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Turn   Listen
verb
Turn  v. t.  (past & past part. turned; pres. part. turning)  
1.
To cause to move upon a center, or as if upon a center; to give circular motion to; to cause to revolve; to cause to move round, either partially, wholly, or repeatedly; to make to change position so as to present other sides in given directions; to make to face otherwise; as, to turn a wheel or a spindle; to turn the body or the head. "Turn the adamantine spindle round." "The monarch turns him to his royal guest."
2.
To cause to present a different side uppermost or outmost; to make the upper side the lower, or the inside to be the outside of; to reverse the position of; as, to turn a box or a board; to turn a coat.
3.
To give another direction, tendency, or inclination to; to direct otherwise; to deflect; to incline differently; used both literally and figuratively; as, to turn the eyes to the heavens; to turn a horse from the road, or a ship from her course; to turn the attention to or from something. "Expert when to advance, or stand, or, turn the sway of battle." "Thrice I deluded her, and turned to sport Her importunity." "My thoughts are turned on peace."
4.
To change from a given use or office; to divert, as to another purpose or end; to transfer; to use or employ; to apply; to devote. "Therefore he slew him, and turned the kingdom unto David." "God will make these evils the occasion of a greater good, by turning them to advantage in this world." "When the passage is open, land will be turned most to cattle; when shut, to sheep."
5.
To change the form, quality, aspect, or effect of; to alter; to metamorphose; to convert; to transform; often with to or into before the word denoting the effect or product of the change; as, to turn a worm into a winged insect; to turn green to blue; to turn prose into verse; to turn a Whig to a Tory, or a Hindu to a Christian; to turn good to evil, and the like. "The Lord thy God will turn thy captivity, and have compassion upon thee." "And David said, O Lord, I pray thee, turn the counsel of Ahithophel into foolishness." "Impatience turns an ague into a fever."
6.
To form in a lathe; to shape or fashion (anything) by applying a cutting tool to it while revolving; as, to turn the legs of stools or tables; to turn ivory or metal. "I had rather hear a brazen canstick turned."
7.
Hence, to give form to; to shape; to mold; to put in proper condition; to adapt. "The poet's pen turns them to shapes." "His limbs how turned, how broad his shoulders spread!" "He was perfectly well turned for trade."
8.
Specifically:
(a)
To translate; to construe; as, to turn the Iliad. "Who turns a Persian tale for half a crown."
(b)
To make acid or sour; to ferment; to curdle, etc.: as, to turn cider or wine; electricity turns milk quickly.
(c)
To sicken; to nauseate; as, an emetic turns one's stomach.
9.
To make a turn about or around (something); to go or pass around by turning; as, to turn a corner. "The ranges are not high or steep, and one can turn a kopje instead of cutting or tunneling through it."
To be turned of, to be advanced beyond; as, to be turned of sixty-six.
To turn a cold shoulder to, to treat with neglect or indifference.
To turn a corner,
(a)
to go round a corner.
(b)
(Fig.) To advance beyond a difficult stage in a project, or in life.
To turn adrift, to cast off, to cease to care for.
To turn a flange (Mech.), to form a flange on, as around a metal sheet or boiler plate, by stretching, bending, and hammering, or rolling the metal.
To turn against.
(a)
To direct against; as, to turn one's arguments against himself.
(b)
To make unfavorable or hostile to; as, to turn one's friends against him.
To turn a hostile army, To turn the enemy's flank, or the like (Mil.), to pass round it, and take a position behind it or upon its side.
To turn a penny, or To turn an honest penny, to make a small profit by trade, or the like.
To turn around one's finger, to have complete control of the will and actions of; to be able to influence at pleasure.
To turn aside, to avert.
To turn away.
(a)
To dismiss from service; to discard; as, to turn away a servant.
(b)
To avert; as, to turn away wrath or evil.
To turn back.
(a)
To give back; to return. "We turn not back the silks upon the merchants, When we have soiled them."
(b)
To cause to return or retrace one's steps; hence, to drive away; to repel.
To turn down.
(a)
To fold or double down.
(b)
To turn over so as to conceal the face of; as, to turn down cards.
(c)
To lower, or reduce in size, by turning a valve, stopcock, or the like; as, turn down the lights.
To turn in.
(a)
To fold or double under; as, to turn in the edge of cloth.
(b)
To direct inwards; as, to turn the toes in when walking.
(c)
To contribute; to deliver up; as, he turned in a large amount. (Colloq.)
To turn in the mind, to revolve, ponder, or meditate upon; with about, over, etc. " Turn these ideas about in your mind."
To turn off.
(a)
To dismiss contemptuously; as, to turn off a sycophant or a parasite.
(b)
To give over; to reduce.
(c)
To divert; to deflect; as, to turn off the thoughts from serious subjects; to turn off a joke.
(d)
To accomplish; to perform, as work.
(e)
(Mech.) To remove, as a surface, by the process of turning; to reduce in size by turning.
(f)
To shut off, as a fluid, by means of a valve, stopcock, or other device; to stop the passage of; as, to turn off the water or the gas.
To turn on, to cause to flow by turning a valve, stopcock, or the like; to give passage to; as, to turn on steam.
To turn one's coat, to change one's uniform or colors; to go over to the opposite party.
To turn one's goods or To turn one's money, and the like, to exchange in the course of trade; to keep in lively exchange or circulation; to gain or increase in trade.
To turn one's hand to, to adapt or apply one's self to; to engage in.
To turn out.
(a)
To drive out; to expel; as, to turn a family out of doors; to turn a man out of office. "I'll turn you out of my kingdom."
(b)
to put to pasture, as cattle or horses.
(c)
To produce, as the result of labor, or any process of manufacture; to furnish in a completed state.
(d)
To reverse, as a pocket, bag, etc., so as to bring the inside to the outside; hence, to produce.
(e)
To cause to cease, or to put out, by turning a stopcock, valve, or the like; as, to turn out the lights.
To turn over.
(a)
To change or reverse the position of; to overset; to overturn; to cause to roll over.
(b)
To transfer; as, to turn over business to another hand.
(c)
To read or examine, as a book, while, turning the leaves. "We turned o'er many books together."
(d)
To handle in business; to do business to the amount of; as, he turns over millions a year. (Colloq.)
To turn over a new leaf. See under Leaf.
To turn tail, to run away; to retreat ignominiously.
To turn the back, to flee; to retreat.
To turn the back on or
To turn the back upon, to treat with contempt; to reject or refuse unceremoniously.
To turn the corner, to pass the critical stage; to get by the worst point; hence, to begin to improve, or to succeed.
To turn the die or To turn the dice, to change fortune.
To turn the edge of or To turn the point of, to bend over the edge or point of so as to make dull; to blunt.
To turn the head of or To turn the brain of, to make giddy, wild, insane, or the like; to infatuate; to overthrow the reason or judgment of; as, a little success turned his head.
To turn the scale or To turn the balance, to change the preponderance; to decide or determine something doubtful; to tip the balance.
To turn the stomach of, to nauseate; to sicken.
To turn the tables, to reverse the chances or conditions of success or superiority; to give the advantage to the person or side previously at a disadvantage.
To turn tippet, to make a change. (Obs.)
To turn to profit, To turn to advantage, etc., to make profitable or advantageous.
To turn turtle, to capsize bottom upward; said of a vessel. (Naut. slang)
To turn under (Agric.), to put, as soil, manure, etc., underneath from the surface by plowing, digging, or the like.
To turn up.
(a)
To turn so as to bring the bottom side on top; as, to turn up the trump.
(b)
To bring from beneath to the surface, as in plowing, digging, etc.
(c)
To give an upward curve to; to tilt; as, to turn up the nose.
To turn upon, to retort; to throw back; as, to turn the arguments of an opponent upon himself.
To turn upside down, to confuse by putting things awry; to throw into disorder. "This house is turned upside down since Robin Ostler died."






