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Soak   Listen
verb
Soak  v. i.  
1.
To lie steeping in water or other liquid; to become sturated; as, let the cloth lie and soak.
2.
To enter (into something) by pores or interstices; as, water soaks into the earth or other porous matter.
3.
To drink intemperately or gluttonously. (Slang)






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Soak" Quotes from Famous Books



... That was because God first had to make the oyster. You can't make an oyster out of nothing, nor you can't do it in a day. You've got to start with a vast variety of invertebrates, belemnites, trilobites, jebusites, amalekites, and that sort of fry, and put them into soak in a primary sea and observe and wait what will happen. Some of them will turn out a disappointment; the belemnites and the amalekites and such will be failures, and they will die out and become extinct in the course of the nineteen million years ...
— Mark Twain, A Biography, 1835-1910, Complete - The Personal And Literary Life Of Samuel Langhorne Clemens • Albert Bigelow Paine

... extracted in Koch's or Procter's extractor with 500 c.c. of water at a temperature not exceeding 50 C.; the extraction is then continued with boiling water till the filtrate amounts to 1 litre. It is desirable to allow the material to soak for some hours before commencing the percolation, which should occupy not less than three hours, so as to extract the maximum of tannin. Any remaining solubles in the material must be neglected or reported ...
— Synthetic Tannins • Georg Grasser

... drawing it out, the plume should come off, it is a proof that it is boiled enough, if not, let it boil a little longer; when it is settled filter it off, and in the liquor thus strained put in shavings of horn; let them soak for three days, and, first anointing your hands with oil, work the horn into a mass, and print or mould it ...
— Young's Demonstrative Translation of Scientific Secrets • Daniel Young

... bold-eyed Roman women think it rather odd that we should like to powder our shaggy heads with brick-dust. However, these are matters of taste. We, for our part, cannot repress a feeling of disgust at the loungers in the street, who, XXVI. tells us, are all going to soak themselves half the day in the baths yonder; for, if there is in Pompeii one thing more offensive than another to our savage sense of propriety, it is the personal cleanliness of the inhabitants. We little know what a change for the better will ...
— Italian Journeys • William Dean Howells

... he could hardly keep from looking at her smilingly in a way that would have puzzled and annoyed her. And outside the hall, when they found that the mist, like a sour man who will not give way to his temper but keeps on dropping disagreeable remarks, was letting down just enough of itself to soak Edinburgh without giving it the slightest hope that it would rain itself out by the morning, he caught again this queer flavour of her that in its sharpness and its freshness reminded him of the taste of fresh celery. He asked her if she hadn't an umbrella, and she replied, "I've ...
— The Judge • Rebecca West

... purpose— We must behold no object save our country— And only look on death as beautiful, So that the sacrifice ascend to heaven And draw down freedom on her evermore. Calendaro. But if we fail—— I. Bertuccio. They never fail who die In a great cause: the block may soak their gore; Their heads may sodden in the sun; their limbs Be strung to city gates and castle walls— But still their spirit walks abroad. Though years Elapse, and others share as dark a doom, They but augment the deep and sweeping thoughts Which overpower all others, and conduct The world at last ...
— Critical Miscellanies, Vol. I - Essay 3: Byron • John Morley

... resumed their interrupted flight, this time over the mountains, and in full sunlight. Maskull settled down again to his thoughts. The peculiar atmosphere of the country continued to soak into his brain. His will became so restless and uneasy that merely to sit there in inactivity was a torture. He could scarcely endure not to ...
— A Voyage to Arcturus • David Lindsay

... with a rich cigar and ride around in a motor car; I go to a swell cafe to dine and soak my works in the rarest wine. Oh, nothing's too rich for your Uncle Jones, whose check is good ...
— Rippling Rhymes • Walt Mason

... be washed and placed in a basin of cold water the night before they are required for use, and should remain in soak about ten or twelve hours. If left longer than this during hot weather they ...
— New Vegetarian Dishes • Mrs. Bowdich

... mother's never lets go! It slips into a five and three-quarters glove, but you 'll be surprised, Mr. Edgar, when you discover you cannot get away from it. Very well, then; it is settled. I 'll go back and put the salt fish in soak for my boarder's breakfast. I seem to have my hands rather full!—a house to keep, an invalid mother, and now a boarder. The very thing I vowed that I never would have—another boarder; what grandmamma would have called ...
— Polly Oliver's Problem • Kate Douglas Smith Wiggin

... floor with white sheets. Have two or three small evergreen trees at rear, covered with white calcimine and diamond powder. Soak long rags, shaped like icicles, in a strong solution of alum, and then let them crystallize, then attach ...
— The White Christmas and other Merry Christmas Plays • Walter Ben Hare

... neither making any noise nor any fire, even for the sake of cooking, so as not to be noticed in case their enemies should by accident pass by. They make no fire, except in smoking, which amounts to almost nothing. They eat baked Indian meal, which they soak in water, when it becomes a kind of porridge. They provide themselves with such meal to meet their wants, when they are near their enemies, or when retreating after a charge, in which case they are not ...
— Voyages of Samuel de Champlain, Vol. 2 • Samuel de Champlain

... Whitehall, and whose short reign was always one of rare pleasure and splendor. He and other rulers of pastimes were dethroned and banished from the kingdom. Yule cakes, which the feasters used to cut in slices, toast, and soak in spicy ale, were not to be eaten—or certainly not on Christmas. It was not even allowable for the pretty Yule candles ...
— Yule-Tide in Many Lands • Mary P. Pringle and Clara A. Urann

... sole of his boot. "A'll no take m' fist t' y' as A wud t' a Man! A'll treat y' as A wud a dirty broth of a brat of a boy with the flat o' my hand an' sole leather; y' scum, y' runt, y' hoggish swinish whiskey soak o' bacon an' fat! 'Tis th' likes o' you are the curse o' this country, y' horse-thief sheriff, y' bribe-takin' blackguard guardian o' justice an' right! y' coward not doin' th' crime y' self, ...
— The Freebooters of the Wilderness • Agnes C. Laut

... Old soak came up and asked for booze and had the same old grin While others burned their living forms and wet their coats with gin. Outside the doorway women stood, their faces seamed with woe And wept just like they used to ...
— Songs of the Cattle Trail and Cow Camp • Various

... wearisome labor of grinding grain in either of the rough hand-mills which were in the store-house. He found a means of keeping us well fed, satisfied and looking forward to the next meal with pleasure. He screened a peck or so of barley, put it to soak in a crock, and then, when it was swelled, put it in a crock or flat- bottomed jar, with just enough water to cover it, and bedded this in the hot coals by the edge of the fire. There, under a tight lid, it stewed ...
— Andivius Hedulio • Edward Lucas White

... showed the stucco villas on the green and the awful orderliness of England—line upon line, wall upon wall, solid stone dock and monolithic pier. We waited an hour in the Customs shed, and there was ample time for the effect to soak in. ...
— The Kipling Reader - Selections from the Books of Rudyard Kipling • Rudyard Kipling

