of Religions • John Hayward

... idea which Paine first allied with American Independence. Those who suppose that Paine did but reproduce the principles of Rousseau and Locke will find by careful study of his well-weighed language that such is not the case. Paine's political principles were evolved out of his early Quakerism. He was potential in George Fox. The belief that every human soul was the child of God, and capable of direct inspiration from the Father of all, without mediator or priestly intervention, or sacramental instrumentality, was fatal to all privilege ...
— The Writings Of Thomas Paine, Complete - With Index to Volumes I - IV • Thomas Paine

... Quakerism hung around him; his coat was buff, his hat straight in the brim, his manner prim, and when he spoke it was in the speech of his people. His complexion was very light, hair, eyebrows and lashes, and the down on his chin—almost flaxen; his face was browned by exposure to the weather, ...
— The Mormon Prophet • Lily Dougall

... peculiarity is especially noticeable. A stiffness, not to say an appearance of affectation is often given to the conversation by the use of thou and thee. This was probably a survival in Cooper of the Quakerism of his ancestors; for he sometimes used it in his private letters. But since the action of his stories was in nearly all cases laid in a period in which the second person singular had become obsolete in ordinary speech, an unnatural ...
— James Fenimore Cooper - American Men of Letters • Thomas R. Lounsbury



Words linked to "Quakerism" :   theological doctrine



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