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Turn" Quotes from Famous Books



... Fanshaw. "We have learned ladies now, wherever one goes, who tell one they never play at cards—I am sure they are very bad company. Jane," said she, turning to her daughter, "I hope you won't take it into your head to turn out ...
— Tales And Novels, Volume 1 • Maria Edgeworth

... McIver would set us to fighting each other. You would have Billy deny his dependence upon me and use his strength to destroy me, thus depriving himself of the help he must have if he would live. McIver would have me deny my dependence upon Billy and by antagonizing him with my assumed superiority turn his strength to the destruction of our comradeship by which I also live. Your teaching of class loyalty and class hatred applied to Billy and me would result in the ruin of our basket making and ...
— Helen of the Old House • Harold Bell Wright

... is as well to put his features on record and pigeon-hole them, if only that we may recognize him on that day when the pendulum shall swing him triumphantly back into our midst, and "locality" shall in its turn ...
— Adventures in Criticism • Sir Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... Turn now to Simoorie where, lapped in his ease, The Captain is petting the Bride on his knees, Where the whit of the bullet, the wounded man's scream Are mixed as the mist of some devilish dream— Forgotten, forgotten the sweat of the shambles Where the hill-daisy blooms and ...
— The Works of Rudyard Kipling One Volume Edition • Rudyard Kipling

... went first to his mother's house, and it is said he turned water into wine on one occasion at a marriage feast; but that cannot be true, for if it were, there is no reason that I can see why he should stay his hand and not turn all water into wine. To which Joseph replied that it would be a great misfortune, for the greater part of men would be as drunk as Noah was when he planted a vineyard, and we know how Lot's daughters turned their father's ...
— The Brook Kerith - A Syrian story • George Moore

... would have his place and work found for him, but No. 5 might not find it easy to turn to ...
— The Pillars of the House, V1 • Charlotte M. Yonge

... word against the French lassie, as ye ca' her, do ye ken what I'll do? I'll take ye back to my faither by the lug, and I'll tell him ye were sweerin' like a trooper down by the burn, and every one o' us will testify against you, and then, I'm thinking, it will be your turn to ...
— The World's Greatest Books, Vol. I • Various

... The flight of hovering bird, the pulse that beats In offered victims, and the levin bolt. All monsters first, by most unnatural birth Brought into being, in accursd flames He bids consume (26). Then round the walls of Rome Each trembling citizen in turn proceeds. The priests, chief guardians of the public faith, With holy sprinkling purge the open space That borders on the wall; in sacred garb Follows the lesser crowd: the Vestals come By priestess ...
— Pharsalia; Dramatic Episodes of the Civil Wars • Lucan

... business of the day might be, or what obstacles or discouragements had been encountered, his cheerfulness was perennial and unfailing. Mirth and good cheer were apparently inborn and organic with him. He could no more suppress them than a fountain could cease bubbling up, or a river turn backward in its course. And what men and women he has had, first and last, at his table; it is impossible to exhaust the list or exaggerate its quality. Horace Greeley, Henry Ward Beecher, E. H. Chapin, Bayard Taylor, Mark Twain, and the Cary ...
— A Unique Story of a Marvellous Career. Life of Hon. Phineas T. • Joel Benton

... my hand, and I had him tarred down to his feet before he knew what I was at. "Turn round the other side now," I said, "and you'll be able to sit where you like." Then he felt the tar coming in hot against his skin and he began cursing my soul, and I was sorry for the ...
— The Aran Islands • John M. Synge

... has worked hard, but she is not young." It was Mrs. Travers who spoke. "She's afraid of the winter there. I rather think, since you want to go back, that she will be glad to turn your domain over to you ...
— The Amazing Interlude • Mary Roberts Rinehart

... not? and I daresay you think me a croaker; but there is a melancholy satisfaction in trying to see things as they are, and I believe what I have told you is nearer the truth than what you get from the papers. I only hope I may turn out to be wrong. ...
— With Rimington • L. March Phillipps

... it is my turn now," said Mary, "as long as you want to save Minnie for the last. Could you let me say you a little poetry, or was Luella's enough? I think some poetry sort of ...
— The Girl Scouts at Home - or Rosanna's Beautiful Day • Katherine Keene Galt

... How, for our gain in both worlds, can we best economise our scepticism and make a little belief go far?[69] The nineteenth century is not precisely the age of the martyrs, or, if we are to find them, we must in general turn to politics and to science; Bishop Blougram does not pique himself on a genius for martyrdom; if he fights with beasts, it is on this occasion with a very small one, a lynx of the literary tribe, and in the arena of his own dining-room over the after-dinner wine. He is pre-eminently ...
— Robert Browning • Edward Dowden

... Princeton grenadier of a hat. Beside it all, he felt himself dwindling into insignificance, despite the hind-side-before waistcoats of the visiting clergymen and his mother's gown of stiff black satin. It was a positive relief to him when he could turn his back upon the whole hot, chattering function, and, with Catia's new gilt-initialled bag to balance his much-rubbed suitcase, go striding away to the station underneath the wintry freshness of the night. Catia had rebelled at the idea of walking to their train; but the one hack afforded by ...
— The Brentons • Anna Chapin Ray

... was also a representation of the fort, but in this case it was drawn without a door. Looking over the parapet were a number of white men with guns in their hands, which they were pointing at a party of Malays on the ground below, who in turn were pointing guns at the whites; whilst to the right of this picture was drawn another group, a most sinister one, for it represented Gaunt and Percy bound to two trees and surrounded by a pile of—presumably—branches, to which other Malays were in the act of applying ...
— The Missing Merchantman • Harry Collingwood

