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verb
Speak  v. i.  (past spoke, archaic spake; past part. spoken, obs. or colloq. spoke; pres. part. speaking)  
1.
To utter words or articulate sounds, as human beings; to express thoughts by words; as, the organs may be so obstructed that a man may not be able to speak. "Till at the last spake in this manner." "Speak, Lord; for thy servant heareth."
2.
To express opinions; to say; to talk; to converse. "That fluid substance in a few minutes begins to set, as the tradesmen speak." "An honest man, is able to speak for himself, when a knave is not." "During the century and a half which followed the Conquest, there is, to speak strictly, no English history."
3.
To utter a speech, discourse, or harangue; to adress a public assembly formally. "Many of the nobility made themselves popular by speaking in Parliament against those things which were most grateful to his majesty."
4.
To discourse; to make mention; to tell. "Lycan speaks of a part of Caesar's army that came to him from the Leman Lake."
5.
To give sound; to sound. "Make all our trumpets speak."
6.
To convey sentiments, ideas, or intelligence as if by utterance; as, features that speak of self-will. "Thine eye begins to speak."
To speak of, to take account of, to make mention of.
To speak out, to speak loudly and distinctly; also, to speak unreservedly.
To speak well for, to commend; to be favorable to.
To speak with, to converse with. "Would you speak with me?"
Synonyms: To say; tell; talk; converse; discourse; articulate; pronounce; utter.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Speak" Quotes from Famous Books



... afforded an impressive lesson of the weakness caused by such separation when the parts are not knit together by a strong sea power. She then still retained, as remnants of her past greatness, the Netherlands (now Belgium), Sicily, and other Italian possessions, not to speak of her vast colonies in the New World. Yet so low had the Spanish sea power fallen, that a well-informed and sober-minded Hollander of the day could claim that "in Spain all the coast is navigated by a few Dutch ships; and since the peace of 1648 their ...
— The Influence of Sea Power Upon History, 1660-1783 • A. T. Mahan

... and we can't speak Dutch!" she sighed. "Fancy a procession straggling through a strange town, wanting to know everything, and not able to utter ...
— The Chauffeur and the Chaperon • C. N. Williamson

... found a sunlit room Filled with a delicate perfume, Where, moaning their sweet lives away, A thousand lovely flowers lay. They drooped, so pale, and wan, and weak, With hardly strength enough to speak, With stems so crushed and leaves so torn It was too dreadful to be borne! And one white lily raised her head From off her snowy flower bed. And sighed, "Please tell the children, oh! They should not treat the flowers so! They ...
— More Goops and How Not to Be Them • Gelett Burgess

... gone into the house the instant Mabel began to speak. "I'm cold," she had said; "I think I'll get a shawl." Mabel and I were alone. I believe it was the first time we had been really alone since I arrived. She looked up from the teacups, fixing her pallid eyes on mine. She had made a question of ...
— The Damned • Algernon Blackwood

... rational to interpret the known facts to indicate that in this absence of the Captain and most of his crew ashore, Mr. Mullens, finding himself failing fast, sent for Governor Carver and—unable to do more than speak —dictated to him the disposition of his property which he desired to make. Carver, noting this down from his dictation, undoubtedly called in two of the ship's company (Heale very likely being the ship's-surgeon), who were left aboard to "keep ship," ...
— The Mayflower and Her Log, Complete • Azel Ames

... deemed it a great achievement, both in speculative and practical theology, either to overwhelm the subject with a torrent of quotations from the fathers, or to anatomize it according to the laws of dialectics [that is, the laws of reasoning, logic]. And whenever they had occasion to speak of the meaning of any text, they appealed invariably to what was called the Glossa Ordinaria [that is, the official explanation], and the phrase Glossa dicit (the Gloss says), was as common and decisive on ...
— Luther Examined and Reexamined - A Review of Catholic Criticism and a Plea for Revaluation • W. H. T. Dau

... question is whether to believe it. If we do not look to any of the individual circumstances of the case, we have nothing to direct us but the approximate generalization, that truth is more common than falsehood, or, in other words, that most persons, on most occasions, speak truth. But if we consider in what circumstances the cases where truth is spoken differ from those in which it is not, we find, for instance, the following: the witness's being an honest person or not; his being an accurate observer or ...
— A System Of Logic, Ratiocinative And Inductive • John Stuart Mill

... this what you hesitated to speak, my good Galeotti? and didst thou think thy speaking it would offend me?" said the King. "Alack, I know that thou art well sensible that the path of royal policy cannot be always squared (as that of private life ought invariably ...
— Quentin Durward • Sir Walter Scott

