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Speak   Listen
verb
Speak  v. t.  (past spoke, archaic spake; past part. spoken, obs. or colloq. spoke; pres. part. speaking)  
1.
To utter with the mouth; to pronounce; to utter articulately, as human beings. "They sat down with him upn ground seven days and seven nights, and none spake a word unto him."
2.
To utter in a word or words; to say; to tell; to declare orally; as, to speak the truth; to speak sense.
3.
To declare; to proclaim; to publish; to make known; to exhibit; to express in any way. "It is my father;s muste To speak your deeds." "Speaking a still good morrow with her eyes." "And for the heaven's wide circuit, let it speak The maker's high magnificence." "Report speaks you a bonny monk."
4.
To talk or converse in; to utter or pronounce, as in conversation; as, to speak Latin. "And French she spake full fair and fetisely."
5.
To address; to accost; to speak to. "(He will) thee in hope; he will speak thee fair." "each village senior paused to scan And speak the lovely caravan."
To speak a ship (Naut.), to hail and speak to her captain or commander.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Speak" Quotes from Famous Books



... determined to make the start at two o'clock, three-quarters of an hour, or, to speak correctly 42 minutes 35.6 seconds, before the time predicted by the professor as the instant of collision. The modified rotation of the comet caused it to be daylight ...
— Off on a Comet • Jules Verne

... of species, and stating briefly how systematic naturalists work out their subjects. Aquilegia in the Flora Indica was a capital example for me. It is really laughable to see what different ideas are prominent in various naturalists' minds, when they speak of "species;" in some, resemblance is everything and descent of little weight—in some, resemblance seems to go for nothing, and Creation the reigning idea—in some, descent is the key,—in some, sterility an unfailing test, with others it is not worth ...
— The Life and Letters of Charles Darwin, Volume I • Francis Darwin

... thus the Father's character stamped upon and set forth in human nature. The Word was made flesh. This is the highest and best use to which our so expressive word 'character' has ever been put, and the use to which it is put when we speak of Bunyan's Characters partakes of the same high sense and usage. For it is of the outstanding good or evil in a man that we think when we speak of his character. It is really either of his likeness or unlikeness ...
— Bunyan Characters - First Series • Alexander Whyte

... foot, and then, sticking out her lower lip, turned her head away and spat on the ground. This used up the last of Dona Victorina's patience. Leaving her husband without support, she planted herself in front of the alfereza, trembling with anger from head to foot and unable to speak. Dona Consolacion slowly turned her head, calmly looked her over again, and once more spat, this time with ...
— The Social Cancer - A Complete English Version of Noli Me Tangere • Jose Rizal

... of Ivan widened with sudden fear. To have this and to lose it!—now, if ever, he must speak! "Oh no," he ...
— Many Kingdoms • Elizabeth Jordan

... was not with him. He tried to seek the Lord through the priests, and through dreams, but the Lord answered him not. Then he went to a witch by night, and asked her to bring up the spirit of Samuel. The witch could not bring up Samuel, but the Lord sent him to speak to Saul, and the woman cried out with terror when she saw the prophet of the Lord, and knew also that it was the King who had ...
— Child's Story of the Bible • Mary A. Lathbury

... this country, that nothing could be so foolish, nothing so mad as a policy of war for a trading nation. And he went so far as to say, that any peace was better than the most successful war. I do not give you the precise language made use of by the Minister, for I speak only from memory; but I am satisfied I am not misrepresenting him in what I have ...
— Selected Speeches on British Foreign Policy 1738-1914 • Edgar Jones

... need to speak of such things, father," she said, turning aside, "since, even were I willing, the prince would have nought to do with me, who ...
— Elissa • H. Rider Haggard

... tell! Oh, if I had him here, I'd stuff him with chocolate creams till he couldn't ever speak again! ...
— Arms and the Man • George Bernard Shaw

... as to a complete abnegation of the reason. Moreover it was slightly morbid, liable to mistake giddiness of starved nerve and emotion for a moment of vision and of union with God. How much more truly than he knew did Ruysbroeck speak when he said that the soul, turned inward, could see the divine light, just as the eyeball, sufficiently pressed, could see the flashes of fire in ...
— The Age of the Reformation • Preserved Smith

... I beg your pardon: I didnt mean to say anything wrong. I dont understand how to speak to you. Oh, ...
— The Doctor's Dilemma • George Bernard Shaw

... seen energy, power, or knowledge like unto that. The judgment of the Anglo-Saxon chronicler on William may be considered as being the judgment of the nation itself concerning its new masters: "That King William about whom we speak was a very wise man, and very powerful, more dignified and strong than any of his predecessors were. He was mild to the good men who loved God, and over all measure severe to the men who gainsayed his will.... So also was he a very rigid and ...
— A Literary History of the English People - From the Origins to the Renaissance • Jean Jules Jusserand