... Decidedly these marriages turn out better than the made-up marriages in France. I will go further, and seriously affirm my belief that the marriages in Kerry show a greater average of happiness than any which can be mentioned. To be sure there is the same dash after heiresses in Kerry that you ...
— The Reminiscences of an Irish Land Agent • S.M. Hussey

... blamed, from Argos, by his present untimely precipitation. Meanwhile Agis, whether in consequence of this halloo or of some sudden new idea of his own, quickly led back his army without engaging, and entering the Tegean territory, began to turn off into that of Mantinea the water about which the Mantineans and Tegeans are always fighting, on account of the extensive damage it does to whichever of the two countries it falls into. His object in this ...
— The History of the Peloponnesian War • Thucydides

... thing, Dagaeoga, but whenever there is war in the woods among men the wolves grow numerous, powerful and bold. They know that when men turn their arms upon one another they are turned aside from the wolves. They hang upon the fringes of the bands and armies, and where the wounded are they learn to attack. I have noticed, too, since the great war began ...
— The Rulers of the Lakes - A Story of George and Champlain • Joseph A. Altsheler

... that is, somewhere between 640 and 610 years before Christ, so that he was contemporary with Jeremiah and Zephaniah. The theme of his prophecy is, first, the overthrow of Judea by the Chaldeans, and then the overthrow in turn of the Chaldean monarchy, each power in turn for its sins. In the first chapter he predicts in a dramatic form—that of expostulation with God on the part of the prophet, and God's answer—the approaching ...
— Companion to the Bible • E. P. Barrows

... carried her home, the boy holding one stirrup and the man the other and saying, "Allah vouchsafe thee ease and recovery!" "These then, O King," (said the damsel) "are some instances of the craft of men and their perfidy; wherefore let not thy Wazirs turn thee from succouring me and doing me justice." Then she wept, and when the King saw her weeping (for she was the dearest to him of all his slave-girls) he once more commanded to put his son to death; but the sixth Minister entered and kissing ground before him, said, "May the Almighty ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 6 • Richard F. Burton

... he rose unsteadily to his feet. His head seemed whirling in the throes of a terrific headache. The men about him were looking anxiously at him. He glanced toward Morey. He was sleeping deeply in the seat, his features now and again reflecting his sensations. It was his turn to learn this new language ...
— The Black Star Passes • John W Campbell

... November 1790, a dismissed captain replying to the regrets of his company in the following style: "Console yourselves, my companions, I shall not quit you; only, henceforward I shall be a simple fusilier; if you see me resolved to be no longer your chief, it is because I am content to command in my turn." ...
— Biographies of Distinguished Scientific Men • Francois Arago

... was once met by Fortune, who promised to fill his wallet with gold, as much as he might desire, on condition that whatever touched the ground should turn at once to dust. The beggar opened his wallet, asked for more and yet more, until the bag burst. The gold fell to the ...
— Pushing to the Front • Orison Swett Marden

... seemed to please and astonish them most of all were the bath-rooms with their white porcelain tubs, tiled floors, and shining silver knobs, which one had only to turn in order to have hot or cold water, either salt or fresh, in the tub, the basin, or the shower. Even the electric piano failed to impress them as did this aqueous marvel, and they crossed themselves and called on the Virgin ...
— A Woman's Journey through the Philippines - On a Cable Ship that Linked Together the Strange Lands Seen En Route • Florence Kimball Russel

... It was his turn now, and, full of activity, he crept out of the window and stood for a moment amongst the ivy in the gutter, and then began to slide so quickly down the double rope that his hands were ready to burn. As he touched the soft earth he felt ...
— The New Forest Spy • George Manville Fenn

... leads it about as a rider does a well- managed horse. He distributes it as he pleases; he raises it to the top of steep mountains, and makes use of its weight to let it fall, in order to rise again, as high as it was at first. But man who leads waters with such absolute command is in his turn led by them. Water is one of the greatest moving powers that man can employ to supply his defects in the most necessary arts, either through the smallness or weakness of his body. But the waters which, notwithstanding their fluidity, are such ponderous bodies, do nevertheless ...
— The Existence of God • Francois de Salignac de La Mothe- Fenelon

... bleeved when I says, as he cums back and he says, says he, "If you plase, Sir, sure the Pepper's engaged!" I thort the Guvner wood ha larfed hisself hill, but he soon recovered, and said, "Thin niver mind TIM, we'll do without it to-day, but let us have fust turn at it to-morrow." "Suttenly, your honour," says TIM, ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 103, November 5, 1892 • Various

... themselves easily divided by the bodies which come in from without. In this way every animal is overcome and decays, and this affection is called old age. And at last, when the bonds by which the triangles of the marrow are united no longer hold, and are parted by the strain of existence, they in turn loosen the bonds of the soul, and she, obtaining a natural release, flies away with joy. For that which takes place according to nature is pleasant, but that which is contrary to nature is painful. ...
— Timaeus • Plato

... Saturday, Mr. Wesley walked over to Epworth, to a room above a chandler's shop, where he and John lodged in turn as they took Epworth duty on alternate Sundays. The Rectory there was closed for the time and untenanted, the Ellisons having returned some months before to their own enlarged and newly furnished house. There, to be sure, a lodging might have been ...
— Hetty Wesley • Sir Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... parents tell about the Ku Klux come and made them cook them something to eat. They drunk water while she was cooking. I heard them say they would get whooped if they sot around with a book in their hand. When company would come they would turn the pot down and close the shutters and doors. They had preaching and prayed that way. The pot was to ...
— Slave Narratives: A Folk History of Slavery in the United States from Interviews with Former Slaves, Arkansas Narratives, Part 4 • Works Projects Administration

... style?" she returned laughing. "I don't think you could here. Mrs. Jevons would turn me out as not being respectable; not even being Mrs. ...
— Five Nights • Victoria Cross

... the operation of the law. Discriminations were commonly practiced and hidden away in accounts under false or misleading headings. Rebates were given and received, a fact which was due in no small degree to the shippers themselves. A large shipper might demand advantageous rates and threaten to turn his trade over to a rival road. As the arrangement would be secret, and the likelihood of discovery small, the temptation to break the law ...
— The United States Since The Civil War • Charles Ramsdell Lingley

... wounded on each side, and 1000 Americans, including both generals, were taken captive. A more favourable result for the Americans was not to be expected, as the British outnumbered them four to one, and could therefore march where they pleased and turn the American flank without incurring the slightest risk. The wonder is, not that 5000 half-trained soldiers were defeated by 20,000 veterans, but that they should have given General Howe a good ...
— The War of Independence • John Fiske