... world is awakening, as you observe. I have been to my publisher, since my arrival in town, with a manuscript 'Proposal for a New System of Education of our British Youth,' which may come in opportunely. I think I am entitled to speak on that subject." ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... himself sufficiently to speak, Colonel Talbot had recovered his usual composure of manner, though his troubled eye denoted his ...
— Waverley, Or 'Tis Sixty Years Hence, Complete • Sir Walter Scott

... as a spectator, is an ineradicable instinct of childhood and adolescence. Most of these plays call for a somewhat large number of children. This need not daunt the producer as the chief characters are few and many of the parts have very few lines to speak. Many extra children may be introduced in several of the plays, as a chorus. At Christmas time, the children's season, it is best to allow all who so desire to take part in the entertainment. Some ...
— The White Christmas and other Merry Christmas Plays • Walter Ben Hare

... parenthetically for a fool. Against the skyline Lorraine saw the rider's form bulk squatty and ungraceful, reminding her of an actor whom she knew and did not like. It was that resemblance perhaps which held her quiet instead of following her first impulse to speak to them and ask them to carry ...
— Sawtooth Ranch • B. M. Bower

... day—a day that I have no heart to describe at any length. After weakly putting it off last night, I was obliged to speak to her this morning of Sir Percival's ...
— The Woman in White • Wilkie Collins

... waiting for me," she repeated—"waiting for me and the storm. That must have come at his bidding too. It was horrible waiting for him to speak—horrible! I tried to ask him what he wanted, but my tongue was tied. Not until after the first peal of thunder did he utter a word. Then he told me the time was nearly at hand when he should come for me." ...
— The Motor Pirate • George Sidney Paternoster

... rather trust, though seas divide, Than linger doubting by your side: Now speak, what turns your heart away; The love ...
— Daisy Dare, and Baby Power - Poems • Rosa Vertner Jeffrey

... Ward shut down the book before him; in a few angry but eloquent and manly words said he would speak no more in that place; and left Castlewood not in the least regretted by Madame Esmond, who had doted on him ...
— Boys and girls from Thackeray • Kate Dickinson Sweetser

... thought by our accent or by the cut of our clothes that we were New Englanders, but he had so pointed the telescope that our first sight of the earth showed us dear old Massachusetts Bay, with its islands and boundaries. I did not speak till the doctor had looked, and then we told the others of our ...
— Daybreak: A Romance of an Old World • James Cowan

... temporized and pointed out that their Government would have to be consulted on the matter of the loan. The wariness of the envoys made Talleyrand's agents the more insistent about getting the "douceur." At one of the interviews Hottinguer exclaimed:— "Gentlemen, you do not speak to the point; it is money; it is expected that you will offer money." The envoys replied that on this point their answer had already been given. "'No,' said he, 'you have not: what is your answer?' We replied, 'It is no; no; not a sixpence.'" This part of the envoys' ...
— Washington and His Colleagues • Henry Jones Ford

... that arrived. A severe attack of fever had come on him during the night, and he was shivering from it, with his face very yellow, and his eyes ablaze and haggard. He constantly glanced at Pierre, as if anxious to speak to him, but his dread lest he should be seen by Abbe Paparelli, who stood in the next ante-room, the door of which was wide open, doubtless restrained him, for he did not cease to watch the train-bearer. At ...
— The Three Cities Trilogy, Complete - Lourdes, Rome and Paris • Emile Zola

... late, appears again. If the child hears some one speak, he often repeats the last syllable of the sentence just finished, if the accent were on it—e. g., "What said the man?" man; or "Who is there?" there? "Nun?" (now) nou (n[oo]). Once the name "Willy" was called. Immediately the child likewise ...
— The Mind of the Child, Part II • W. Preyer

... newly commissioned civilian, disposed in his secret soul to set aside all its proprieties as mere "pipe-clay," its methods as "old-fogyism," and its rules as "red-tape." How many good volunteer officers will admit, if they speak candidly, that on entering the service they half believed the "Army Regulations" to be a mass of old-time rubbish, which they would gladly reedit, under contract, with immense improvements, in a month or two,—and ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 14, No. 83, September, 1864 • Various

... a few hundred yards behind the advance party, but were a good distance in front of the rearguard, when a number of horsemen made a dash from the kopjes which we were skirting, and the rifles began to speak. There was no time for poetry; it was a case of "sit tight and ride hard," or surrender and be made prisoners. Lambie shouted to me: "Let's make a dash, Hales," and we made it. The Boers were very close ...
— Campaign Pictures of the War in South Africa (1899-1900) - Letters from the Front • A. G. Hales