... in its composition, they will search through it in vain for the slightest evidence of feebleness or decaying power. Rather let us anticipate the general verdict that will be pronounced upon it, and speak of it as one of the ablest of all his writings. But he wrought at it too eagerly. Hours after midnight the light was seen to glimmer through the window of that room which within the same eventful week was to witness the close of the volume, ...
— The Testimony of the Rocks - or, Geology in Its Bearings on the Two Theologies, Natural and Revealed • Hugh Miller

... the Queen, intent on her resurrection under her own conditions had, so to speak, waded to it through blood, what might she not do were her purpose thwarted? What terrible step might she not take to effect her wishes? Nay, what were her wishes; what was her ultimate purpose? As yet we had had only Margaret's statement of them, given in all the glorious enthusiasm of her ...
— The Jewel of Seven Stars • Bram Stoker

... said the Doctor; "and the sooner you make up your mind to speak right out, the better it will be for ...
— The Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. (The Physician and Poet not the Jurist)

... known to them. The Bambute do not tattoo or scar, nor have they any love of ornament, wearing no ear-rings, necklets, anklets, &c. The upper incisors and canines are sharpened to a point. In the forests they go quite naked. They speak a corrupted form of the dialects of their negro neighbours. They have a peculiar way of singing their words. Their voices are low and musical and the pronunciation is singularly staccato, every syllable being separately uttered. They show no trace of spirit ...
— Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 3, Part 1, Slice 2 - "Baconthorpe" to "Bankruptcy" • Various

... of an Indian, with his broad nose and high cheekbones, flat face, slanted dark eyes; but his skin was a dead and peculiar white. He was a down-headed man, and one could rarely imagine him opening his lips to speak; he merely grunted as he shook hands with ...
— Black Jack • Max Brand

... of activity that the resulting change in method has amounted to a revolution. The principle is applied not only in the field of biology, but also in the realm of astronomy, where we study the evolution of worlds, and in psychology, history, social science, where we speak of the development of human traits and of the growth of economic, political and ...
— The Making of a Nation - The Beginnings of Israel's History • Charles Foster Kent and Jeremiah Whipple Jenks

... Duro, we found another Italian who could speak English, this time quite well. We had walked about four or five miles up the lake, getting higher and higher. Then quite suddenly, on the shoulder of a bluff far up, we came on a village, icy cold, and as ...
— Twilight in Italy • D.H. Lawrence

... He funks women. In that Mexican pueblo where we lay grounded on our beef-bones, so to speak, I used to go to dances of an evening. The girls there would ask me if the English caballero in the posada was a monk in disguise, or if he had taken a vow to the sancissima madre not to speak to a woman, or whether—You can imagine ...
— Victory • Joseph Conrad

... wild Hogs." They hired a guide at this village, "to guide us a day's march into the Countrey." "He was to have for his pains a Hatchet, and his Bargain was to bring us to a certain Indians habitation, who could speak Spanish." They paid faithfully for the food the Indians gave them, and shared "all sorts of our Provisions in common, because none should live better than others," and so stand a better chance of crossing the isthmus. When they started out, after a night's ...
— On the Spanish Main - Or, Some English forays on the Isthmus of Darien. • John Masefield

... school began his knack of oral imitations, and when a child, could speak quite as well as afterwards; after his uncle, the disgusting pronunciation of the letter o then too infected his language; he made it come to the ear like an a. Humorously glancing at this affectation, Onslow or Stanhope said "Murray's horse ...
— The English Spy • Bernard Blackmantle

... though entirely sentimental, was nevertheless well calculated to appeal to a proud though unconquered people. A rule was established under which every Manchu high official, when memorializing the throne, was to speak of himself to the Emperor as "your Majesty's slave," whereas the term accepted from every Chinese high official was simply "your Majesty's servant." During the early years of Manchu rule, proficiency in archery was as much insisted on as in the days ...
— China and the Manchus • Herbert A. Giles

... original position, and for an instant the charge of the jar is reversed. The current now flows backwards in the same way that the lath returned back, and charges the jar as at first. This discharging and recharging continue backward and forward, so to speak, until all the energy which was originally given to the jar has been expended, and it resumes its normal condition. In this experiment the elasticity and inertia of the Aether have both been called into play, so that we see in this electrical experiment ...
— Aether and Gravitation • William George Hooper

... whispers that the soft winds utter Speak earthly things— There mingleth there, sometimes, a gentle flutter Of ...
— The Wide, Wide World • Susan Warner

... Gideon Spilett, "let us search all this labyrinth of the spurs of Mount Franklin. We will not leave a hollow, not a hole unexplored! Ah! if ever a reporter found himself face to face with a mystery, it is I who now speak to you, ...
— The Secret of the Island • W.H.G. Kingston (translation from Jules Verne)