... XV. sowed the seeds of the French Revolution. Two dissolute women, notorious on the page of history, each, in their turn, governed him and France. The Marchioness du Pompadour was his first favorite. Ambitious, shrewd, unprincipled, and avaricious, she held the weak-minded king entirely under her control, and spread throughout the court ...
— Maria Antoinette - Makers of History • John S. C. (John Stevens Cabot) Abbott

... torture in the Barcelona Castle) and the United States (the execution of five Chicago Anarchists in 1887). Against these prosecutions the Anarchists retaliated by acts of violence which in their turn were followed by more executions from above, and new acts of revenge from below. This created in the general public the impression that violence is the substance of Anarchism, a view repudiated by its supporters, who hold that in ...
— Project Gutenberg Encyclopedia

... speculative turn," writes Teufelsdrockh, "there come seasons, meditative, sweet, yet awful hours, when in wonder and fear you ask yourself that unanswerable question: Who am I; the thing that can say 'I' (das Wesen das sich ICH nennt)? The world, with its loud trafficking, ...
— Sartor Resartus - The Life and Opinions of Herr Teufelsdrockh • Thomas Carlyle

... very fond of shops, she said, and it would take far too long to see them all. But she went to the end of that street with him, and then back again down the opposite side, and then he begged her to turn down the other street they had crossed on their way to the confectioner's, and they had gone quite to the end of it, Baby staring in at all the shop windows in a way that really made Lisa smile, for he looked so grave ...
— The Adventures of Herr Baby • Mrs. Molesworth

... hymns, to the accompaniment of the band, were sung heartily. At the close, the Corps Commander and staff went round to each battalion, and those who had won honours came forward to receive them. As the officers and men stood in turn before the General, the A.D.C. read out a short account of what each had done to win the decoration. It was deeply moving to hear the acts of gallantry that had been performed. Fixed and motionless each man would stand, while we ...
— The Great War As I Saw It • Frederick George Scott

... curse not? Pray for your father, then, I repeat, that he incur not the malediction he has announced on you; since he has broken, as you see, a command truly divine; while you, by obeying that other precept which enjoins us to pray for them that persecute and curse us, will turn ...
— Clarissa, Volume 3 (of 9) • Samuel Richardson

... in search of specimens for his collection of birds. His attention was suddenly roused by the roaring of the flames as they swept down the sides of the hills, wrapping them in a sheet of fire. The predicament in which he was placed was a most critical one, as he hardly knew which way to turn to avoid the pressing danger. Even when, fortunately, he had taken the right direction, it was with the greatest exertion that he burst through the matted thicket and reached the ...
— Discoveries in Australia, Volume 1. • J Lort Stokes

... They would turn treacherously upon the unarmed crowd when absorbed in the interest of buying and selling; robbing and killing the old men, they would make prisoners of the young and strong, the women and children, carrying them ...
— History Of Egypt, Chaldaea, Syria, Babylonia, and Assyria, Volume 4 (of 12) • G. Maspero

... on a curious sort of helmet, made of brass, with a kind of horn standing out from the crown; others wore a wadding of woollen stuff, a sort of thin mattrass, in imitation of a coat of mail. Its object is to turn the points of the poisoned arrows. The cavaliers thus dressed form the body-guard of the Sarkee. Amongst these troops were some Bornou horsemen, who rode with more skill than the Zinder people. The best cavaliers ...
— Narrative of a Mission to Central Africa Performed in the Years 1850-51, Volume 2 • James Richardson

... exhibited in the engraving is to allow the teeth of a cultivator to turn slightly and avoid obstructions, while they will follow at all times the line of draft, so that in turning the cultivator there is no risk of breaking the teeth or their shanks, or of overturning the implement. The cultivator blade, A, may be of any desired form, and it is secured to the ...
— Scientific American, Vol. 17, No. 26 December 28, 1867 • Various

... seen him so wearied, or so vexed, I know not which. "How shall I rejoice," he cried, "when all this is over, and I can turn my back ...
— The Diary and Letters of Madam D'Arblay Volume 2 • Madame D'Arblay

... revolution was the only remedy for the wrongs of Ireland, and as her connection with England prevented revolution, therefore it was the duty of England to effect by policy what revolution would effect by force, and as he had defended the Chartist petition, so in turn, when the Eastern Question came up, he defended Turkey; in all this making it supremely plain that he never was the one to truckle to rank or authority. He was the head of the small party of Young Englanders; ...
— Great Men and Famous Women. Vol. 4 of 8 • Various

... but it is one to which I am led, neither by my abilities nor my turn of mind. Independently, then, of the difficulties of the subject, and the necessity, before forming an opinion, of knowing more of the arguments of theologians upon it than I do, I am very unwilling to say a word here on the subject of Lying and Equivocation. But I consider ...
— Apologia Pro Vita Sua • John Henry Cardinal Newman

... lost its force. With ancient bards, an invocation Was a true act of adoration, Of worship an essential part, And not a formal piece of art, Of paltry reading a parade, A dull solemnity in trade, A pious fever, taught to burn An hour or two, to serve a turn. 20 They talk'd not of Castalian springs, By way of saying pretty things, As we dress out our flimsy rhymes; 'T was the religion of the times; And they believed that holy stream With greater force made Fancy teem, Reckon'd by all a true specific To make the barren ...
— Poetical Works • Charles Churchill

... elements of delicious pride, and more delicious humility. To offend the love of such a woman was wrong, but it might be forgiven; to desert her was unmanly, but he might have returned, and wiped for ever from her eyes the tears of her desertion: but to injure and to desert, and then to turn back and wound her widowed privacy with unhallowed strains of cold-blooded mockery, was brutally, fiendishly, inexpiably mean. For impurities there might be some possibility of pardon, were they supposed to spring only from the reckless buoyancy of young blood and fiery passions; ...
— Lady Byron Vindicated • Harriet Beecher Stowe

... substantiate the polarization theory. There was no sudden obliteration of the disk by a horizon. Rather the sun faded away, redder and duller; then slowly losing form and so becoming a mere blur of crimson, which in turn grew purple and so ...
— Darkness and Dawn • George Allan England

... to the housekeeper's lips was checked by the return of Madame de Fondege, followed by a servant-girl with a turn-up nose, a pert manner, and who carried a lighted ...
— Baron Trigault's Vengeance - Volume 2 (of 2) • Emile Gaboriau

... her turn in that constant tramp, tramp across the floor, and at last, when the happy moment came, if it ever did come, in which both babies were worn out with crying and were laid asleep beside her mother, Poppy would ...
— Poppy's Presents • Mrs O. F. Walton

... at the door, Austin flew to open it, and admitted Mr. Pitt, the governor, a tall pompous personage, who, in his turn, ushered in four other individuals. The first of these, whom he addressed as Mr. Gay, was a stout, good-looking, good-humoured man, about thirty-six, with a dark complexion, an oval face, fine black eyes, full of ...
— Jack Sheppard - A Romance • William Harrison Ainsworth