... am not absolutely indifferent to her: her lovely eyes have a softness when they meet mine, to which words cannot do justice: she talks less to me than to others, but it is in a tone of voice which penetrates my soul; and when I speak, her attention is most flattering, though of a nature not to be seen by common observers; without seeming to distinguish me from the crowd who strive to engage her esteem and friendship, she has a manner of addressing me which the heart alone can feel; she contrives to prevent ...
— The History of Emily Montague • Frances Brooke

... could not yet speak, setting up a scream of vexation, tried to stretch after the creature; and whether from his own impetuosity or her careless hold, sprang—oh, horror!—right out of Agatha's arms. A moment the little muslin frock ...
— Agatha's Husband - A Novel • Dinah Maria Craik (AKA: Dinah Maria Mulock)

... don't believe you! all a fib! better speak out: come, fit I should know; a'n't you my own ward? to be sure, almost of age, but not quite, so what's ...
— Cecilia Volume 1 • Frances Burney

... no breath for words, and knew that if he tried to speak he would be very sick. He could only stare up like a dog at the angry eyes. Angry beyond question they were, but surely not malevolent. Indeed, as they looked at the shameful figure on the ground, amusement filled them. The face relaxed ...
— Huntingtower • John Buchan

... and looked at him attentively; a proceeding that caused him evident discomfort. 'Did you speak to me?' ...
— The Uttermost Farthing - A Savant's Vendetta • R. Austin Freeman

... no panorama of hell to exhibit, and I would speak with all reticence on matters so awful; but this much, at any rate, is clear, that the very same revelation of God, thankfully accepted and submitted to, is the medium of cleansing and the source of joyful life, and, rejected, ...
— Expositions of Holy Scripture - Ezekiel, Daniel, and the Minor Prophets. St Matthew Chapters I to VIII • Alexander Maclaren

... said Mr. Pickwick, impatiently interrupting him, 'you can follow with Sam. I want to speak to you, Mr. Jingle. Can you walk ...
— The Pickwick Papers • Charles Dickens

... was barbarous, it made matters impossible. Every corner bespoken, every angle occupied. Nothing left save a nook under the great stairway—a nook shaded by dwarf palms, however, and not too open to the general eye. He half led, half crowded Preciosa toward it. He should speak now, a second time, and trust to ...
— Under the Skylights • Henry Blake Fuller

... individuality; second, for his oratorical abilities as a sympathetic pleader; and third, for his functions as the leading counsel for the Eureka Ditch Company versus the State of California. On his strictly legal performances in this issue I prefer not to speak; there were those who denied them, although the jury had accepted them in the face of the ruling of the half-amused, half-cynical Judge himself. For an hour they had laughed with the Colonel, wept with him, been stirred to personal indignation or patriotic exaltation by his passionate and ...
— The Best American Humorous Short Stories • Various

... the crisis was close upon him. Now or never he must speak the words that should convince and prevail; and instinct told him that he would speak in vain. Nevertheless, he succeeded in stimulating himself adequately for the last great effort. He would fight game and he ...
— The Devil's Garden • W. B. Maxwell

... late? Did you miss the train? This is Elizabeth Eliza, girls,—you have heard me speak of her. What a pity ...
— The Peterkin Papers • Lucretia P Hale

... incredibly long: a curved inky splash. Her hood had fallen back, but she kept the blue cloak about her to her chin, as if it made a seclusion, a protection even against him. But it was only an instant before she withdrew her hands from the blaze and turned to him, with a little smile. She began to speak at once, as if she had scant time, either for indulging her own weakness ...
— Old Crow • Alice Brown

... speak lightly, jokingly, toying at the same time with some trifle on the mantel-piece. But as he turned his eyes on Lucy at the conclusion of his sentence, he saw that the tears were falling on her cheeks. The words, the ideas they conjured ...
— Verner's Pride • Mrs. Henry Wood

... lady took me aside, and began saying so much in praise of you; and when she once got me on that subject, I was ready and glib enough, I warrant you. But somehow, though I then found it so much easier to speak, I find it more difficult to recollect exactly what I said. Is not that strange? And then she said that my happiness would excite so much envy in the great world; that you had been admired, courted, nay, even loved by rich, noble, ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction - Vol. 19, Issue 546, May 12, 1832 • Various

... a hurry," murmured Madame Lecoeur. "I left my stall without anyone to look after it; and, besides, I don't want to speak to him." ...
— The Fat and the Thin • Emile Zola

... not speak about it; I said nothing about it; but gradually I became so sensitive that my soul resembled an open wound. Everything that affected me gave me painful twitchings, frightful shocks, and consequently impaired my health. Happy are the men whom nature has ...
— Maupassant Original Short Stories (180), Complete • Guy de Maupassant