... an ordinary "gate" of fitting patterns being drawn from the drag or nowel part of the mould by means of a spike and rapper wielded by the moulder's hand after cope and drag have been rammed together on a "squeezer" and cope has been removed. Frequently the pernicious "swab" is used to soak and so strengthen joint outlines of the sand before drawing patterns, in such cases as this. In this case, before cope is lifted, these patterns must be vigorously rapped through the cope; an amount depending (and so does the size of the casting) ...
— Scientific American Supplement, No. 1157, March 5, 1898 • Various

... answer to W. ROUTLEDGE'S inquiry the following directions for making a graph for copying letters, &c.:—Six parts of glycerine, four parts of water, two parts of barium sulphate, one part of sugar. Mix the materials and let them soak for twenty-four hours, then melt at a gentle heat and stir well. I have used this recipe and have frequently taken twenty or twenty-five clear copies. Once I took over thirty. A great deal depends on ...
— Little Folks (October 1884) - A Magazine for the Young • Various

... indeed, Percy. The water will, of course, soak through; but what gets in will remain in, and the heat of the body will warm it, a good deal. I can assure you, it will be a great deal warmer than having the icy water ...
— The Young Franc Tireurs - And Their Adventures in the Franco-Prussian War • G. A. Henty

... of worms which we had to swallow in lieu of butter or dripping if we did not want to reduce our scanty rations still more. Besides this they were so hard that we were forced to use canon balls in breaking them into eatable pieces. Usually our hunger did not allow us to soak them, and often enough we had not the necessary water to do so. We were told (and not without some probability of truth) that these biscuits were French, and that the English, during the Seven Years' War had taken ...
— The Voyage of The First Hessian Army from Portsmouth to New York, 1776 • Albert Pfister

... "It come out o' the wash all right, didn't it?" she inquired anxiously. "I remember distinkly leavin' it soak in the suds, so's there wouldn't be no strain-like, rubbin' it, an' the dust'd just drop out natural. But now I come to think of it, I don't recklect ironin' it. Now honest, did it come outer the ...
— Martha By-the-Day • Julie M. Lippmann

... queen who put her jewels in soak to buy a ship for Columbus," commented Jack Bosworth. "I read about it when I was laid up with my broken arm. You remember the time the horse climbed into my ...
— Boy Scouts in the Canal Zone - The Plot Against Uncle Sam • G. Harvey Ralphson

... Peter let the thought soak in; then he said, "And when real love comes, it takes possession of your mind and turns it ...
— Judith of the Godless Valley • Honore Willsie

... in wishin'—yit Wisht to goodness I could jes "Gee" the blame world round and git Back to that old happiness!— Kindo' drive back in the shade "The old Covered Bridge" there laid Crosst the crick, and sorto' soak My soul over, ...
— The Wit and Humor of America, Volume VI. (of X.) • Various

... physical fact like endosmosis, with which some of you are acquainted. A thin film of politeness separates the unspoken and unspeakable current of thought from the stream of conversation. After a time one begins to soak through and mingle with ...
— The Professor at the Breakfast Table • Oliver Wendell Holmes (Sr.)

... of this subject. It has been far too much neglected, not only by the material world but by believers. Soak yourself with this grand truth. Make yourself familiar with the overpowering evidence. Get away from the phenomenal side and learn the lofty teaching from such beautiful books as After Death or from Stainton Moses' Spirit Teachings. There is ...
— The New Revelation • Arthur Conan Doyle

... of man must mix with the currents of his time. Snowdrifts in the mountains and on the northern slopes that hold snows in their shadows for the summer's use; and dark mountain meadows, where fogs and rains soak every particle of sod, and waters percolate through the spongy root and soil to form bubbling streams; and the pines, whose shadows make a cool retreat where streams may not be drained dry by the sun; the silver threads of tributary ...
— A Hero and Some Other Folks • William A. Quayle

... up long ago, but one direful image had still been left to flaunt in the sunlight and soak in ...
— Dotty Dimple's Flyaway • Sophie May

... never go, 745 And snuff'd the breezes of my father's home. And thou hast trod the sands of Seistan, And seen the river of Helmund,[44] and the lake Of Zirrah; and the aged Zal himself Has often strok'd thy neck, and given thee food, 750 Corn in a golden platter soak'd with wine, And said—'O Ruksh! bear Rustum well!'—but I Have never known my grandsire's furrow'd face, Nor seen his lofty house in Seistan, Nor slak'd my thirst at the clear Helmund stream; 755 But lodg'd among my father's foes, ...
— Narrative and Lyric Poems (first series) for use in the Lower School • O. J. Stevenson

... day, that weary fight; Reek'd with continuous toil and sweat, the knees, And legs and feet, the arms, and eyes, of all Who round Achilles' faithful comrade fought. As when a chief his people bids to stretch A huge bull's hide, all drench'd and soak'd with grease; They in a circle rang'd, this way and that, Pull the tough hide, till ent'ring in, the grease Is all absorb'd; and dragg'd by num'rous hands The supple skin to th' utmost length is stretch'd; So these in narrow space this way and that The body dragg'd; and high the hopes of ...
— The Iliad • Homer

... right, but nobody in this part of the world had the least conception of what the coffee bean was for. Always as black and bitter as gall. Coffee a la Turque wasn't so bad; but a guy couldn't soak his breakfast ...
— The Ragged Edge • Harold MacGrath

... hour from Anathoth lies the Wady Farah, a name which corresponds to the Hebrew Perath or (by a slight change) Parah; and the Wady, familiar as it must have been to Jeremiah, suits the picture, having a lavish fountain, a broad pool and a stream, all of which soak into the sand and fissured rock of the surrounding desert.(344) That the Wady Farah was the scene of the parable is therefore possible, though not certain.(345) But the ambiguity of these details does not interfere with the ...
— Jeremiah • George Adam Smith

... cherries are sometimes thrown into tanks full of water to soak about twenty-four hours, so as to soften the outer skins and underlying pulp to a condition that will make them easily removable by the pulping machine—the idea being to rub away the pulp by ...
— All About Coffee • William H. Ukers

... to tell you a few more. I've taken my last drink. You're marrying a whiskey-soak, but your husband won't be that. He's going to grow into another man so quick you won't know him. A couple of months from now, up there in Glen Ellen, you'll wake up some morning and find you've got a perfect stranger in the house with you, and you'll have to get introduced to him all over ...
— Burning Daylight • Jack London

... 2 cups boiling water 1/4 cup bacon fat or drippings 3 teaspoons baking powder 1 teaspoon salt 2 eggs 3 slices bread 1/2 cup cold water 1 cup milk Scald cornmeal with boiling water. Soak bread in cold water and milk. Separate yolks and whites of eggs. Beat each until light. Mix ingredients in order given, folding in whites of eggs last. Bake in buttered dish in hot ...
— Foods That Will Win The War And How To Cook Them (1918) • C. Houston Goudiss and Alberta M. Goudiss