... Sunday, and all at church except my darling Una who keeps watch over her mother. These Sundays when I have had them each alone in turn have been blessed days to them and to me. Surely this is some compensation for what they lose in me of health and vigor. I know the state of each soul as far as it can be known, and have every reason to believe that my children all love my Saviour ...
— Stepping Heavenward • Mrs. E. Prentiss

... Tommy plunged sideways from the rail, making a complete turn in the air, landing in the ...
— The Meadow-Brook Girls Afloat • Janet Aldridge

... and ample supply of muskets. The Iroquois was bravest as the wolf is bravest—when attacking a lamb. Three hundred Hurons lay in ambush along the forest trail. These ran from the Iroquois like sheep; but when three hundred more sallied from the fort, led by the French, it was the Iroquois' turn to run, and they fled back behind the palisades of St. Louis. The Hurons followed, entered by the selfsame breaches the Iroquois had made, and drove the invaders out. More Iroquois rushed from Ignace to the rescue. ...
— Canada: the Empire of the North - Being the Romantic Story of the New Dominion's Growth from Colony to Kingdom • Agnes C. Laut

... is wrung by what I have heard to-night; but I beg of you, as a last favor, do not, oh, do not turn away from God! Inez, there is a God; and death is not an everlasting sleep. Hereafter is an awful tribunal; and if not again on earth, you and I shall assuredly meet before God. Oh I believe that he will yet bless you; that he will enable you to bear all earthly trials; and, ...
— Inez - A Tale of the Alamo • Augusta J. Evans

... the war between Pyrrhus and Demetrius was protracted for many years, with varying success, one party being sometimes triumphant, and sometimes the other. At last, at a time when the tide of fortune seemed inclined to turn against Pyrrhus, some circumstances occurred which were the means of attracting his attention strongly in another direction, and ended in introducing him to a new and very brilliant career in an altogether different region. These circumstances, and the train of events to which they led, will ...
— Pyrrhus - Makers of History • Jacob Abbott

... been handed down to us by St. Matthew, will be found, as it has been now explained, to coincide in its object with that which was given to Paul, as we find by his confession to Agrippa. For he declared[173] he was sent as a minister to the Gentiles "to open their eyes, and to turn them from darkness to light, and from the power of Satan unto God, that they might receive forgiveness of sins, and inheritance among them which are sanctified by faith in Christ." But what was this, the Quakers say, but to baptize them into ...
— A Portraiture of Quakerism, Volume II (of 3) • Thomas Clarkson

... woman, or of a man accompanied by one of his female relatives, calls for especial punishment. The presence of a woman protects her husband from violence by a creditor, and in general imposes peace and decorum.[1586] As a mark of respect for a man with whom she is talking, a Tuareg woman will turn her back to him, or draw a fold of her garment over her mouth.[1587] The Kalmucks consider that a man without his girdle is in extreme undress. He never shows himself before old people without ...
— Folkways - A Study of the Sociological Importance of Usages, Manners, Customs, Mores, and Morals • William Graham Sumner

... the dancers whose morris-bells ringing Sound the death-knell of our years. We are the harpers who turn into singing Our hopes and our foves and our fears. Thine is the tribute wrung hard from our anguish After the death blows are struck. We are thy bondmen who jest while we languish,— We are thy souls, ...
— Masters of the Guild • L. Lamprey

... their comrades, it should be stated that, from the contour of the ground, the Rough Riders were so much in advance of the Tenth Cavalry that, to reach the latter regiment from the former, one had really to go straight to the rear and then turn sharply to the right; and further, it is a well known fact, that in this country most persons of color feel out of place when they are by force compelled to mingle with white persons, especially strangers, and although we knew we were doing our duty, and would ...
— History of Negro Soldiers in the Spanish-American War, and Other Items of Interest • Edward A. Johnson

... of words and formulas. Handled with art, they possess in sober truth the mysterious power formerly attributed to them by the adepts of magic. They cause the birth in the minds of crowds of the most formidable tempests, which in turn they are capable of stilling. A pyramid far loftier than that of old Cheops could be raised merely with the bones of men who have been victims of the power ...
— The Crowd • Gustave le Bon

... very curious, very artificial, and not worth while to analyse at length: I leave it to the reader. But before I turn my back on Shakespeare, I should like to quote a passage, for my own pleasure, and for a very ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 16 (of 25) • Robert Louis Stevenson

... you'll be a sight wuss off it you leave it wheer 't is, now you knaw. Theer'll be hell to pay if it's let bide now, sure as eggs is eggs an' winter, winter. You'll rue it; you'll gnash awver it; 't will turn against 'e an' rot the root an' blight the ear an' starve the things an' break your heart. Mark me, you'm doin' a cutthroat deed an' killin' all your awn luck by leavin' it here ...
— Children of the Mist • Eden Phillpotts

... perhaps your stomach will turn against the food I cooked with these hands," he added suddenly, stretching out his hands towards ...
— "Fin Tireur" - 1905 • Robert Hichens

... curious speciment there; a tall thin feller, with one o' them lean, chinny faces. He claimed 'at he had been a show actor, but his lungs had given out—claimed he was a tragudian, but Great Scott! he couldn't even turn a handspring. ...
— Happy Hawkins • Robert Alexander Wason

... terminate at Philadelphia or New York. It reaches across the ocean and ends in London, the center of the credit system. The same laws of trade which give to the banks in our principal cities power over the whole banking system of the United States subject the former, in their turn, to the money power in Great Britain. It is not denied that the suspension of the New York banks in 1837, which was followed in quick succession throughout the Union, was produced by an application of that ...
— State of the Union Addresses of Martin van Buren • Martin van Buren

... rather vexed and annoyed at Miss Matty's conduct in taking the note to herself so decidedly. I had so set my heart upon her having a new silk gown, which she wanted sadly; in general she was so undecided anybody might turn her round; in this case I had felt that it was no use attempting it, but I was not the less ...
— Cranford • Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell

... alone are the author of this unconstitutional assemblage; it is you alone who have led away these worthy people. You are a rascal!"—"The tone of these honest citizens in addressing the sieur Santerre made him turn pale. But, encouraged by a glance from the sieur Legendre, he resorted to a hypocritical subterfuge, and addressing the troop, he said: 'Gentlemen, draw up a report, officially stating that I refuse to enter the king's ...
— The Origins of Contemporary France, Volume 3 (of 6) - The French Revolution, Volume 2 (of 3) • Hippolyte A. Taine