... gymnosophist in [1571]Plutarch made answer to Alexander (demanding which spake best), Every one of his fellows did speak better than the other: so may I say of these causes; to him that shall require which is the greatest, every one is more grievous than other, and this of passion the greatest of all. A most frequent and ordinary cause of melancholy, [1572] fulmen perturbationum (Picolomineus ...
— The Anatomy of Melancholy • Democritus Junior

... as mean can be, to make fun of me! I've a good mind never to speak to you again as ...
— Half a Dozen Girls • Anna Chapin Ray

... arrived at a large and imposing mansion, the residence of a haughty and wealthy man. They were coldly received; a piece of bread and a glass of water were placed before them, but the master of the house did not welcome or speak to them, and they remained there during the night unnoticed. In the morning Elijah remarked that a wall of the house required repairing, and sending for a carpenter, he himself paid the money for the repair, as a return, he said, for the ...
— Hebraic Literature; Translations from the Talmud, Midrashim and - Kabbala • Various

... but I have an idea that I shall not live so many minutes. I feel my strength gradually failing me. Depend upon it, my dear Newland, there is an internal hemorrhage. My dear fellow, I shall not be able to speak soon. I have left you my executor and sole heir. I wish there was more for you—it will last you, however, till you come of age. That was a lucky hit last night, but a very unlucky one this morning. Bury ...
— Japhet, In Search Of A Father • Frederick Marryat

... that old lady, looking round alarmed at her daughter. "SPEAK FRENCH." And she straightway began nervously to make a speech which she supposed to be in that language, but which was as much like French as Iroquois. The whole secret was out: you could read it in the grandmother's face, who was doing all she could to keep from crying, ...
— The Second Funeral of Napoleon • William Makepeace Thackeray (AKA "Michael Angelo Titmarch")

... disorders incident, in exceptional cases, to pregnancy, of which we shall shortly speak. In general, however, we repeat that this condition is one of extraordinary health. More than this, in numerous instances it exerts an ameliorating influence upon pre-existing diseases, suspending their march, or bringing about a decidedly curative effect. Thus, various obstinate chronic affections ...
— The Physical Life of Woman: - Advice to the Maiden, Wife and Mother • Dr. George H Napheys

... first acts was, at Pigott's invitation, to help himself to a glass of beer, of which, to speak truth, he drank a ...
— Dawn • H. Rider Haggard

... great many just now, ma'am—not more'n a dozen, counting in Mrs. Standish and her brother and you. This has been an off week, so to speak, but they'll be arriving in plenty to-morrow and Saturday, ...
— Nobody • Louis Joseph Vance

... loose jacket or robe which fits closely round the neck and has wide sleeves, and wide short trousers. Over the robe shorter jackets—often sleeveless—are worn, according to the weather. For winter wear the jackets are wadded, and a Chinaman will speak of "a three, four or six coat cold day." A man's robe is generally longer than that of a woman. Petticoats are worn by ladies on ceremonial occasions and the long robe is removed when in the house. "It is considered very unwomanly not to wear trousers, ...
— Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 6, Slice 2 - "Chicago, University of" to "Chiton" • Various

... brought up in England amongst clever people, had heard grave questions discussed from her childhood, and seen her father grow uneasy as fresh reports of Richard II.'s follies and extravagance came to his ears. From her stepmother, Constance of Castile, she had learned to speak Spanish, and knew much of the customs of the kingdoms south of the Pyrenees; so that it was easy for her to fall into the ways of her new country, though she never ceased to love her old land, and to teach her children ...
— The Red Book of Heroes • Leonora Blanche Lang

... potatoes, who that remembers the crisp, golden slices of the French restaurant, thin as wafers and light as snow-flakes, does not speak respectfully of them? What cousinship with these have those coarse, greasy masses of sliced potato, wholly soggy and partly burnt, to which we are treated under the name of fried potatoes in America? In our ...
— The American Woman's Home • Catherine E. Beecher and Harriet Beecher Stowe

... of most of the species are well-known; and all resemble each other in the exceeding ferocity of their disposition. It will only be necessary to say a word about their geographical distribution, and to speak of a few of ...
— Quadrupeds, What They Are and Where Found - A Book of Zoology for Boys • Mayne Reid

... or two to forget the others and remember ours. There are two or three things I noticed about your playing this afternoon, Thayer, and I want to speak of them while they're fresh in my mind. In the first place, you played too close to your guard on defence as a general thing. Open up there and, above all, don't play between opponents. I mean by that, don't try ...
— Left Tackle Thayer • Ralph Henry Barbour