... choir" composed of members of the Jenkins household, assisted by a few of their schoolmates, would be given a week from Wednesday night. This particular night was chosen for the reason that the church washing was put to soak ...
— Amarilly of Clothes-line Alley • Belle K. Maniates

... not bear, Why should this bow be fatal to the brave? Because the priest is born a peaceful slave. Mark then what others can." He ended there, And bade Melanthius a vast pile prepare; He gives it instant flame, then fast beside Spreads o'er an ample board a bullock's hide. With melted lard they soak the weapon o'er, Chafe every knot, and supple every pore. Vain all their art, and all their strength as vain; The bow inflexible resists their pain. The force of great Eurymachus alone And bold Antinous, yet untired, unknown: Those only now remain'd; but those confess'd Of all the train ...
— The Odyssey of Homer • Homer, translated by Alexander Pope

... rate will be for a relatively short duration, and during these short periods, which usually do not exceed thirty minutes, a portion of the water that falls on the areas adjacent to the road and that drains to the road ditches will soak into the soil and therefore not reach the ditches along the road. The extent to which the water is taken up by the soil will vary with the porosity and slope of the land and the character of the growth thereon. Cultivated land will absorb nearly ...
— American Rural Highways • T. R. Agg

... stage of believing that mental powers and habits have somehow, not perhaps in the general statement, but in any particular case, a kind of spiritual glaze against conditions which we are continually applying to them. We soak our children in habits of contempt and exultant gibing, and yet are confident that—as Clarissa one day said to me—"We can always teach them to be reverent in the right place, you know." And doubtless if she were to take her boys to see ...
— Impressions of Theophrastus Such • George Eliot

... tool-bag and waved around the " sick foot" a few times, and the operation is completed by squirting a few drops from my oil-can through a hole in the blanket. Before going I give him to understand that, in order to have the "good medicine " operate to his advantage, he will have to soak his copper-colored hide in a bath every morning for a week, flattering myself that, while my mystic manoauvres will do him no harm, the latter prescription will certainly do him good if he acts on it, which, however, is extremely doubtful. Boiling into Reno at 10.30 A.M. the characteristic ...
— Around the World on a Bicycle V1 • Thomas Stevens

... set out the food, the Texan's eyes for the first time strayed to the horses. "How much did Long Bill Kearney soak you for the loan ...
— The Texan - A Story of the Cattle Country • James B. Hendryx

... old woman, clicking her needles with added rapidity, 'I've always said there's no end to the folly o' men. D'ye hear that there cuckoo? Go and catch him wi' shoutin' at him. An' when next you're in want of toast at tay-time, soak your bread in ...
— Bulldog And Butterfly - From "Schwartz" by David Christie Murray • David Christie Murray

... the forests about the heads of the streams so as to preserve the summer water supply. The water runs off more slowly from a slope covered with vegetation than from a barren one, and therefore has more time to soak into the ground. This is a very important matter in all mountainous districts, particularly ...
— The Western United States - A Geographical Reader • Harold Wellman Fairbanks

... and also the vats, etc., for the reception of the must, they should be either filled with pure water, and allowed to soak for several days, to draw out the tannin; then emptied, scalded with hot water, and afterwards steamed with, say two or three gallons of boiling wine; or they can be made "wine-green," by putting in about half ...
— The Cultivation of The Native Grape, and Manufacture of American Wines • George Husmann

... happenings, but also by the vast world of men and women who take an intelligent interest in such sinister mysteries, that the same miscreant had committed all three crimes; and before that extraordinary fact had had time to soak well into the public mind there took place yet another murder, and again the murderer had been to special pains to make it clear that some obscure and terrible lust for ...
— The Lodger • Marie Belloc Lowndes

... given to the process of cooking an article by placing it for a few minutes in boiling water. Marinating or pickling is a process with a formidable name with a simple meaning. To marinate simply is to soak meat in a mixture for some hours, or even days, with the idea of improving its flavor of softening its fibres and making it tender. Vinegar, oil, pepper and salt are mixed together and the meat packed in the mixture; sometimes a sliced ...
— The Story of Crisco • Marion Harris Neil

... plaster is a kind of varnished silk, and its manufacture is very easy. Bruise a sufficient quantity of Isinglass, and let it soak in a little warm water for twenty-four hours. Expose it to heat over the fire until the greater part of the water is dissipated and supply its place by proof Spirits of Wine, which will combine with the Isinglass. Strain the whole through a piece of open linen, taking care that ...
— One Thousand Secrets of Wise and Rich Men Revealed • C. A. Bogardus

... naked protoplasm, but protoplasm enclosed in a wall of substance (cell wall) called cellulose. The presence of this cellulose cell wall, and the consequent necessity of feeding entirely upon liquids and gases that soak through it instead of being able to ingest a portion of solid food is indeed, the primary distinction between the vegetable and the animal kingdoms, as ...
— Text Book of Biology, Part 1: Vertebrata • H. G. Wells

... cigarette. He ran his funny little red tongue along the edge of the paper and glanced up at me in glee. "Don't bother about me," he generously observed. "Just set still and let the atmosphere soak in." ...
— Dawn O'Hara, The Girl Who Laughed • Edna Ferber

... trickling down water on my face from a passing shower? and did I not have to get up at that unearthly hour to move the bed, and step splash into a puddle, and come very near being floated away? Did not the water drip, drip, drip upon my writing-desk, and soak the leather and swell the wood, and stain the ribbon and spoil the paper inside, and all because you were treacherous at the roof and let it? Have you not made a perfect rattery of yourself, yawning at every possible chink and crumbling ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 10, No. 57, July, 1862 - A Magazine Of Literature, Art, And Politics • Various

... 13. APPLE TAPIOCA PUDDING.—Soak a teacup of tapioca in a quart of warm water three hours. Cut in thin slices six tart apples, stir them lightly with the tapioca, add half cup sugar. Bake three hours. To be eaten with whipped cream. Good either ...
— Searchlights on Health - The Science of Eugenics • B. G. Jefferis and J. L. Nichols

... there already exists a considerable degree of obstruction to the lymph stream, and in such cases the lymph, including that which has accumulated in the vessels of the limb, may escape in such abundance as to soak through large dressings and delay healing. Ultimately new lymph channels are formed, so that at the end of from four to six weeks the discharge of lymph ...
— Manual of Surgery - Volume First: General Surgery. Sixth Edition. • Alexis Thomson and Alexander Miles

... carbonate can no longer be held in solution, and much of it is thrown down to form a crust or "scale" in the kettle or in the tubes of the steam boiler. All waters which flow over limestone rocks or soak through them are constantly engaged in dissolving them away, and in the course of time destroy beds of ...
— The Elements of Geology • William Harmon Norton