... have been worse? And of course she would have hysteria and then turn on me and blame me for it all. It all came over me at once and overwhelmed me, while Anne was crying and saying she wouldn't cook if she starved for it, and Aunt Selina was taking off her wraps. I felt queer all over, and I sat down suddenly. Mr. ...
— When a Man Marries • Mary Roberts Rinehart

... other nation ever did. In order to understand this thoroughly, we must remember that for ages they, as a people, have been oppressed and held in bondage by a stern and powerful nation. They had to defend themselves in turn against the most open and the most insidious attacks. Bereft in many cases of all the means of defence, they had nothing left them, save their religion, and the support they ...
— Irish Race in the Past and the Present • Aug. J. Thebaud

... Reformers; and Reformers' wives were among the first to nurse the wounded. President Kruger came over to Johannesburg to visit the scene of the accident. He visited the wounded at the Wanderers' and hospital, and seemed greatly affected. He made a speech in which he begged the sufferers to turn their eyes to the Great Healer, who alone could comfort. He also said that he was gratified to hear that the subscriptions in aid of the distressed had reached so high a figure; 'Johannesburg had come nobly to the rescue, and he was glad to know it.' ...
— A Woman's Part in a Revolution • Natalie Harris Hammond

... fortnight in the Portobello Barracks we crossed to England and pitched our camp at Basingstoke. Here we had two or three months' divisional training. The whole of the Xth Division—about 25,000 men—used to turn ...
— At Suvla Bay • John Hargrave

... keys and those which are between the working parts of the action become compressed or worn so that the jack will be found to set so low that there will be lost motion in the key. In this case, loosen one of the screws in the bottom and turn the other down so as to move the jack upward until nearly all lost motion is taken up. A little play is generally necessary, but very little. In case the action has a capstan, simply turn ...
— Piano Tuning - A Simple and Accurate Method for Amateurs • J. Cree Fischer

... booming in with the heavy impetus of high tide, flinging long streamers of kelp and bits of driftwood over the narrowing stretch of sand where garishly costumed bathers had lately shrieked hilariously at their gambols. Before the chill wind that had risen with the turn of the tide the bathers retreated in dripping, shivering groups, to appear later in fluffs and furs and woollen sweaters; still inclined to hilarity, still undeniably both to leave off their pleasuring at Venice, ...
— The Lookout Man • B. M. Bower

... all the corn afforded to her, which was not much, and in a few minutes more Mr. Dale resumed his journey. He had performed about three miles, when the sound of wheels behind him made him turn his head; and he perceived a chaise driven very fast, while out of the windows thereof dangled strangely a pair of human legs. The pad began to curvet as the post-horses rattled behind, and the parson had only an indistinct vision of a human ...
— My Novel, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... feeling unites all in a common bond. There are poured into this community the hopes, aspirations, habits, and tastes of the different students, which are soon molded into a common life, and become, in turn, an important factor in forming the character and directing the life of ...
— Colleges in America • John Marshall Barker

... who in turn followed Tom who walked some ten feet ahead. A light breeze sprang up and blew across the surface of the powdery sand. Ten minutes later, when they stopped to adjust their shoulder packs, they looked back. The breeze had obliterated their tracks and the ...
— Stand by for Mars! • Carey Rockwell

... on the porch with a sinking heart. In the dimly lighted hall Mr. Moseley and Mr. Meech kept silent watch, their faces grave with apprehension. Without stopping to speak to them, Sandy hurried to the door of the judge's room. Before he could turn the knob, Dr. Fenton opened it softly and, putting his finger on his lips, came out, cautiously closing the door ...
— Sandy • Alice Hegan Rice

... turned it into delicate cups with just the right quantity of cream and sugar, so that it was just the right colour that coffee should be. The steak was tender and juicy, the baked potatoes done to a turn, and yet there was a slight cloud hanging over that table that did not ...
— Divers Women • Pansy and Mrs. C.M. Livingston

... mind must remember. The stag has legs to be tucked away for sleep, and untucked for movement; and the bird has wings that must be folded and pecked and cared for. But the fish has but one piece from his nose to his tail. He is complete, single and unencumbered. He turns in one turn, and goes up and down and ...
— Irish Fairy Tales • James Stephens

... strange—in youth all action and all life, Burning for pleasure, not averse from strife; Woman—the Field—the Ocean, all that gave Promise of gladness, peril of a grave, In turn he tried—he ransacked all below, And found his recompense in joy or woe, 120 No tame, trite medium; for his feelings sought In that intenseness an escape from thought:[ji] The Tempest of his Heart in scorn had gazed On that the feebler Elements hath raised; The Rapture of his Heart had looked ...
— The Works Of Lord Byron, Vol. 3 (of 7) • Lord Byron

... of our ship—the tide was exceeding low and the dock high; having been embraced in turn by friends who had soaked for an hour and a half on that desolate pier-head—for our ship was belated, groping her way in the fog,—we were taken by the hand and led cautiously into the sand-fields that lie between ...
— In the Footprints of the Padres • Charles Warren Stoddard

... inevitable black "boy" were to be with us on this preliminary walk-about; but all hands were to turn out for the muster, ...
— We of the Never-Never • Jeanie "Mrs. Aeneas" Gunn

... lost friends and ship by the common chances of the sea," he said, "surely you have found both anew. You shall turn viking and go on this raid with us. Glad shall we be of your axe play ...
— Wulfric the Weapon Thane • Charles W. Whistler

... single one of my brethren has done so." "I am sure I have not," said Crewe of Durham. "Nor I," said Cartwright of Chester. Crewe and Cartwright might well be believed; for both had sate in the Ecclesiastical Commission. When Compton's turn came, he parried the question with an adroitness which a Jesuit might have envied. "I gave your Majesty ...
— The History of England from the Accession of James II. - Volume 2 (of 5) • Thomas Babington Macaulay

... A sudden turn of the road brought them in full sight of the village, sheltered on the east side by low green hills; and beyond the village, at some distance, a broad belt of wood, the hills on one hand and green meadowland on the other. Five ...
— Fan • Henry Harford

... indelible, and added, "Besides, if I am as I am, it's my own choosing. To begin with, I have no teeth. The major said to me a long time ago, 'You haven't a single tooth. It's not enough. At your next rest,' he says, 'take a turn round to ...
— Under Fire - The Story of a Squad • Henri Barbusse

... wish to see his family and chief; nor did he like the idea of being landed at Moo-dee When-u-a, as, notwithstanding what he had heard respecting the good understanding there was between his district and that of Moo-dee When-u-a, the information might turn out to be not strictly true. Nothing more was said about it; and it was my intention to land them nearer to their homes, if it could be done in the course of the day, although it was then a perfect calm. Soon after the chief came on board they told me with tears ...
— An Account of the English Colony in New South Wales, Vol. 1 • David Collins