... They all applauded this Speech, and fell a leaping and dancing around the Box, till they had quite tired and spent themselves. After which the Cacique Hatuey resuming his Discourse, continued to speak to them in these terms: If we keep this God (says he) till he's taken away from us, he'll certainly cause our lives to be taken away from us; and therefore I am of opinion it will be the best way to cast him into the river. They all approved ...
— Cuba, Old and New • Albert Gardner Robinson

... representing the God returning from the conquest of India, crowned with vine-leaves, and drawn by panthers, and followed by troops of satyrs, of wild men and animals that he had tamed. You would thank, in hearing him speak on this subject, that you saw Titian's picture of the meeting of Bacchus and Ariadne—so classic were his conceptions, so glowing his style. Milton is his great idol, and he sometimes dares to compare himself with him. His Sonnets, indeed, have something ...
— The Spirit of the Age - Contemporary Portraits • William Hazlitt

... exceed your expectations. The school is furnished and ready. I suggest—if the other Managers consent—that we open it formally on Tuesday next, with a short religious service, consecrating, so to speak, your future labours. Yours is a wonderful sphere of usefulness, Miss Marvin; and may I say what pleasure it gives me to learn that you are a Churchwoman. ...
— Shining Ferry • Sir Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... this parliament should completely represent the three estates. It was a novel feature that twelve representatives of the commons of north Wales and twelve of the commons of south Wales attended, on this occasion, to speak on behalf of the region where the troubles had first begun. With the full approval of the estates, the ordinances were solemnly revoked, as infringing the rights of the crown. The important principle was laid down that ...
— The History of England - From the Accession of Henry III. to the Death of Edward III. (1216-1377) • T.F. Tout

... it is now, they are for the most part in a debased and wretched condition. They have the vices of our community without its virtues. And what is worse, I speak of the majority, they have no desire to rise from their state of abject depression—no wish to gain a respectable elevation of character. Consequently it is difficult, if not impossible, to present them ...
— Thoughts on African Colonization • William Lloyd Garrison

... I cannot even conjecture what the monster's next move may be. But I do know this—that, whatever he does, or attempts to do, he will not be permitted to touch you, or even to see or to speak to ...
— Her Mother's Secret • Emma D. E. N. Southworth

... rate I should have liked to have observed the dejection of a search-light if it had been called upon to attempt to bore through this atmosphere. In it each man sat in his own little cylinder of vision, so to speak. It was not so small as a sentry-box nor so large as a circus tent, but the walls were opaque, and what was passing beyond the dimensions of ...
— Men, Women, and Boats • Stephen Crane

... should go into each boat, and that the remainder should hang by the gunwales, while the boats were to be rowed gently towards the 'Smeaton,' as the course of the 'Pharos' or floating-light lay rather to windward of the rock. But, when he attempted to speak, his mouth was so parched that his tongue refused utterance, and he says, 'I now learned by experience that the saliva is as necessary as the tongue itself for speech.' He then turned to one of the pools on the rock, ...
— Smeaton and Lighthouses - A Popular Biography, with an Historical Introduction and Sequel • John Smeaton

... They speak of a woman's delicate tact. But daily the bushman put the woman to shame, while she stood dumb or stammering. The Maluka had touched the one chord in the man's heart that was not strained to breaking point, and instantly the fingers ...
— We of the Never-Never • Jeanie "Mrs. Aeneas" Gunn

... it, or by what you know. Oh, reas'ning worm! who questions thus of Him That lives in all, and moves in every limb, Must with himself in very strangeness dwell, Has never heard the voice of Conscience tell Of right and wrong, and speak in louder tone Than tropick thunder of that Holy One, Whose pure, eternal, justice shall requite The deed of wrong, and justify ...
— The Sylphs of the Season with Other Poems • Washington Allston

... or for woe, there is no such thing extant as "Anglo-Saxon"—of all nations, said to be "Anglo-Saxon," in the United States least. What we still have from England, much as appearances may seem to point the other way, is not of our bone-and-marrow, so to speak, but rather partakes of the nature of "importations." We are no more English on account of them than we are Chinese ...
— The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte • Karl Marx

... the oaks speak, or the magnolias? If they had, shaken their white heads, and raising their trailing garments, had all burst out in some grand anthem, I should only have thought it quite in character; and if personally addressed, it would ...
— The Knickerbocker, or New-York Monthly Magazine, January 1844 - Volume 23, Number 1 • Various

... find to have Americans who speak French," said a bearded man with unusually large brilliant eyes. He had been introduced as Andre Dubois, "a very terrible person," had added Merrier, laughing. The cork popped out of the bottle he had ...
— One Man's Initiation—1917 • John Dos Passos