... the best way is to soak the joint in oil. The oil will insinuate itself into the joint, and then we can get hold of the blade with a pair of nippers, or something of the kind, and open it; and then, by working it to and fro a few times, the rust will work out, and the knife be as good as it was before. If ...
— Marco Paul's Voyages and Travels; Vermont • Jacob Abbott

... it all for her, he went there for her sake. When a man is in love, then all things are the same to him; like the sole of a shoe which you can bend in any direction if you soak it in water." ...
— Taras Bulba and Other Tales • Nikolai Vasilievich Gogol

... embestir assail, attack. embolismo m. confusion, maze, embarrassment, falsehood. embolsarse pocket. embozado m. muffled one. embozar cloak, muffle. embriagar intoxicate, transport, enrapture; —se get intoxicated. empaar dim, tarnish. empapar soak, steep. empedernido, -a hard-hearted. empearse persist, insist. empeo m. determination, desire. empero adv. however, notwithstanding. empezar begin. empleo m. employment, use. emponzoar poison, taint. empuje m. impulse. empuar grasp, grip. en prep. in, ...
— El Estudiante de Salamanca and Other Selections • George Tyler Northup

... a dark corner on one side of the fire-place, where he always spent his evenings, and was neither seen nor heard.... save once, when a cup of tea was given him, in which he was seen to soak his bread mechanically.... He remained, as it were, frozen up; if any term expressive of such a vigorous process can be applied to him—C. Dickens, Martin Chuzzlewit, ...
— Character Sketches of Romance, Fiction and the Drama, Vol 1 - A Revised American Edition of the Reader's Handbook • The Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D.

... the tool to cool as slowly as possible in lime or dry ashes; avoid placing the tool on the damp ground or in a draught of air. Use a good clean fire for heating. Do not allow the tool to soak at the forging heat. Do not heat any more of the tool than is necessary in order to forge it to the ...
— The Working of Steel - Annealing, Heat Treating and Hardening of Carbon and Alloy Steel • Fred H. Colvin

... spring days, in which the winter of man's discontent was thawing as well as the earth, and the life that had lain torpid began to stretch itself. One day, when my axe had come off and I had cut a green hickory for a wedge, driving it with a stone, and had placed the whole to soak in a pond-hole in order to swell the wood, I saw a striped snake run into the water, and he lay on the bottom, apparently without inconvenience, as long as I stayed there, or more than a quarter of an hour; ...
— Walden, and On The Duty Of Civil Disobedience • Henry David Thoreau

... days; in their decay they did not even provide shelter. In fine weather the hop gatherers slept well enough in them, cooking their food in gypsy-fashion in the open. When the rain descended, it must run down walls and drip through the holes in the roofs in streams which would soak clothes and bedding. The worst that Nigel and Mrs. Brent had implied was true. Illness of any order, under such circumstances, would have small chance of recovery, but malignant typhoid without shelter, without ...
— The Shuttle • Frances Hodgson Burnett

... de sofki you pound up de corn real fine, den pour in de water an dreen it off to git all de little skin from off'n de grain. Den you let de grits soak and den bile it and let it stand. Sometime you put in some pounded hickory nut meats. Dat ...
— Slave Narratives, Oklahoma - A Folk History of Slavery in the United States From - Interviews with Former Slaves • Various

... King: I come to thee for charitable License, That we may wander ore this bloody field, To booke our dead, and then to bury them, To sort our Nobles from our common men. For many of our Princes (woe the while) Lye drown'd and soak'd in mercenary blood: So do our vulgar drench their peasant limbes In blood of Princes, and with wounded steeds Fret fet-locke deepe in gore, and with wilde rage Yerke out their armed heeles at their ...
— The First Folio [35 Plays] • William Shakespeare

... done, an amount of oil sufficient to soak through about three layers of cloth should be applied and then rubbed on a smooth surface. The oil should be rubbed in well about the edges. It will not be necessary to apply anything else to the cloth to prepare it for wiping. Paste, ...
— Elements of Plumbing • Samuel Dibble

... tried to make out some sign that would indicate its presence, but the mist was too thick. Yet the light from the living-room windows shone directly down that way. "I believe if I were out there I could see something," she reflected. "I'm going to change my clothes—I might as well soak them a little more." She ran back into the hall, caught up her blue coat, and pulling it on flew out again and plunged off the porch into the darkness, the April rain, more mist than drops, falling on ...
— Strawberry Acres • Grace S. Richmond

... fishing, and it's true You sometimes soak a suit or two: They look on fireworks, though they're dry, ...
— The Story of the Treasure Seekers • E. Nesbit

... manslaughter out of it—I know that because I've seen them try to hang a despatcher for a passenger wreck—they can't do it, Bud, don't ever believe it. In this state ten years is the extreme limit for manslaughter, and the only complication is that if your train should happen to burn up they might soak you an extra ten years for arson; but a despatcher is usually handy around a penitentiary and can get light work in the office, so that he's thrown more with wife poisoners and embezzlers than with cutthroats and hold-up men. Then, too, you can earn ...
— The Daughter of a Magnate • Frank H. Spearman

... all the little domestic preparations—cook'd his favorite dishes—and arranged for him his own bed, in its own old place. As the tempest mounted to its fury they discuss'd the probability of his getting soak'd by it; and the provident dame had already selected some dry garments for a change. But the rain was soon over, and nature smiled again in her invigorated beauty. The sun shone out as it was dipping in the west. Drops sparkled on ...
— Complete Prose Works - Specimen Days and Collect, November Boughs and Goodbye My Fancy • Walt Whitman

... the wheel, and you would push with your feet and pull with your hands, and the buckets came up behind you and as they went up, they would empty and go back down. They had some way of fixin' the rawhide. I think they toasted it, or scorched the hide to keep it hard so the water wouldn't soak it up and get it soft. That was on that place, the Chacona Lakes. That old Meskin was a native of the Rio Grande and run cattle and horses. In them days, you could buy an acre of land for fifty cents, river front, all the land you wanted. Now that land in that valley, you couldn't ...
— Slave Narratives: a Folk History of Slavery in the United States From Interviews with Former Slaves. - Texas Narratives, Part 2 • Works Projects Administration

... Twice a week we have talks on First Aid to the Injured. Professor Duke conducts them. One day he asked Carol what she would do if she had a very severe cold, and Carol said, 'I'd soak my feet in hot water and go to bed. My sister makes me.'" Miss Allen laughed again, but Prudence ...
— Prudence of the Parsonage • Ethel Hueston

... Summer, that he puts all his first running into one Tub, till he has an opportunity of boiling it, and when Tubs and Room are so scarce that the wort is obliged to be laid thick to cool, then the security of some fresh Hops (and not them already boiled or soak'd) may be put into it, which may be got out again by letting the Drink run thro' the Cullender, and after that a Hair Sieve to keep the Seeds of the Hop back as the Drink goes into the Barrel: But this way of putting ...
— The London and Country Brewer • Anonymous