... shamefacedly made her way to the nearest exit, and got him out through the Sunday-school room. She would take him home through a side street, feed him and send him away as soon as possible. It was a horrible ordeal, but Miss Mink was not one to turn back once she had faced a difficult situation. As they passed down the broad steps into the brilliant October sunshine, she noticed with relief that his shoes were not muddy. Then, before she could make other observations, her mind was entirely preoccupied with a large, firm hand ...
— Miss Mink's Soldier and Other Stories • Alice Hegan Rice

... of me, one favour more I pray: * Unto the convents[FN180] find more your way: Turn me that so I face the land of Hind; * Then go, and fairest greetings for ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 5 • Richard F. Burton

... believe for one moment that Random is in danger," said Archie, "and, if he is, I shall turn detective myself." ...
— The Green Mummy • Fergus Hume

... thrusts. You have an appetite. You are the nation which eats other nations—a magnificent function! This suction of the world makes England preeminent. As politicians and philosophers, in the management of colonies, populations, and industry, and in the desire to do others any harm which may turn to your own good, you stand alone. The hour will come when two boards will be put up on earth—inscribed on one side, Men; on the other, Englishmen. I mention this to your glory, I, who am neither English ...
— The Man Who Laughs • Victor Hugo

... Jesus silently and unresistingly follows Pilate from the hall, still wearing the mockery of royal pomp. Pilate had calculated that the sight of Him in such guise, and bleeding from the lash, might turn hate into contempt, and perhaps give a touch of pity. 'Behold the man!' as he meant it, was as if he had said, 'Is this poor, bruised, spiritless sufferer worth hate or fear? Does He look like a King or a dangerous enemy?' Pilate for once drops the scoff of calling ...
— Expositions of Holy Scripture: St. John Chaps. XV to XXI • Alexander Maclaren

... 1741 did not deter farmers from the culture of the potato; on the contrary, it increased rapidly after that period, and we now find it, for the first time, recognised as a rotation crop. They preferred to turn their attention to improve its quality and productiveness, and to take measures for its protection from frost, rather than to abandon its culture. And, indeed, it was as much a matter of necessity as choice that they did ...
— The History of the Great Irish Famine of 1847 (3rd ed.) (1902) - With Notices Of Earlier Irish Famines • John O'Rourke

... would start in pursuit, and playful scrimmages would ensue, the hilarious uproar of which would turn poor Mrs. ...
— Young Lives • Richard Le Gallienne

... Turn upon her friend at any rate Miriam does; and one of my main points is missed if it fails to appear that she does so with absolute sincerity and with the cold passion of the high critic who knows, on sight of them together, the more or less dazzling ...
— The Tragic Muse • Henry James

... Browne, "I am ready for almost any thing in the way of the marvellous, since having seen a solid and substantial-looking island turn into a vapour, and vanish away before my very eyes. I shall be careful about doubting any thing, until I get back to some Christian country, where things go on regularly. For the present, I am in state of mind to believe in phoenixes and unicorns—and why not in oyster-trees? Who knows ...
— The Island Home • Richard Archer

... I think the fellows had better turn in, and sleep till we return," I suggested. "There will be time enough then to load the scow, and reach the island ...
— Breaking Away - or The Fortunes of a Student • Oliver Optic

... under this discipline. His hair was just beginning to be touched with silver, and his expression was that of habitual sadness and anxiety. He had no counsellor, as we have seen, to turn to, who did not know either too much or too little. He had no heart to rest upon and into which he might unburden himself of the secrets and the sorrows that were aching in his own breast. Yet he had not allowed himself to run ...
— Elsie Venner • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.

... faces stand out in a crowd, men you turn to look after on the street. Such—quite apart from his sprightly past—was Christopher Foy, who now entered with Creagan. He was about thirty, above middle height, every mold and line of him slender and fine and strong. His face was resolute, ...
— The Desire of the Moth; and The Come On • Eugene Manlove Rhodes

... his "having come to New York a stranger some years ago, and finding the state in possession of two rich families," &c. What absurdity! But, shrinking from these disgusting and revolting exposures, the reader, it is believed, will cheerfully turn to the perusal of those letters which again presents to his view Colonel Burr in the domestic and social scenes ...
— Memoirs of Aaron Burr, Complete • Matthew L. Davis

... wisely," Charlie said. "I must have a cook, for Tim Kelly here is not famous that way; and although he might manage for me, when alone, he certainly could not turn out a dinner which would be suitable, when I have some of the rajah's kinsmen and officers dining with me. Did I get another cook, he might be just as open to the offers of my enemies as Hossein has been; and do you not think that, after ...
— With Clive in India - Or, The Beginnings of an Empire • G. A. Henty

... classes within it. In every nation, since the dawn of history, there have been found, beside the toiling masses, three great main cliques or classes, the Religious, the Military, and the Commercial. It was so in far-back ancient India; it is so now. Each of these classes endeavours in its turn—as one might expect—to become the ruling class and to run the government of the nation. The governments of the nations thus become class-governments. And it is one or another of these classes that for reasons of its own, alone or in ...
— The Healing of Nations and the Hidden Sources of Their Strife • Edward Carpenter

... Angelo), and sail home to Ithaca, he was carried out to sea by the winds, beyond the Island Cythera, across the main toward the coast of Africa. Thus he is swept outside the boundaries of Hellas proper into a region dimly known, half-mythical; he cannot make the sharp turn at Maleia, inside the Greek world; he must go beyond it and there reach his final experience. Not simply physical is this description, else it would be a mere statement in geography; it is also spiritual and hence rises ...
— Homer's Odyssey - A Commentary • Denton J. Snider

... recognition could be pleasant that was at all likely to detain him; still less a recognition by Tessa. And it was unmistakably Tessa whom he had caught sight of moving along, with a timid and forlorn look, towards that very turn of the Lung' Arno which he was just rounding. As he continued his talk with the young Dovizi, he had an uncomfortable undercurrent of consciousness which told him that Tessa had seen him and would certainly follow him: there was no escaping her along this ...
— Romola • George Eliot

... the material side of the question. "Will the love that we are rich in, light the fire in the kitchen, and the little god of love turn the spit O!" What had they to live on? He was a young man, and his income was very small; it takes many years in Germany to make a career as engineer, unless you are exceptionally lucky ...
— Fairy Tales from the German Forests • Margaret Arndt

... place in a saucepan. Add boiling water and let it simper two hours. Season with a pinch of salt, and if this is not satisfactory, you might also pinch a little pepper. Put the bark in the coffee grinder and turn the handle rapidly to the left. Add boiling water and serve with milk and sugar. This will be a splendid joke on the Coffee Trust. The mock pork pie is now done. Serve with lionaise dressing and tomato catsup. After dinner ...
— The Silly Syclopedia • Noah Lott