... story was told relating to that wonderful man, from which it appeared he had formed the acquaintance of a spirit, who told him that if he could make a head of brass in one month, so that it could speak during the next month, he would be able to surround England with a wall of brass, and thus protect his country from her enemies. Roger Bacon, on hearing this, at once set to work, and with the aid of another philosopher and a demon the head was made; but ...
— From John O'Groats to Land's End • Robert Naylor and John Naylor

... this forest were two enchanted waters, the one a running stream, and the other a built fountain; the first caused every body who tasted it to fall in love, and the other (so to speak) to fall out of love; say, rather, to feel the love turned into hate. To the latter of these two waters Rinaldo happened to come; and being flushed with heat and anxiety, he dismounted from his horse, and quenched, in one cold ...
— Stories from the Italian Poets: With Lives of the Writers, Vol. 2 • Leigh Hunt

... partly, he has the most terrible distaste for acquaintances. He will not speak to strangers himself, or suffer me to do so. It is sometimes—oh! it is ...
— Peter Ruff and the Double Four • E. Phillips Oppenheim

... need hardly have behaved differently, and for a while Peter was wholly delighted. Then it began to dawn on him that she was playing up to Langton, and that set in train irritating thoughts. He watched the other jealously, and noticed how the girl drew him out to speak of his travels, and how excellently he did it, leaning back at coffee with his cigarette, polite, pleasant, attractive. Julie, who usually smoked cigarette after cigarette furiously, only, however, getting through about half of each, now ...
— Simon Called Peter • Robert Keable

... to abandon you so soon after bringing you here. There's Janet Mudge" (hastily selected as the plainest girl present and the farthest from Gerald, toward whom De Forest's steps were manifestly directing themselves); "let's go and speak to her." ...
— Only an Incident • Grace Denio Litchfield

... both Mr. Wright and the cashier had remained at Farley's after the trial. It is possible they heard a few unwelcome truths; but, as a rule, those who were forced to work under them did not dare to speak too plainly. ...
— Down the Slope • James Otis

... to speak to them, but soon discovered that they spoke an utterly unknown language, and did not seem to understand a word he said. This was a great aggravation to the Prince, who was not accustomed to keep his ideas to himself, and he positively found himself wishing ...
— The Green Fairy Book • Various

... ask me to give you my opinion of the military services of the then Captain, now Colonel, Wm. O. Butler, of Kentucky, during the investment of New Orleans by the British forces in 1814 and 1815. I wish I had sufficient strength to speak fully of the merit of the services of Col. Butler on that occasion; this strength I have not: Suffice it to say, that on all occasions he displayed that heroic chivalry, and calmness of judgment in the midst of danger, which distinguish the valuable officer in the hour of battle. ...
— Graham's Magazine Vol XXXII No. 1 January 1848 • Various

... him, that of Lord Acton, is that he differed from all other Protestant founders in his desire that the Catholics should be exterminated, either by the state or by the self-help of all Christian men. His not to speak the words of love and mercy from the gospel, but to curse and {358} thunder against "those dumb dogs, the poisoned and pestilent papists" in the style of the Old Testament prophet or psalmist. But while the harshness of his character ...
— The Age of the Reformation • Preserved Smith

... you going into the church this morning and wanted to speak to you, but you were too quick for me. I should very much have liked to run up in the course of the forenoon, but that too was impossible. So I send a line to say that I am off at noon on military duty. I ...
— The Bastonnais - Tale of the American Invasion of Canada in 1775-76 • John Lesperance

... Scarborough Castle with its shattered side still frowns above the holiday crowds of that famous seaside resort, but of the other strongholds of the district built in this castle-building age it is not easy to speak with certainty. But the evidences of Norman work are fairly plain at Pickering Castle, and there seems little doubt that a fortress of some strength was built at this important point to overawe the inhabitants. Mr G.T. Clark in his "Mediaeval Military Architecture"[1] says that ...
— The Evolution Of An English Town • Gordon Home

... minutest details of his uncle's experiences; but after he had done her bidding and finally yielded to the wish to speak of his own fate, she interrupted him to consult the nurse concerning the means of saving him from unbidden looks and fresh dangers—and the ...
— Uarda • Georg Ebers

... has all the impetuosity that was the character of the French. They have not found out, I believe, how much their nation is sunk in Europe;—probably the Goths and Vandals of the North will open their eyes before a century is past. I speak of the swarming empires that have conglomerated within our memories. We dispelled the vision twenty years ago: but let us be modest ...
— Letters of Horace Walpole - Volume II • Horace Walpole

... a person who would speak to you, Master Vickars," the servant said. "I told him it was not your custom to see any here, and that if he had aught to say he should call at your house in St. Mary Axe; but he said that he had but just arrived from Hedingham, and that your honour would excuse ...
— By England's Aid or The Freeing of the Netherlands (1585-1604) • G.A. Henty