... left me. Rabbits ran into my hands, and the mink, stealing along the edge of the marsh to look for frogs, did not start from me. Deer came at night to feed on the lily buds on the lake borders. They would come stealing among the alders and swim far out to soak their coats. When they had made themselves mosquito-proof, they would come back to the lily beds and I would swim among them stilly, steering by the red reflection of my camp-fire in their eyes. When my thought that was not the thought ...
— The Trail Book • Mary Austin et al

... irritate me, dear. Don't ride away. Gaze upon Payne's young, star-eyed face, my dear. Look upon it well; let it soak into your soul's memory, as it is now. It is your last chance. Next time you see him his face will not be the face of star-eyed youth at all! ...
— The Plunderer • Henry Oyen

... offspring of the devil, Soak the house to please thy funning? Even now, above the level Of the door the water's running. Broom accurst, that will not Hear, although I roar! Stick! be now, and fail not, What thou wert before! You will joke me? I'll not bear it, No, I swear it! I will catch you; And with axe, if you provoke ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 56, Number 348 • Various

... Soak 1 1/2 pints of split peas over night; next day add 2 1/4 quarts water and the vegetables, cut fine; also the sugar, salt and pepper and cook slowly three hours; now mash through sieve. If it boils down too much add a little water. After putting through sieve place on stove and add ...
— The Suffrage Cook Book • L. O. Kleber

... from his war sack, seated himself at the end of the long dinner-table, farthest from the fireplace, lighted a fresh candle, spread out his five treasures, carefully sharpened a stub pencil, and duly set its lead end a-soak in his mouth, preparatory to the composition of a letter. The surprise was complete. Such painstaking preparation and elaborate costuming for the mere writing of a letter none present—or absent, for that matter—had ...
— The Red-Blooded Heroes of the Frontier • Edgar Beecher Bronson

... a pity! Oh, I'm so sorry! If I had only known—" The student of the Early Text stood motionless as I. Together we watched the ink trickle. Suddenly, summoning his wits together, he burrowed with feverish haste in his morocco writing-case, pulled out a sheet of blotting-paper, and began to soak up the ink with the carefulness of a Sister of Mercy stanching a wound. I seized the opportunity to withdraw discreetly to the third row of tables, where the attendant had just deposited my books. Fear is so unreasoning. Very likely by saying no more about it, by making off and ...
— The Ink-Stain, Complete • Rene Bazin

... poor the pile is low, short and narrow, and the limbs of the corpse have to be bent so that they will not extend over the edges, as they often do. When the body arrives it is taken down into the water and laid in a shallow place, where it can soak until the pyre is prepared. Usually the undertakers or friends remove the coverings from the face and splash it liberally from the sacred stream. When the pyre is ready they lift the body from the litter, adjust it carefully, pile on wood until it is entirely concealed, then ...
— Modern India • William Eleroy Curtis

... called Hopkins, gratefully. "I guess you've got sporting blood in you, all right, and don't admire the sight of two men trying to soak one. Little more and I'd have ...
— The Voice of the City • O. Henry

... said Tuttle, "I'd leave my bronco throw me right at him. Then. I'd turn in the air and soak my heels into Slivers's grub-basket and knock him into pieces small enough ...
— Life at High Tide - Harper's Novelettes • Various

... Castlecomer, and General my Lady Dowager Ferrers! Why, do you think I can extract more out of them than you can out of Hawley or Honeywood?(1461) Your old women dress, go to the Duke's levee, see that the soldiers cock their hats right, sleep after dinner, and soak with their led-captains till bed-time, and tell a thousand lies of what they never did in their youth. Change hats for head-clothes, the rounds for visits, and led-captains for toad-eaters, and the life is the very same. In short, these are the people ...
— The Letters of Horace Walpole, Volume 1 • Horace Walpole

... a suggestion be omitted, most valuable to any future castaway or sailaway as the case may be. Eat not your biscuit dry; but dip it in the sea: which makes it more bulky and palatable. During meal times it was soak and sip with Jarl and me: one on each side of the Chamois dipping our biscuit in the brine. This plan obviated finger-glasses at the conclusion of our repast. Upon the whole, dwelling upon the water is not so bad after all. The Chinese are ...
— Mardi: and A Voyage Thither, Vol. I (of 2) • Herman Melville

... entered the house a little later he found that the family had had supper, a single plate remaining for himself. His stepmother, looking jaded and nervous, was putting salted herring to soak in an earthenware bowl, while she scolded Sairy Jane, who was ...
— The Voice of the People • Ellen Glasgow

... who came to put her in that detestable bath. She was sure her skin was being rotted by so much water; she used to feel her arms and thighs secretly to see if they were palpably more flabby. It stood to reason that the water must soak in—where else could it go to! She thought that she walked like a bladder, supposing a bladder were to take itself legs. The whole affair was clean abominable; but she ...
— Little Novels of Italy • Maurice Henry Hewlett

... of gold and red and purple began to fade with the autumnal equinox. It rained enough to soak the frost-bitten leaves, and then the mountain winds sent them flying and fluttering and scurrying to carpet the dells and spot the pools in the brooks and color the trails. When the weather cleared and the sun rose bright again many of the aspen thickets ...
— The Mysterious Rider • Zane Grey

... (especially as regards continence), and does not imbibe too freely; for the penalty for immoderate living is death. The food here is rice, which is the bread of this country. It is cultivated in the following manner. They put a basketful of it into the river to soak. After a few days they take it from the water; what is bad and has not sprouted is thrown away. The rest is put on a bamboo mat and covered with earth, and placed where it is kept moist by the water. After the sprouting grains have germinated sufficiently, they are transplanted one by ...
— The Philippine Islands 1493-1898, Vol. 4 of 55 - 1576-1582 • Edited by E. H. Blair and J. A. Robertson

... and straighten as you go, replacing disarranged utensils, etc. Have plenty of hot water handy, placing in soak those articles which cannot be washed immediately. While preparing one meal do as much as possible toward getting the next ready. If meals are planned ahead, many things for supper can be cooked with the noon-day meal, also the breakfast cereal. After each meal leave everything ship-shape ...
— Armour's Monthly Cook Book, Volume 2, No. 12, October 1913 - A Monthly Magazine of Household Interest • Various

... known the whole of his doctrines from the first taste, then? They were not homogeneous, like the wine; novelty to-day, and novelty to-morrow on the top of it. Consequently, dear friend, short of drinking the whole cask, you might soak to no purpose; Providence seems to me to have hidden the philosophic Good right at the bottom, underneath the lees. So you will have to drain it dry, or you will never get to that nectar for which I know you have so long thirsted. According to your idea, it has such virtue ...
— Works, V2 • Lucian of Samosata