... The hero met his comrades. 4. At the sale many people were present. 5. The ox for David was brought home yesterday. 6. When you go to Ceylon, do not neglect to write often to mother. 7. Near the foxes' den marks of feet were seen. 8. When Johnny whispers, I always tell him to speak louder. 9. Being unjustly accused by our teachers, we deny having disobeyed the rules. 10. There were so many people, I thought the procession would ...
— Harper's Young People, July 27, 1880 - An Illustrated Weekly • Various

... his voice so that by Saturday he was able to speak. The fact that he was obliged to use his voice carefully made it necessary for the people to be very quiet if they wanted to hear. Gradually they had come to understand that this man was talking these many weeks and giving his time and strength to give them a knowledge of a Savior, ...
— In His Steps • Charles M. Sheldon

... second set of senses as you speak of, I don't know; but there can be no doubt that his familiarity, not to say intimacy, with birds and beasts gives him a great advantage as a naturalist. I suppose you know that his little book has been translated into French, and rewarded with the ...
— Tales From Two Hemispheres • Hjalmar Hjorth Boyesen

... the performance of the successive parts of the ceremony is concerned, no special knowledge on the part of the leader is required, as a medicine-man is engaged to give the necessary directions and to sing the songs. The girl lies on a blanket upon the ground, and her sponsor, so to speak, straightens her arms and legs, rubs her joints, and otherwise simulates remoulding and beautifying her body. The girl then sits up, and those assembled dance and sing in a circle about her. An eagle feather and a white-shell bead ...
— The North American Indian • Edward S. Curtis

... comprehensive information to soak in—but the letter generally is not the place for this. Put personality in the letter—specifications in the circular." This is the advice of an experienced correspondent whose length of service enables him to speak authoritatively. ...
— Business Correspondence • Anonymous

... careful, perhaps, not to wound me again. You say you are an orphan, without a friend in the world; all the inquiries I have been able to make, confirm the statement. Let me hear your story; where you come from; who brought you up; and how you got into the company in which I found you. Speak the truth, and you shall not be friendless ...
— Oliver Twist • Charles Dickens

... politician they disliked, or that he ate a meal in company with one, they were sure he had gone wrong. They seemed to think that a reformer could go among other officeholders and do great work, if he would only begin by cutting all his associates dead, and refusing to speak to them. ...
— Theodore Roosevelt • Edmund Lester Pearson

... or you wouldn't have blushed up so when Cad was about to speak of it. Do," said he, approaching her, and putting his arm round her neck—"do tell me all about it—I am sure there ...
— The Garies and Their Friends • Frank J. Webb

... contained an announcement that the Government knew absolutely nothing of these negotiations. The newspapers are, however, not disposed to allow their hopes of peace to be destroyed in this manner, and they reply that "it being notorious that no member of the Government can speak the truth, this official denial proves conclusively the contrary of what it states." It is indeed difficult to know who or what to believe; all I know for certain is, that M. Jules Favre assured Mr. Washburne on Saturday night that since M. Thiers had ...
— Diary of the Besieged Resident in Paris • Henry Labouchere

... stood by her side. The face of Mr. John P. Dunster, even in unconsciousness, had something in it of strength and purpose. The shape of his head, the squareness of his jaws, the straightness of his thick lips, all seemed to speak of a hard and inflexible disposition. His hair was coal black, coarse, and without the slightest sprinkling of grey. He had the neck and throat of a fighter. But for that single, livid, blue mark across his forehead, he carried ...
— The Vanished Messenger • E. Phillips Oppenheim

... Roberts intimated to the Agents that at their desire he had granted them a second interview. He now requested them to be good enough to speak freely all that they wished him ...
— Forty-one years in India - From Subaltern To Commander-In-Chief • Frederick Sleigh Roberts

... be some that will marvel, that Christ did not declare this commandment by some greater faults of ire, than by these which seem but small faults, as to be angry and speak nothing of it, to declare it and to call a man "brainless," and to call his neighbour "fool:" truly these be the smallest and the least faults that belong to ire, or to killing in ire. Therefore beware how you ...
— Sermons on the Card and Other Discourses • Hugh Latimer

... still unsolved, about the methods of lecturing disturbed the minds of the Parisian masters. Were they to dictate lectures or to speak so fast that their pupils could not commit their words to writing? From the standpoint of teachers who delivered frequent lectures, all of the same type, and on a few set books, it was probably desirable that there should not be opportunities of possessing such copies ...
— Life in the Medieval University • Robert S. Rait