... at once to speak of other things. The friendship, which it was her great gift to command in all she met, grew steadily between those two in the little time remaining, until the event befell that marred what was promising to be the pleasantest stage ...
— Captain Blood • Rafael Sabatini

... Lord's at the 'Varsity cricket match. The crowd was gay, and not very large. We sat in wooden stands, which were placed in the shape of a large V. As all the hitting which counts in baseball takes place well in front of the wicket, so to speak, the spectators have the game right under their noses; the striker stands in the angle of the V and plays outwards. The field was a vast place, partly stubbly grass, partly worn and patchy, like a parade-ground. Beyond it lay the river; beyond that the ...
— Letters from America • Rupert Brooke

... speak to me of it," replied the shipowner; "but if there be any letter he will give ...
— The Count of Monte Cristo • Alexandre Dumas, Pere

... was alarmed, and said, "To preserve my life, I must speak truth. Know then that thou art the son of a cook. Thy father had no male offspring, at which he was uneasy: on the same day myself and the wife of the cook lay in, I of a daughter and she of a son. I was fearful ...
— The Arabian Nights Entertainments vol. 4 • Anon.

... got a new striped shirt not a false bosom but a whole shirt. Beany wont speak to me now. Lucy Watson has got a new blew hat with a fether. she wont speak to Keene and Cele eether. you jest wait ...
— The Real Diary of a Real Boy • Henry A. Shute

... innumerable echoes Flap like eagles in their eyries,— Listen to these wild traditions. Ye who love a nation's legends, Love the ballads of a people, That like voices from afar off Call to us to pause and listen, Speak in tones so plain and childlike, Scarcely can the ear distinguish Whether they are sung or spoken,— Listen to this Indian Legend. Ye whose hearts are fresh and simple, Who have faith in God and nature, Who believe that in all ages Every human heart is human, That in even savage bosoms ...
— A Hero and Some Other Folks • William A. Quayle

... kingdom. I wish I could send it to you, for I think it might please you. Unhappily, I had no time to write it out, and have not even an outline of it. But I intend to work further upon this subject and make a book upon it one of these days. If I speak of it to-day it is because in this course I have treated all the questions upon which you ask my opinion. Let me answer them here after ...
— Louis Agassiz: His Life and Correspondence • Louis Agassiz

... complex, manifold being is capable of such consecration. I hallow my heart if its love twines round His heart. I hallow my thoughts if I take His truth for my guide, and ever seek to be led thereby in practice and in belief. I hallow my will when it bows and says, 'Speak, Lord! Thy servant heareth!' I hallow my senses when I use them as from Him, with recognition of Him and for Him. In fact, there are two ways of living in the world; and, narrow as it sounds, I venture to say there ...
— Expositions of Holy Scripture: Romans Corinthians (To II Corinthians, Chap. V) • Alexander Maclaren

... three divisions of the [Greek: historikon] or interpretation of this subject, which you have mentioned, I will venture," said I, "to speak only of the first two, of the origin and of the importance of this industry. The third division, of how it should be practised, Scrofa shall undertake for us, as one, if I may speak Greek to a company of half Greek shepherds [Greek: hos per mou pollon ameinon] ...
— Roman Farm Management - The Treatises Of Cato And Varro • Marcus Porcius Cato

... again seized hold of her, and she had to place the child in the charge of the French nuns, by whom she herself had been educated, at the convent of the Sacred Heart of La Trinita de' Monti. When Benedetta left the convent, grown up, nineteen years of age, she was able to speak and write French, knew a little arithmetic and her catechism, and possessed a few hazy notions of history. Then the life of the two women was resumed, the life of a gynoeceum, suggestive of the Orient; never ...
— The Three Cities Trilogy, Complete - Lourdes, Rome and Paris • Emile Zola

... head and quickened his pace. But now that I had once spoken, it was not so difficult to speak, and I asked him why he did not stop ...
— Prue and I • George William Curtis

... this membrane is more commonly limited to that portion covering the inner surfaces of the lids, but may extend to the eyeball when the eye becomes "bloodshot" and the condition more serious. For the sake of convenience we may speak of a mild form of sore eye, as congestion of the eyelids, and the more severe type, as true ...
— The Home Medical Library, Volume II (of VI) • Various

... to drive the Germans out of this salient and begin the spring cleaning up. When we speak of towns and villages, please do not get any idea of distance as in Canada or America in your heads. There is a town or village in Flanders at every cross road. The "town siter" has not been abroad here selling lots for miles about every hamlet, so the result is that a town of three or four thousand ...
— The Red Watch - With the First Canadian Division in Flanders • J. A. Currie