... and after a long wet season, to lay them in the sun a few hours. Your tongues may be dried in the same manner: make a little hole in the root, run a twine through it, and suspend it. These dried meats must be put in a good quantity of water, to soak, the night before they are to be used. In boiling it is absolutely necessary to have a large quantity of water to put the beef in while the water is cold, to boil steadily, skimming the pot, until the bones are ready to fall out; and, if ...
— The Virginia Housewife • Mary Randolph

... going to make a thatched roof, soak your thatch in water and straighten the bent straws; build the roof steep like the one shown in Fig. 57 and make a wooden needle a foot long and pointed at both ends as shown in Fig. 59; tie your thatching twine to the middle of ...
— Shelters, Shacks and Shanties • D.C. Beard

... cook's assistant. He and the women were glad to work for food. He was to help me in the kitchen. They worked outside, and must not get in the way of the crew. They washed dried apples and put them to soak in buckets, pounded crackers in bags and put the crumbs into buckets, making each one a third full and covering them with cold water. I put a large piece of salt pork into my largest boiler, added water and beef essence enough to almost fill the boiler, ...
— Half a Century • Jane Grey Cannon Swisshelm

... are romantick; but there is one thing, that at first thought might seem very romantick, of which I have been credibly assured, that when the Highlanders are constrained to lie among the hills, in cold dry weather, they sometimes soak the plaid in some river or burn (i.e. brook), and then holding up a corner of it a little above their heads, they turn themselves round and round, till they are enveloped by the whole mantle. They then lay themselves down on ...
— The Lady of the Lake • Sir Walter Scott

... all about this queer game!" commanded Dave Darrin, his eyes flashing warningly. "If you don't, we'll shake it out of you; or we'll roll you in the snow until we soak the truth out of you! What do Fred Ripley and his crowd mean to do ...
— The Grammar School Boys Snowbound - or, Dick & Co. at Winter Sports • H. Irving Hancock

... Instrument made of the Bone of a Deer's Foot; yet some use a sort of Iron Drawing-Knife, which they purchase of the English, and after the Hair is off, they dissolve Deers Brains, (which beforehand are made in a Cake and baked in the Embers) in a Bowl of Water, so soak the Skins therein, till the Brains have suck'd up the Water; then they dry it gently, and keep working it with an Oyster-Shell, or some such thing, to scrape withal, till it is dry; whereby it becomes soft and pliable. Yet these so dress'd will not endure wet, ...
— A New Voyage to Carolina • John Lawson

... may be derived from hot application to the sides of the chest if the facilities are at hand to apply them. If the weather is not too cold, and if the animal is in a comfortable stable, the following method may be tried: Have a tub of hot water handy to the stable door; soak a woolen blanket in the water, then quickly wring as much water as possible out of it and wrap it around the chest. See that it fits closely to the skin; do not allow it to sag so that air may get between it ...
— Special Report on Diseases of the Horse • United States Department of Agriculture

... three quarts water, five carrots, five turnips, two onions, four tablespoonfuls barley, a little salt. Soak mutton in water for an hour, cut off scrag, and put it in stewpan with three quarts of water. As soon as it boils, skim well, and then simmer for one and one-half hours. Cut best end of mutton into cutlets, dividing it with two bones in ...
— The Whitehouse Cookbook (1887) - The Whole Comprising A Comprehensive Cyclopedia Of Information For - The Home • Mrs. F.L. Gillette

... let out a little squeak, and fainted dead away. It took, all in all, about ten seconds for the statement to soak in. ...
— Letter of the Law • Alan Edward Nourse

... she had really left him—was not coming back? He stopped by the side of Gyp's bed, and flinging himself forward, lay across it, burying his face. And he sobbed, as men will, unmanned by drink. Had he lost her? Never to see her eyes closing and press his lips against them! Never to soak his senses in her loveliness! He leaped up, with the tears still wet on his face. Lost her? Absurd! That calm, prim, devilish Englishman, her father—he was to blame—he had worked it ...
— Forsyte Saga • John Galsworthy

... unsaddled or as they went up the knoll to the cabin. Not a word until the fragrance of boiling coffee and frying bacon went out to mingle with the freshness of the new day. Then as they sat at table and Comstock began to soak the biscuits Thornton had made in the bacon gravy, they looked at each other, and their eyes were ...
— Six Feet Four • Jackson Gregory

... of fungi in general as a great delicacy to be eaten with amber knives and a service of silver. But Seneca called them voluptuaria venena. The Russians take some which we think to be deleterious; but they first soak these in vinegar, which (adds Pliny), "being contrary to them neutralizes their dangerous qualities; also they are rendered still more safe if cooked with pear stalks; indeed it is good to eat pears immediately after all fungi." Almost every species ...
— Herbal Simples Approved for Modern Uses of Cure • William Thomas Fernie

... replied as he turned away. "Only, I was wondering what he would soak us for them fixtures, Mawruss, if he would ...
— Potash & Perlmutter - Their Copartnership Ventures and Adventures • Montague Glass

... been washed off, and there were several thicknesses of paper on the walls. The difficulty of removing these papers was increased by the fact that there was a dado which had been varnished. In order to get this off it had been necessary to soak it several times with strong soda water, and although Joe was as careful as possible he had not been able to avoid getting some of this stuff on his fingers. The result was that his nails were all burnt and discoloured ...
— The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists • Robert Tressell

... these were the lashes used upon Our Lord till every portion of His body was bruised and bleeding, and they replaced His garments upon Him. Now, you know if you put a cloth upon a fresh wound the blood will soak into it and cause it to adhere to the mangled flesh. Our Blessed Lord's garment, thus saturated with His blood, adhered to His wounded body, and when again removed caused Him unspeakable pain. Next, the soldiers, because Our Lord had said He was a king—meaning ...
— Baltimore Catechism No. 4 (of 4) - An Explanation Of The Baltimore Catechism of Christian Doctrine • Thomas L. Kinkead

... proof are manifest," thou sayest, "That all things grow into the winds of air And forth from earth are nourished, and unless The season favour at propitious hour With rains enough to set the trees a-reel Under the soak of bulking thunderheads, And sun, for its share, foster and give heat, No grains, nor trees, nor breathing things can grow." True—and unless hard food and moisture soft Recruited man, his frame would waste away, And life dissolve from out his thews and bones; For out of doubt recruited and fed are ...
— Of The Nature of Things • [Titus Lucretius Carus] Lucretius

... evolved rules of the charitable societies to his beneficiaries. Of course, there are those who suspect that the benevolence rests upon self-seeking motives, and feel themselves quite freed from any sense of gratitude; others go further and glory in the fact that they can thus "soak the alderman." An example of this is the young man who fills his pockets with a handful of cigars, giving a sly wink at the others. But this freedom from any sense of obligation is often the first step ...
— Democracy and Social Ethics • Jane Addams