... fraudulent. It was about this time that an official whose duty it was to swear in the election inspectors, not finding a Bible at hand, used a volume of Ollendorf's "New Method of Learning to Read, Write, and Speak French." The courts sustained this substitution on the ground that it could not possibly have ...
— The Boss and the Machine • Samuel P. Orth

... by searching find out God? Behold Higher than heaven it is, what canst thou do? Deeper than deepest hell, what canst thou know? Why wilt thou ignorantly deem thyself Unblamed before Him? Oh that He would speak, And put to shame thine arrogance. His glance Discerns all wickedness, all vain pretence To sanctity and wisdom. Were thine heart Rightly prepared, and evil put away From that and from thy house, then shouldst thou lift Thy spotless face, ...
— Man of Uz, and Other Poems • Lydia Howard Sigourney

... of this address, the Lacedaemonians requested the allies to speak, bidding them give their joint advice as to the best course to be pursued in the interests of Peloponnese and the allies. Thereupon many members, and especially those who wished to gratify the Lacedaemonians, agreed in counselling active measures; and it was resolved ...
— Hellenica • Xenophon

... not speak well for the clerks," said Mrs. Weston. "Old gentlemen do have peculiar ways sometimes, but it is not right for ...
— Life in London • Edwin Hodder

... spare moments, few as they were, he was sure to be found digging and trimming and training, with the happiness of the born gardener. Ah, those days! She remembered the half-incredulous wonder with which she had been used to hear people speak of the certainty of trouble. She had felt so certain that joy overbalanced sorrow, that smiles were more frequent than tears. Now she understood, since she had tried to hide her own grief ...
— Mr. Pat's Little Girl - A Story of the Arden Foresters • Mary F. Leonard

... children did as Mr. George had directed, and listened. The man at the door, then putting his mouth to the wall, began to speak in a low tone,—almost in a whisper, in fact,—saying something about the building of the church; and though he was at a great distance from them,—so far, that if he had been in the open air it would have been necessary for him to have called out in a very loud voice to make ...
— Rollo in London • Jacob Abbott

... led him, at the first reports from Gloucester, to plan this visit to the scene of the excitement. And in good truth he had planned it well, and had selected his time with that rare good luck which attended most of his mercantile operations. It had been a "field-day," so to speak, in Gloucester Harbor, the serpent having been visible, more ...
— The New England Magazine, Volume 1, No. 1, January 1886 - Bay State Monthly, Volume 4, No. 1, January, 1886 • Various

... who found me dying and whose medicine drove away the fever. And send one of your hunters also to select a wife from among the Cantanas. It is my wish that there be blood relationship between us. Then there will be peace between the Patocos and Cantanas. No more fighting, no more killing. I speak as headman of ...
— The Black Phantom • Leo Edward Miller

... said, "you cannot help yourself. It is the same blood that flows in our veins, the same language that we speak, the same traditions that we cherish. If you love liberty, so do we; if you will see fair play, so will we. It is natural to you, so it is to us. We cannot escape our blood. Shakespeare is not your poet more than ours. If your ancestors danced round the Maypole, so did ...
— Literary and Social Essays • George William Curtis

... their rumps being of a red orange tint. They seemed to have no fear of us; for, gathering on the boughs of the trees near the camp, evidently seeking our society, they began a most extraordinary concert, if such it could be called, for certainly it was not singing. Sometimes one of them would speak in a hollow voice, then another would bark, imitating Caesar; now one fellow would yelp like a fox, and make a rattling sound like that of a rattlesnake. Others croaked like frogs, and imitated the sneeze of a human being. Had we heard them ...
— In the Wilds of Florida - A Tale of Warfare and Hunting • W.H.G. Kingston

... was hurting me again and I could not speak, but without waiting for me to answer he coiled the rope about my right arm, and told me to stay where I was, and hold fast to the boat, while he climbed the rock and took possession of it in the name of ...
— The Woman Thou Gavest Me - Being the Story of Mary O'Neill • Hall Caine

... like the shadows on snow, and their faces a beautiful shining white. Their straight short garments were blue like shadows, too, and their arms, legs and feet were bare. But they did not seem conscious of the cold. Eric did not hear them speak, but they looked at each other as though they were speaking, and then suddenly the little boy laughed merrily, as though the young girl had just ...
— The Little House in the Fairy Wood • Ethel Cook Eliot

... and hungry. Few, however, think either of food or water. Their thoughts are on the crest of that little hill, where Cunard, McDougal, St. John, Starr, and scores of others lie cold in death. They think of the wounded and suffering, and speak to each other of the terrible ordeal through which they have passed, with bated breath and in solemn tones, as if a laugh, or jest, or frivolous word, would be ...
— The Citizen-Soldier - or, Memoirs of a Volunteer • John Beatty