... Gerrard and scolded him harshly for not keeping steady while waiting at the door of the berth. At length the master-at-arms came round, the midshipmen were sent to their hammocks, and Paul Gerrard was allowed to turn into his. He felt very sick and very miserable. It was the commencement of his sea life, a life for which he had long and enthusiastically yearned, and this was what it proved to be. How different the reality from what he had expected! He could have cried aloud ...
— Paul Gerrard - The Cabin Boy • W.H.G. Kingston

... elapsed. One of the most impressive features of the effect of New York—meaning by "New York" only that small but significant portion of the four millions that thinks—at least, after a fashion, and acts, instead of being mere passive tools of whatever happens to turn up—the most familiar notable effect of this New York is the speedy distinction in the newcomer of those illusions and delusions about life and about human nature, about good and evil, that are for so many people the most precious and the only ...
— Susan Lenox: Her Fall and Rise • David Graham Phillips

... flower is made up only of those two things—salts from the soil, and water from the sky. Most wonderful! But so it is. Water is made up of several very different things. The leaves and flowers, when they drink up water, keep certain parts of water, and turn them into wood; and the part of the water which they do not want, is just the part which we do want, namely, fresh air, for water is full of fresh air. And therefore the plants breathe out the fresh air through their leaves, that we may breathe it into our lungs. More and more wonders, ...
— True Words for Brave Men • Charles Kingsley

... great Finn said, As he turn’d his face towards his clan; Then his face with rage grey fiery red, And he struck with his fist ...
— King Hacon's Death and Bran and the Black Dog - two ballads - - - Translator: George Borrow • Thomas J. Wise

... am surprised Bentley did not turn the point of his antagonist's sword on himself, for this flourish was a most unguarded one. But Bentley could not then know so much of the book, "made ...
— Calamities and Quarrels of Authors • Isaac D'Israeli

... something like a show of resistance." Taken with the fancy, the robber good-naturedly complied with the request; but hardly had the smoke from the weapons cleared away, when the tailor pulled out a rusty old horse pistol, and in turn politely requested the highwayman to shell out everything of value about him—his pistols not excepted. So the highwayman had the worst of the meeting on that occasion. The incident will perhaps help to dispel the sad reproach of the craft, that a tailor ...
— A Hundred Years by Post - A Jubilee Retrospect • J. Wilson Hyde

... now the gallant: and they say the King himself did once ask Montagu how his mistress (meaning the Queene) did. He grew so proud, and despised every body, besides suffering nobody, he or she, to get or do any thing about the Queene, that they all laboured to do him a good turn. They also say that he did give some affront to the Duke of Monmouth, which the King himself did speak to him of. But strange it is that this man should, from the greatest negligence in the world, come to be the miracle of attendance, so as to take all ...
— Diary of Samuel Pepys, Complete • Samuel Pepys

... busy little creature within me, whom we call self, was digging pits for comfort to flow in, of any kind, in any form; and it seized on every idea, every circumstance, to turn it to that purpose, and with such success, that when by-and-by I learnt how entirely inactive special Providence had been in my affairs, I had to collect myself before I could muster the conception of gratitude toward the noble woman who clothed ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... you can come back safely. I have plenty more hot water, and I could have scalded the whole of you as badly as those in front had I wanted to. Now I promise, on my oath, not to turn it on again if you will come and carry off your mates who are here. Take them off home as quick as you can, before the soldiers come. I don't want to do you harm. You'd all best be in bed as soon ...
— Facing Death - The Hero of the Vaughan Pit. A Tale of the Coal Mines • G. A. Henty

... So far, they've turned out badly. I'm involved in a heavy outlay. At first the affair seemed certain. It may turn out all right now, I don't know, but I tell you I'm neck deep—neck deep. I can hold on for a year or so, and you must get Naomi's money, or I'm ...
— The Birthright • Joseph Hocking

... you showed me was an entry of wools?- Yes. They would be to sell the worsted once they had spun it, but they can turn it ...
— Second Shetland Truck System Report • William Guthrie

... If we turn to the accounts given by the Mohammedan conquerors of India, we find Idrisi, in his Geography (written in the eleventh century), summing up their opinion of the ...
— India: What can it teach us? - A Course of Lectures Delivered before the University Of Cambridge • F. Max Mueller

... that the numbers would not turn up, I should feel perfectly secure, and could realize on the bonds at any time," he thought. "I will wait awhile, and I may see ...
— Struggling Upward - or Luke Larkin's Luck • Horatio Alger

... alter my opinion. In fact, I do not regret the old regime,—though I have had some agreeable times under it. But never tell me the Revolution is going to establish equality, because men will never be equal; it is an impossibility, and, let them turn the country upside down to their heart's content, there will still be great and small, fat and lean ...
— The Gods are Athirst • Anatole France

... Basset wouldst thou go, Fro' the place where thou dost stand? The next pair of gallows thou comest unto, Turn in upon ...
— The Book of Brave Old Ballads • Unknown

... We could not well turn back. We thought we should surely come to water, sooner than we could get back to the river we had left; and with this hope we struggled on. Late in the afternoon, our eyes were greeted by a glad sight, that caused us to start up in our saddles with a feeling of joy. You may think ...
— The Desert Home - The Adventures of a Lost Family in the Wilderness • Mayne Reid

... When his span is at an end, he goes back to that from which he sprang. Thus it is that in the hour of bitter trial and exhaustion, there is no man but calls to God, just as in his hours of sickness and sorrow every one of us will turn ...
— Religions of Ancient China • Herbert A. Giles

... Frida would read out of her brown Bible to Elsie about Jesus, His life and His atoning death. And sometimes in the evening, when Hans would sit cutting out various kinds of toys, for which he had a great turn, and could easily dispose of them in the shops at Dringenstadt, she would read to him also; and he loved to hear the Old Testament stories of Moses and Jacob, Joseph, and Daniel in the lion's den; also of David, the sweet psalmist of Israel, who had once been a ...
— Little Frida - A Tale of the Black Forest • Anonymous

... secluded cove, in which the sea-maids once had played, no doubt, Marjory and Coleman sat in silence. He was below her, and if he looked at her he had to turn his glance obliquely upward. She was staring at the sea with woman's mystic gaze, a gaze which men at once reverence and fear since it seems to look into the deep, simple heart of nature, and men begin to feel that their petty wisdoms ...
— Active Service • Stephen Crane

... propping himself on his elbow. He looked wildly and fixedly for some time on his daughter, as though not recognising her. He had never seen her before in such attire. Suddenly he recognised her, crushed and ashamed in her humiliation and gaudy finery, meekly awaiting her turn to say good-bye to her dying father. His face ...
— Crime and Punishment • Fyodor Dostoyevsky



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