... from the outside. There's the plain English of it. We may have to live here on this island, like poor old Robinson Crusoe, for years,—for a great many years. I'm going to stop just a few seconds to let that soak into your brains. We've got to face it. We've got to make the best of it. It is not for Captain Trigger or me or any one else to say that we will not be taken off this island some time—maybe sooner than we think. Whaling vessels must visit these parts. ...
— West Wind Drift • George Barr McCutcheon

... been very inconvenient to me.—He is niggardly towards men of merit. He ought to read the four books of Salvien of Cologne, Adversits Avaritiam. In truth! 'Tis a paltry king in his ways with men of letters, and one who commits very barbarous cruelties. He is a sponge, to soak money raised from the people. His saving is like the spleen which swelleth with the leanness of all the other members. Hence complaints against the hardness of the times become murmurs against the ...
— Notre-Dame de Paris - The Hunchback of Notre Dame • Victor Hugo

... be of that brilliant nature which is of itself charming; and that the young member should think of such brilliancy as being possible to him only at a distance. It should be your first care to sit and listen so that the forms and methods of the House may as it were soak into you gradually. And then you must bear in mind that speaking in the House is but a very small part of a member's work, perhaps that part which he may lay aside altogether with the least strain ...
— The Duke's Children • Anthony Trollope

... very well together, then take nine or tenne Egges, the juyce of one or two Lemons, to make it tart, and make leere of them, then put the meat all in a Frying-Pan over the fire till it be very hot; then put in the leere of Eggs and soak altogether over the fire till it be very thick; then boyle your bone, and put it on the top of your meat being Dished, Garnish your Dish with Lemons, ...
— The Compleat Cook • Anonymous, given as "W. M."

... at pottery in a similar way. The meat was supposed to be tough. "Soak it" came at once, and "Could you get hot water?" Then came suggestions: a stone saucepan, scoop out a stone and put it on the fire, build a stone pan and fix the stones with cherry gum, dig a hole in the ground and put fire under; "that would be a kind of oven." When ...
— The Child Under Eight • E.R. Murray and Henrietta Brown Smith

... I can run, I soon reach the foot of the stream, for the rain did not reach the lower end of the canyon and the water is running down a dry bed of sand; and although it conies in waves several feet high and 15 or 20 feet in width, the sands soak it up and it is lost. But wave follows wave and rolls along and is swallowed up; and still the floods come on from above. I find that I can travel faster than the stream; so I hasten to camp and tell the men ...
— Canyons of the Colorado • J. W. Powell

... soak through our flesh and made our very entrails cold. The grass, the twigs, the leaves, covered with drops of water, were gray in the moonlight. Matara, curled up in the grass, shivered in his sleep. My teeth rattled in my head so loud that I was afraid the noise would wake up all the ...
— Tales of Unrest • Joseph Conrad

... for a Man's Self under their pillow. Let all young men who would toady a great man; let all young ministers who would tune their pulpit to king, or court, or society; let all tradesmen and merchants who prefer their profits to their principles—if they have literature enough, let them soak their honest minds in our great Chancellor's sage counsels; and he who promoted Anything and dubbed him his Darling, he will, no doubt, publish both a post and a title on his birthday ...
— Bunyan Characters - Third Series - The Holy War • Alexander Whyte

... asleep, and after the baby has been attended to, the nurse should place all blood-stained articles in cold water to soak. If in the city, the after-birth may be burned in the furnace or range; it should be well covered with coal. In the country the after-birth can be ...
— The Four Epochs of Woman's Life • Anna M. Galbraith

... it!" he continued. "We'll go to Etois by motor. It's a beautiful drive down there. I made the trip alone three years ago in a car I owned. We'll take our time, putting up at the little villages along the way. We'll let the sun soak into us. We'll get away from people. It's people who make you worry. I have a notion it will be good for us both. This Hamilton episode has left us a bit morbid. What we need is something to ...
— The Triflers • Frederick Orin Bartlett

... method this is done with lump ammonia and soap. The soap is cut into small pieces and boiled into a lather with water, and the lump ammonia is then added. This lather is used at about 100 deg. Fahrenheit, and the clothes must not be rubbed, but allowed to soak for about an hour in the water, and must then be drawn backwards and forwards repeatedly in the bath till clean. Three waters are to be used, the two after the first lather being of the same heat, and of pure clean water. This leaves the clothes delightfully ...
— The Girl's Own Paper, Vol. VIII: No. 356, October 23, 1886. • Various

... PROCESS.—Soak the gelatine in cold water for twelve hours, boil the sugar, glucose and water to a stiff ball, 255; remove the pan from the fire; stir in the gelatine till dissolved; let it stand for a few minutes and remove the scum from the top, then add the ...
— The Candy Maker's Guide - A Collection of Choice Recipes for Sugar Boiling • Fletcher Manufacturing Company

... (605/5. See "Fertilisation of Orchids," Edition I., page 304 (note), where the resemblances between the anomalous vessels of Bonatea and Habenaria are described. On November 14th, 1861, he wrote to Sir Joseph: "You are a true friend in need. I can hardly bear to let the Bonatea soak long enough."), that I might soak and look for ducts. If I cannot explain the case of Habenaria all my work is smashed. I was a fool ever to ...
— More Letters of Charles Darwin Volume II - Volume II (of II) • Charles Darwin

... Mass, and thereby promote the more exquisite mixture and incorporation of the Ingredients. To all which (lastly) a portion of Earth must be added, which by its drinesse and poracity [Errata: porosity] may soak up part of that water wherein the Salt was dissolv'd, and eminently concurr with the other ingredients to give the whole body the ...
— The Sceptical Chymist • Robert Boyle

... The huddling trample of a drove of sheep Tilts the loose planks, and then as gradually ceases In dust on the other side; life's emblem deep, 10 A confused noise between two silences, Finding at last in dust precarious peace. On the wide marsh the purple-blossomed grasses Soak up the sunshine; sleeps the brimming tide, Save when the wedge-shaped wake in silence passes Of some slow water-rat, whose sinuous glide Wavers the sedge's emerald shade from side ...
— The Complete Poetical Works of James Russell Lowell • James Lowell

... say Yes and No, and to know what they meant. I gave him some milk in an earthen pot, making him view me while I drank it before him, and soaked my bread in it; I gave him a cake of bread, and caused him to soak it likewise, to which he readily consented, making signs of the ...
— The Life and Most Surprising Adventures of Robinson Crusoe, of - York, Mariner (1801) • Daniel Defoe

... in vessels; but on the ground it is fit. If ink, gum, or vitriol black drop into it, and its color be changed, it is unfit. If one made use of it, or soaked his bread in it, it is unfit. Simeon the Temanite said, "even if he intended to soak it in one vessel and it dropped into ...
— Hebrew Literature

... he wasn't dead and that when Bonnie Bell reaches in and grabs him by the collar she tells him to keep still or she'll soak him over the head ...
— The Man Next Door • Emerson Hough