... wish, Margaret, you would let it drop. I don't like to hear you speak of your mother in connection with it. It—" He hesitated, for was not this their wedding-day? "It doesn't seem quite the thing, quite delicate, you know, to use her name ...
— Shapes that Haunt the Dusk • Various

... that one may step over; and as for the nightingale, if they have the mockingbird in Kansas, they can very well do without him. We have several varieties of blackbirds, it is true; but when an American poet speaks in a general way of the blackbird piping or singing in a tree, as he would speak of a robin or a sparrow, the suggestion or reminiscence awakened is always that of the ...
— The Writings of John Burroughs • John Burroughs

... decided to spare one man the bitter irony of judicial murder. Wesley Everest still had a pocket full of cartridges and a forty-four automatic that could speak ...
— The Centralia Conspiracy • Ralph Chaplin

... rangeland. Again she breathed quickly, fought back tears, fought the feeling that she had been kissed. All through the silent ride that followed she fought the feeling, knew that it was foolish, that Lance knew nothing whatever about that look, that tone which so affected her. He did not speak again. He sat beside her, and she felt that he was thinking about her, felt that his heart was making love to her—hated herself fiercely for the feeling, fought it and felt it ...
— Rim o' the World • B. M. Bower

... I speak of our Army's commanders first, as an Army takes its habits and character from its head; and probably no other Army in the world was so fortunate as to have always at its head great soldiers and great ...
— The Battle of Atlanta - and Other Campaigns, Addresses, Etc. • Grenville M. Dodge

... know. I cannot even conjecture what the monster's next move may be. But I do know this—that, whatever he does, or attempts to do, he will not be permitted to touch you, or even to see or to speak to you again!" ...
— Her Mother's Secret • Emma D. E. N. Southworth

... your hypothesis openly into argument with the Holy Scriptures! I require of you to treat the subject merely as a mathematician, and to leave the peace of the Church undisturbed." To the Tbingen doctors he replied:—"The Bible speaks to me of things belonging to human life as men are used to speak of them. It is no manual of Optics or of Astronomy; it has a higher object in view. It is a culpable misuse of it to seek in it for answers on worldly things. Joshua wished for the day to be lengthened. God hearkened to his wish. How? This is not to be inquired after." And ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 5, No. 30, April, 1860 • Various

... dear Master, with a sigh of relief, confessed that it had "done no harm," and "showed a considerable knowledge of critical theology." I, too, felt that it had done no harm—rather that it had vindicated my right to speak, not as an expert and scholar—to that I never pretended for a moment—but as the interpreter of experts and scholars who had something to say to the English world, and of whom the English world was far too little aware. In the preface to one of the latest editions ...
— A Writer's Recollections (In Two Volumes), Volume II • Mrs. Humphry Ward

... I grant; but the fact is, I entirely mistook the man. Besides, I had a reason for so doing, which it is not necessary to speak about now." ...
— Guy Rivers: A Tale of Georgia • William Gilmore Simms

... anger. He tried to speak, but his voice was so hoarse that his words were unintelligible. A blue line seemed ...
— Frank Merriwell at Yale • Burt L. Standish

... just wired wad I come? I was free at the time, and glad o' the siller to be made, for the offer was a gude one, so I just went. That was firther south than I'd been yet; the audiences were English to the backbone wi' no Scots to speak of amang them. ...
— Between You and Me • Sir Harry Lauder

... have it! Don't talk nonsense. If he's honest with himself, he'll admit that he'll be jolly glad to have it. Thrones are in his blood, so to speak.' ...
— The Grand Babylon Hotel • Arnold Bennett

... seen de Lorgnes make that safe sit up and speak, and didn't know you were his master, I'd be tempted to bat an eye or two. However...." Phinuit sighed despondently. "What can I do now to entertain you, ...
— Alias The Lone Wolf • Louis Joseph Vance

... the advantageous trade which we might carry on! Their situation renders them very dangerous; but if we leave them only their situation, it would be impossible for them to profit much by it. Let impartial people pay a visit to that country—let them speak with the same sincerity as I do, and they will no doubt be convinced that the Emperor of Morocco, of all the princes in the world, would be the least able to do mischief, did the sovereigns of Europe cease to ...
— Perils and Captivity • Charlotte-Adelaide [nee Picard] Dard