... deception in the hauling-dog. To be a thorough expert in dog-training a man must be able to imprecate freely and with considerable variety in at least three different languages. But whatever number of tongues the driver may speak, one is indispensable to perfection in the art, and that is French: curses seem useful adjuncts in any language, but curses delivered in French will get a train of dogs through or over any thing. There is a good story told which illustrates this peculiar feature in dog-training. It is ...
— The Great Lone Land - A Narrative of Travel and Adventure in the North-West of America • W. F. Butler

... boundary appointed," Glyndwyr moodily returned. "You, too, forget that in cold blood this Henry stabbed my best-loved son. But I do not forget this, and I have tried divers methods which we need not speak of,—I who can at will corrupt the air, and cause sickness and storms, raise heavy mists, and create plagues and fires and shipwrecks; yet the life itself I cannot take. For there is a boundary appointed, sire, and beyond that frontier the Master of our Sabbaths ...
— Chivalry • James Branch Cabell

... I speak of, my bed was taken out, and put into the Chinese paper room, one of the maids who helped to move it, sat on the pot and piddled; I heard the rattle, and as far as I can recollect it was the first time I noticed anything of the sort, tho I recollect well seeing women putting on their stockings ...
— My Secret Life, Volumes I. to III. - 1888 Edition • Anonymous

... he had ridden off some little way, the horse stopped, and turned his head around and spoke to the boy. He said: "Take me down to the creek, and plaster me all over with mud. Cover my head, and neck, and body, and legs." When the boy heard the horse speak, he was afraid; but he did as he was told. Then the horse said: "Now mount, but do not ride back to the warriors who laugh at you because you have such a poor horse. Stay right here, until the word is given to charge." ...
— The Great Salt Lake Trail • Colonel Henry Inman

... of a wooden fort, the citadel, so to speak of the Camp of Refuge, still existed in the Isle of Ely, and was called by the peasantry Hereward's Castle. The treacherous monks of Ely were well punished by having forty men-at-arms ...
— Cameos from English History, from Rollo to Edward II • Charlotte Mary Yonge

... that same day I received a message from General Miller asking me to go to his quarters. I found him expecting me, and he at once plunged into the subject upon which he wished to speak. ...
— At the Point of the Sword • Herbert Hayens

... smiled. He had been a bit of a humorist when he was an Oxford don. "Speak of that to Briggs," he said, "and he would answer, 'Cash for me, and the blessing may take care of itself.' As to the ladies—why, they deafen you about blessings on their humble efforts, and ...
— The Three Brides • Charlotte M. Yonge

... doctor, now fully aroused, "be self-possessed and collected, and state distinctly what has happened." And holding the lad by the shoulders, he added, "Speak very slowly, that I may ...
— The Cabin on the Prairie • C. H. (Charles Henry) Pearson

... I speak to you of yet another tug of war. The place is the same, Runswick Bay and our village green, but the weight to be drawn is not a boat, not a handkerchief; the weight is a human soul. It is your soul, ...
— Christie, the King's Servant • Mrs. O. F. Walton

... in Westminster Abbey. York Minster baffles all conception. Westminster Abbey is a toy to it. I think it is impossible to conceive of what Gothic architecture is susceptible until you see York. I speak with cathedrals of the Netherlands and the Rhine fresh in my memory. I witnessed in York another splendid sight—the pouring in of all the nobility and gentry of the neighbourhood and the neighbouring counties. The four-in-hands of the Yorkshire squires, the splendid rivalry in liveries ...
— A Publisher and His Friends • Samuel Smiles

... He was about to speak of something else, to take away her thoughts, when a shadow crept up to Phil's side and a hand pulled ...
— The Spoilers of the Valley • Robert Watson

... illustrations it is difficult to speak in too high terms of approval. They are so clear and true to nature that the accompanying explanations are almost superfluous. ...
— Essentials of Diseases of the Skin • Henry Weightman Stelwagon

... essence of Boodh, which is the end and aim of all good Boodhists. The mute conduct of his Court, who looked like attendants at an inquisition, and the profound veneration expressed in every word and gesture of those who did move and speak, recalled a Pekin reception. His attendants treated him as a being of a very different nature from themselves; and well might they do so, since they believe that he will never die, but retire from the world only to re-appear ...
— Himalayan Journals (Complete) • J. D. Hooker

... morose confusion. Sam made no pretence of being pleased, but sat, unmoved by Matchin's speech, in scowling silence, and soon went out without a word of comment. The scene he had witnessed in the rose-house had poisoned his mind; yet, whenever he looked at Maud, or tried to speak to her, he was met with an air of such fierce and beautiful defiance, that his eyes fell and his voice stuck in his throat. So the piece of good fortune, so anxiously awaited in the household, brought little delight when it came. Maud reported for duty next day, and soon learned the routine ...
— The Bread-winners - A Social Study • John Hay