... through all kinds of sickness, from measles to broken necks, and she's never quite so contented as when she's trotting around waiting on somebody. I stopped there once when I was a little hoarse from a cold, and before she'd let me go to bed she made me drink a bowl of ginger tea, soak my feet in hot mustard water, and bind a salt pork poultice around my neck. If you'd just go down there you'd both be happy. What do ...
— Shorty McCabe • Sewell Ford

... nice to serve with a fish course in place of bread or rolls and a salad. Slice the cucumbers very thin and soak them in ice water for one or two hours. They must be crisp and brittle and made just at serving time. Beat together three tablespoonfuls of olive oil, one tablespoonful of vinegar, a saltspoonful of salt and a dash of pepper; stand this dressing on the ice until it thickens. Butter thin ...
— Sandwiches • Sarah Tyson Heston Rorer

... himself." The only clue possible lay in watching the doltish London clerk. And on his way home the picture-dealer gave that up as hopeless. "Braun would never trust that fool. He's only a human sponge, a confirmed soak." ...
— The Midnight Passenger • Richard Henry Savage

... Cells. Fig. 10. Very good porous cups can be made from ordinary blotting-papers, the average ones measuring 9-1/2 x 4 in. White ones should be used, so that you will not be bothered with the color coming out. Soak the edge along one end of the blotter in paraffine (Index) for about 1/4 in. When this is cold, roll the blotter into the form of a cylinder that is a little over 1 in. inside diameter, and have the ...
— How Two Boys Made Their Own Electrical Apparatus • Thomas M. (Thomas Matthew) St. John

... Russell, "and have it rain and spoil everything; and soak all the Chinese lanterns, and drench all the people's clothes, and everybody would run into the house and track mud all over. ...
— Patty at Home • Carolyn Wells

... we shall return to the article in "The Call" of March 30, 1913, which goes on to say that "the young people should be gradually educated to rebellion and revolution. Songs will help. Plays will help. Casual talk here and there will aid. It must soak in. You can't flood them with stuff in two days. Rebels that are made in two days may stick in a crisis, but I don't ...
— The Red Conspiracy • Joseph J. Mereto

... first night I saw her. Well, you'll only be finishing what she begun. She broke me; she drove me straight to hell. Maybe it was a mis-spent life I offered her, but when I met her I had money and success, I wasn't a soak. I still had the don't-give-a-damn snap in me, and, even if you're middle-aged, that's youth. But she's like a fever that you can't shake off. And she don't play fair. But she's the only one. You know that, Bob Flick, and she didn't have ...
— The Black Pearl • Mrs. Wilson Woodrow

... the patient goes to bed the attendant prepares to render such assistance as may be required. First she should scrub her hands thoroughly with soap and water and subsequently soak them in the bichlorid solution for five minutes, or longer if there be no need for haste. A large delivery-pad is then placed under the patient, the leggins put on, and, from this moment, the outlet of the birth-canal should be exposed to view. After the scalp of the child comes into ...
— The Prospective Mother - A Handbook for Women During Pregnancy • J. Morris Slemons

... cream in his coffee! And Max coming to the rescue by dropping his watch in his glass of water, and creating a diversion and giving everybody an opportunity to laugh by saying not to mind, it had been in soak before. ...
— When a Man Marries • Mary Roberts Rinehart

... order; "I've thought this thing out from soup to nuts. There's heaps of room for another Monte Carlo. Monte's a dandy place, but it's not perfect by a long way. To start with, it's hilly. You have to take the elevator to get to the Casino, and when you've gotten to the end of your roll and want to soak your pearl pin, where's the hock-shop? Half a mile away up the side of a mountain. It ain't right. In my Casino there's going to be a resident pawnbroker inside the building, just off the main entrance. That's only one of a heap of improvements. Another is that my Casino's scheduled to be ...
— The Prince and Betty - (American edition) • P. G. Wodehouse

... As white and worn as an old table-cloth, Darned, washed, and ironed to a shred of cobweb, Past mending; while your father was sixty-nine Before he could finish himself, soak as he might. ...
— Krindlesyke • Wilfrid Wilson Gibson

... writing on my knee, in our little cabin, I really dreaded the coming of the hour that summoned us to table; and was as glad to escape from it again, as if it had been a penance or a punishment. Healthy cheerfulness and good spirits forming a part of the banquet, I could soak my crusts in the fountain with Le Sage's strolling player, and revel in their glad enjoyment: but sitting down with so many fellow-animals to ward off thirst and hunger as a business; to empty, each creature, his Yahoo's trough as quickly ...
— American Notes for General Circulation • Charles Dickens

... the Loffoden seeds, do soak some in tepid water, and get planted with the utmost care: this is an experiment after my own heart, with chances 1000 to 1 ...
— The Life and Letters of Charles Darwin, Volume I • Francis Darwin

... rather it is like the natural unguent of the sea-fowl's plumage, which enables him to shed the rain that falls on him and the wave in which he dips. When one has had ALL his conceit taken out of him, when he has lost ALL his illusions, his feathers will soon soak through, and he will fly ...
— The Autocrat of the Breakfast Table • Oliver Wendell Holmes

... warm water to soak, then opened and divided by the hands, that the earthy matter may be washed out. This washing is several times repeated, and the flax-like filaments collected and dried; these are easily spun with the ...
— A Catechism of Familiar Things; Their History, and the Events Which Led to Their Discovery • Benziger Brothers

... sat with some one who must go. The small courtyard, full of bleak mist, is now become quite desolate. With quick drip drops the rain on the distant bamboos and vacant sills. What time, I wonder, will the wind and rain their howl and patter cease? The tears already I have shed have soakd through ...
— Hung Lou Meng, Book II • Cao Xueqin

... alternations of feast and famine, and long bouts of sedulous idleness are destroying them as a people and need not do so, then their decay might be arrested and the fair hopes of the missionary pioneers yet be justified. So long as they soak maize in the streams until it is rotten and eat it together with dried shark—food the merest whiff of which will make a white man sick; so long as they will wear a suit of clothes one day and a tattered blanket the next, and sit smoking crowded in huts, the reek ...
— The Long White Cloud • William Pember Reeves

... following experiment: Take any man in apparently fair health, who is not accustomed to daily bathing, who lives at a first-class hotel, takes a bottle of wine at dinner, a glass of brandy and water occasionally, and smokes from three to six cigars per day. Put him in a pack and let him soak one or two hours. On taking him out the intolerable stench will convince all persons present that his blood and secretions were exceedingly befouled and that a process of depuration is going ...
— The Royal Road to Health • Chas. A. Tyrrell

... break you sure. I been with the army in the Philippines, and seen it worked there many's the time, and I never yet seen anybody that could stand it. We're going to fill you up with water; and we'll leave you to soak for a couple of hours, and then we'll put in some more, and we'll keep that up day and night till you come through. Now, you better think it over and speak quick, before we get the water in, because it ain't so easy to ...
— Jimmie Higgins • Upton Sinclair



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