... gangway was lowered, Benson sprang aboard, and running up the ladder to the bridge, eagerly addressed Captain Beamish. Merriman could not hear what was said, but he could see the captain shaking his head and making little gestures of disapproval. He watched him go to the engine room tube and speak down it. It was evidently a call to Bulla, for almost immediately the engineer appeared and ascended to the bridge, where all three joined in a brief discussion. Finally Benson came to the side of the ship and shouted something to Menzies, who at once went on ...
— The Pit Prop Syndicate • Freeman Wills Crofts

... where he lives. One can go in search of him. Now that we know that Erik is not a ghost, one can speak to him and force ...
— The Phantom of the Opera • Gaston Leroux

... this Examinates fathers Barne, laid vnder a little hay and straw, and from thence was carried into this Examinates house, and there laid till the Monday at night following: during which time shee did not speak, but lay as if ...
— Discovery of Witches - The Wonderfull Discoverie of Witches in the Countie of Lancaster • Thomas Potts

... Links with the Past, I must say a word about Lord Palmerston, who was born in 1784, entered Parliament in 1807, and was still leading the House of Commons when I first attended its debates. A man who, when turned seventy, could speak from the "dusk of a summer evening to the dawn of a summer morning" in defence of his foreign policy, and carry the vindication of it by a majority of 46, was certainly no common performer on the parliamentary stage; and ...
— Collections and Recollections • George William Erskine Russell

... able to speak to you by-and-by, but you must not be angry with me now. How good you ...
— He Knew He Was Right • Anthony Trollope

... woman, an' she claimed descent from one o' their big chiefs. I'm English stock myself, but the wild breed mixes slow: it's in her blood, Mr. McFarlane, and sometimes it worrits me. Thar's days she won't speak nor eat, but just goes off to the woods an' makes little trinkets out o' pine needles an' bark, and then I know the fit's on her. And proud! Thar's not a man hereabout she'd lift an eye at, and one feller that wouldn't take "no" got his head split open with ...
— Stories from Everybody's Magazine • 1910 issues of Everybody's Magazine

... a moment to speak with his leader as to what he ought to do. This gave The Lifter who was standing near an opportunity to whisper in her ear, for he had drawn ...
— The Four Canadian Highwaymen • Joseph Edmund Collins

... my father called a council. But, when he rose to speak, him the Sea-Lion thrust through the throat with a spear and he died. And Dog-Tooth and Little-Belly, and Three-Legs and all that held land said it was good. And Big-Fat said it was the will of God. And after that all men were afraid to ...
— The Strength of the Strong • Jack London

... a sheet that has dared to speak of me as a "scaly" fellow, and hold my policy up to the ...
— Punchinello, Vol. 1, No. 16, July 16, 1870 • Various

... his charm and good looks, wealth and position, did not appeal to her little daughter as did Edwin Green, the quiet, scholarly professor with no wealth at all. She had mentioned the professor only casually to her cousin, Sally d'Ochte, as she did not feel it was incumbent upon her to speak of him as Molly's lover, since Molly herself did not consider ...
— Molly Brown's Orchard Home • Nell Speed

... now thou dost appear, A creature of that world from whence I come, Let me but hear thy voice—but hear one word Of my blest country's language, and I'll deem The service I have done thee with this spear Naught in comparison. Speak, quickly speak!" ...
— The Arctic Queen • Unknown

... better than that, Galen! When the time comes to slay Commodus—but is Commodus dead? Speak, don't stand there ...
— Caesar Dies • Talbot Mundy

... her, neither will I speak to her. She shall stay in her room, on bread and water, until she submits to her father. What the devil! shouldn't a father know where the gold in his house has gone to? She owned the only rupees in France, perhaps, and the Dutch ...
— Eugenie Grandet • Honore de Balzac

... brave deeds that must go unrecognised in these days. But from what I know of this particular action there was an amount of gallantry and quiet heroism displayed amongst the fellows that deserved more than casual comment. I could speak of things I saw, and would like to, moreover. But as for my pains a punched head from outraged modesty would be the reward I shall ...
— With Botha in the Field • Eric Moore Ritchie

... die, on me I heard him call: No dearer man in all the world is left me for a friend: Woe's me I that mighty man of men a mighty death must end. 640 Ufens is dead, unhappy too lest he our shame behold; E'en as I speak the Teucrians ward his arms and body cold. And now—the one shame wanting yet—shall I stand deedless by Their houses' wrack, nor let my sword cast back that Drances' lie? Shall I give back, and shall this land see craven Turnus fled? Is death, then, such ...
— The AEneids of Virgil - Done into English Verse • Virgil