... of Beforethewars? Destroyed, Doctor! What good were youth and new things? We are better off now. The world is peaceful and jogs along. The race goes nowhere but after all, there is nowhere to go. They proved that. The men who built the road. I will speak with your visitors as I agreed, if they come. But I think I will only ...
— Youth • Isaac Asimov

... years old, I could perceive the nobleness of the Earl. 'If all thy new subjects be like him,' said my brother to me, 'thou wilt reign over a race of kings.' And how good he was to me when I wept at leaving my home and friends! How he framed his tongue to speak my own Castillian to me; how he comforted me, when the Queen, my mother-in-law, required more dignity of me than I yet knew how to assume; and how he chid my boy bridegroom for showing scant regard for his ...
— The Prince and the Page • Charlotte M. Yonge

... the sun would soon drop behind the hill, and that the Pomoyssin, to which we intended to pay a visit on our way home, was not a spot that gained attractiveness from the shades of night. I had heard the country-people speak of it as a peculiarly horrible and treacherous gouffre, and its name, which means 'unwholesome hole,' corresponds to the local opinion of it. The shepherd children would suffer torture from thirst rather than descend into the gloomy hollow and dip out a drop of the dark water which is said ...
— Wanderings by southern waters, eastern Aquitaine • Edward Harrison Barker

... was much snarling and quarreling in Cymric Land. The people were too much like naughty children, or when kiddies are not taught good manners, to speak gently and to be kind one to ...
— Welsh Fairy Tales • William Elliot Griffis

... Duchess half-way own the street, also carrying a basket, covered with a cloth. They only bowed to one another; they did not speak, because they were going ...
— A Collection of Beatrix Potter Stories • Beatrix Potter

... different nations. The letters p, i, e, r, r, e convey the idea of a stone to a Frenchman as readily as s, t, o, n, e do to ourselves. And why? because that is the covenant that has been struck between those who speak and those who are spoken to. Our "stone" conveys no idea to a Frenchman, nor his "pierre" to us, unless we have done what is commonly called acquiring one another's language. To acquire a foreign language ...
— The Humour of Homer and Other Essays • Samuel Butler

... difficulty which he cannot ignore. It cannot be put even in the nature of a condemnation, since offenses to public morals and to religion are somewhat vague and elastic expressions which it would be necessary to define precisely. Nevertheless, when we speak to right-minded, practical men we are sure of being sufficiently understood to distinguish whether a certain page of a book carries an attack against religion and morals or not. The difficulty is not in arousing a prejudice, it is far ...
— The Public vs. M. Gustave Flaubert • Various

... convinced by the eloquence which had overheated our friend, and we objected: "But those ladies you speak of give their whole lives to housekeeping, and ought cheapness to be achieved at such ...
— Imaginary Interviews • W. D. Howells

... ever seek to deduct the amount of his account at the Custom House?-Never from me. I cannot speak for ...
— Second Shetland Truck System Report • William Guthrie

... still kneeling on the stone floor, but quite powerless to move; and they lifted him, and carried him to his room, and there they found, to their horror, that he had had no bed; he had lain on the stones; and then they took him to the Superior's own room, and laid him in the bed, and he did not speak any more, and at ...
— Ramona • Helen Hunt Jackson



Words linked to "Speak" :   sound, blunder out, jabber, shoot one's mouth off, murmur, mutter, gibber, hiss, blaze away, philander, tattle, slur, prattle, level, lip off, read, rant, mussitate, speak for, butterfly, talk, dally, dogmatize, falter, proceed, clack, blurt, rasp, speaker, troll, address, spout, continue, talk about, rave, babble, generalize, twaddle, sizz, speak out, blab, swallow, bay, verbalise, speech, cackle, speak of the devil, intone, soliloquise, spiel, monologuise, palaver, utter, enthuse, orate, chatter, snarl, soliloquize, stammer, rattle on, mumble, dogmatise, snap, smatter, intercommunicate, rap, mouth, yack away, vocalise, phonate, keynote, drone, blubber out, yack, blabber, peep, inflect, drone on, talk down, dish the dirt, shout, mash, yap away, speak in tongues, present, deliver, tone, tittle-tattle, begin, prate, monologuize, jaw, sing, talk of, chant, stutter, modulate, blubber, talk turkey, vocalize, whisper, bumble, coquette, communicate, run on, blunder, go on, memorialise, mouth off, harangue, speak up, hold forth, bark, speaking, memorialize, pontificate, sibilate, piffle, whiff, cheek, flirt, siss, carry on, so to speak, snivel, dissertate, generalise, coquet, whine, rabbit on, slang, gulp, chat up, verbalize, ejaculate, blurt out, converse



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