... is too difficult for me; I have to supplement it by physical efforts. I have not succeeded in any other way; that is all: when I brace myself up to burn myself I make my mind freer, lighter and more active for several days. Why do you speak of my desire for mortification? My parents believe that, but it is absurd. It would be a mortification if it brought any suffering, but I enjoy this suffering, it gives me back my mind; it prevents my thoughts from stopping: what would one not do to attain such happiness?" (P. Janet, ...
— Studies in the Psychology of Sex, Volume 6 (of 6) • Havelock Ellis

... be enough, especially as I have repeatedly furnished evidence from reliable eye-witnesses to support every observation that the critics have challenged; but of late a strenuous public attack has been made upon the wolf story in this volume by two men claiming to speak with authority. They take radical exception to my record of a big white wolf killing a young caribou by snapping at the chest and heart. They declared this method of killing to be "a mathematical impossibility" and, by inference, a gross falsehood, ...
— Northern Trails, Book I. • William J. Long

... will? What is my duty?' And then this able and honest hypocrite has the grace to add: 'A grain of sound faith would easily answer all these questions.' I have a sheaf of such passages. It is sickening work to speak and hear such things. But they must sometimes be spoken and heard, if only to afford a reply to Paul's question in the text: 'Ye did run well: what did hinder you?' How well Alexander Brodie ran for a time, and ...
— Samuel Rutherford - and some of his correspondents • Alexander Whyte

... upon her. Was her face so white then? He must not guess. . . . She held out her hand, commanding her voice to speak easily, wondering the while at the sound ...
— Fort Amity • Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... no tongue—or none to speak of. It is a mere little knob scarcely the size of a cherry. The long, long meditations of the pelican (lasting between feeding times) are given up to consideration whether or not the disgrace of this deficiency is counter-balanced ...
— The Strand Magazine, Volume V, Issue 27, March 1893 - An Illustrated Monthly • Various

... rising, "I don't know whatever got into Frank—he never used to be like that. He just sort of froze up and wouldn't answer my questions or anything until I got so angry I told him that if he didn't tell me what the matter was I'd say good-by to him right there and wouldn't ever speak to him again." ...
— The Outdoor Girls at the Hostess House • Laura Lee Hope

... regarded Tessa too abstractedly as a mere customer to look at her with any scrutiny, but when she began to speak he exclaimed, "By the head of San Giovanni, it must be the little Tessa, and looking as fresh as a ripe apple! What! you've done none the worse, then, for running away from father Nofri? You were in the right of it, for he goes on crutches now, and a crabbed ...
— Romola • George Eliot

... that I would not speak, Charmian began to sing, very sweet and low, as if to herself, yet, when I chanced to glance towards her, I found her mocking eyes still watching me. Now the words of her song ...
— The Broad Highway • Jeffery Farnol

... And to speak out: though I detest the sect Of Epicurus for their manners vile, Yet what is true I may not well reject. Truth's incorruptible, ne can the style Of vitious pen her sacred worth defile. If we no more of truth should deign t' embrace ...
— Democritus Platonissans • Henry More

... literature—the fund from which ultimately, or in the last resort, students look for the materials of our vast and myriad-faced literature. A French author of eminence, fifty years back, having occasion to speak of our English literature collectively, in reference to the one point of its variety, being also a man of honor, and disdaining that sort of patriotism which sacrifices the truth to nationality, speaks of our pretensions in these words: Les Anglois qui ont une littrature ...
— Memorials and Other Papers • Thomas de Quincey

... having some pressing business on hand, as he told me, went away too. But I stayed with my barque to see how the matter of the journey of this boy, which I was desirous should take place, would result. I accordingly went on shore, and asked to speak with the captains, who came to me, and we sat down for a conference, together with many other savages of age and distinction in their troops. Then I asked them why Captain Yroquet, whom I regarded as my friend, had ...
— Voyages of Samuel de Champlain, Vol. 2 • Samuel de Champlain



Words linked to "Speak" :   memorialise, snarl, blabber, keynote, talk, drone on, palaver, deliver, present, mumble, philander, hiss, bark, babble, sing, chatter, tittle-tattle, intercommunicate, speak of the devil, speaker, speak in tongues, twaddle, falter, cheek, troll, stammer, modulate, converse, sibilate, blaze away, bay, ejaculate, blubber, whiff, mouth off, address, lip off, intone, tattle, verbalise, dally, pontificate, dogmatise, soliloquise, whine, shout, mutter, sound, maunder, blab, tone, shoot one's mouth off, discourse, peep, chant, sizz, mussitate, stutter, speak out, gabble, generalize, rabbit on, enthuse, flirt, level, dogmatize, hold forth, yack, jaw, so to speak, harangue, rasp, talk turkey, prate, talk down, talk of, run on, carry on, coquette, vocalize, prattle, smatter, clack, slur, proceed, go on



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