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noun
Writer  n.  
1.
One who writes, or has written; a scribe; a clerk. "They (came) that handle the pen of the writer." "My tongue is the pen of a ready writer."
2.
One who is engaged in literary composition as a profession; an author; as, a writer of novels. "This pitch, as ancient writers do report, doth defile."
3.
A clerk of a certain rank in the service of the late East India Company, who, after serving a certain number of years, became a factor.
Writer of the tallies (Eng. Law), an officer of the exchequer of England, who acted as clerk to the auditor of the receipt, and wrote the accounts upon the tallies from the tellers' bills. The use of tallies in the exchequer has been abolished.
Writer's cramp, Writer's palsy or Writer's spasm (Med.), a painful spasmodic affection of the muscles of the fingers, brought on by excessive use, as in writing, violin playing, telegraphing, etc. Called also scrivener's palsy.
Writer to the signet. See under Signet.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Writer" Quotes from Famous Books



... should swear to the observance of it, which he, ignorant of the contents, was induced to do. But besides that this story is not very likely in itself, and savours of monkish fiction, it is found in no other ancient writer, and is contradicted by some of them, particularly the monk of Marmoutier, who had better opportunities than Newbridge of knowing the truth. See Vita ...
— The History of England, Volume I • David Hume

... his stories of the Red Branch rescued from the past what was contemporary to the best in us to-day, and he was equal in his gifts as a writer to the greatest of his bardic predecessors in Ireland. His sentences are charged with a heroic energy, and, when he is telling a great tale, their rise and fall are like the flashing and falling of the bright sword of some great champion in battle, or the onset and withdrawal of Atlantic ...
— The Coming of Cuculain • Standish O'Grady

... because you are good and loyal to a poor writer," he answered, with a break to humble appreciation of her bounty and her bravery. "Be patient with me," he pleaded. "Enid will recoup you for all you have suffered. It will win back all your funds. I have made it ...
— The Light of the Star - A Novel • Hamlin Garland

... wondered what a writer of fiction would have made out of such a story. As a matter of fact, the woman is living to-day, highly respected, serenely proud of her two grown daughters; and I believe William simply covered up her sin so deep with his wisdom that she has forgotten it. His ...
— A Circuit Rider's Wife • Corra Harris

... more than I know what to do with. Shall I write for the stage? I could as easily write a cook book. Do I give my autograph? Always, if a stamped envelope is enclosed. One of our hardest-working presidents daily set apart a time for autographs; why then should a popular writer pretend that it bores him? He is secretly tickled, ...
— The Henchman • Mark Lee Luther

... the writer of the article on the Cliff Dwellers in last Sunday's Republican makes the statement that they apparently had neither literature nor religion. He bases his assertions on the fact that he does not find altars or writings among their possessions. But appearances are against him. They apparently ...
— How to Become Rich - A Treatise on Phrenology, Choice of Professions and Matrimony • William Windsor

... said to have lived 850 years before the Christian era, consequently about 200 years after King David. He lived in Boeotia, where his tomb is still shown at Orchomenus. This ancient writer left behind him two great poems, one entitled "The Works and Days," in which he gives us some of the earliest Greek legends, and the other, "The Theogony," containing the genealogies of the gods; but, unfortunately, both these poems have been so interpolated ...
— Myths and Legends of Ancient Greece and Rome • E.M. Berens

... David! Smile with the simple;—What folly is that? And who would feed with the poor that can help it? No, no; let me smile with the wise, and feed with the rich.' I repeated this sally to Garrick, and wondered to find his sensibility as a writer not a little irritated by it. To sooth him, I observed, that Johnson spared none of us; and I quoted the passage in Horace[232], in which he compares one who attacks his friends for the sake of a laugh, to a pushing ox[233], that is marked by a bunch of ...
— Life Of Johnson, Vol. 2 • Boswell

... November 7th dawned, a dispatch, embracing the most important features of the Sunday night meeting, had been prepared by the writer, and forwarded to the commandant of Camp Douglas, who, during the night, arrested Judge Morris, Brig.-Gen. Charles Walsh, and others, and a large number of "butternuts," who had been the subject of discussion at the Sunday night meeting, and these ...
— The Great North-Western Conspiracy In All Its Startling Details • I. Windslow Ayer

... above the rest, to whom the final success can be attributed. Rome won simply through the better fighting qualities of her rank and file and the stamina of her citizens. To quote the phrase of a British writer,[1] Rome showed the superior "fitness ...
— A History of Sea Power • William Oliver Stevens and Allan Westcott

... General Sir Henry Johnson, who was defeated and captured by General Anthony Wayne at Stony Point. Rebecca Franks was one of the most beautiful and brilliant women of her day. Well educated, a gifted writer and fascinating conversationalist, witty and winsome, she was popular in society and one of the belles of the celebrated "Mischianza", which was given May 18, 1778, by the British officers in honor of General Lord Howe upon his departure ...
— The Colonial Architecture of Philadelphia • Frank Cousins

... And an English writer, with English notions of the liberty of the press, would hardly have thought it worth while to notice such an affair at all, did he not feel bound to submit his judgment to that of the French themselves. And if their view be correct, almost ...
— The Life of Marie Antoinette, Queen of France • Charles Duke Yonge

... so much, my lord, that the writer told me to assure you that the matter was urgent, and that he could not be mistaken as to what was ...
— At Agincourt • G. A. Henty

... writer says: "The cabbage comes into use when other things begin to fail, and it is by far the best succulent vegetable for milking cows,—keeping up the yield of milk, and preserving, better than any other food, some portion of the quality ...
— Cabbages and Cauliflowers: How to Grow Them • James John Howard Gregory

... founded on fact, to use the common phrase. It is not the history of any individual mind among the recent converts to the Catholic Church. The principal characters are imaginary; and the writer wishes to disclaim personal allusion in any. It is with this view that he has feigned ecclesiastical bodies and places, to avoid the chance, which might otherwise occur, of unintentionally suggesting to the reader real individuals, who were far from ...
— Loss and Gain - The Story of a Convert • John Henry Newman

... at any rate he was confined when the messenger of death sent by Theodoric found him. There is some doubt as to the mode of execution adopted. One pretty good contemporary authority says that he was beheaded, but the writer whom I have chiefly followed, who was almost a contemporary, but a credulous one, says that torture was applied, that a cord was twisted round his forehead till his eyes started from their sockets, and that finally ...
— Theodoric the Goth - Barbarian Champion of Civilisation • Thomas Hodgkin

... letter-writer. Those who may feel curious to know more about this matter are referred for further ...
— The Red Eric • R.M. Ballantyne

... and Douai, Wykeham's foundation sank, as has been said, into inglorious ease for two centuries. Yet, during this period, it had the honour of producing two of the Seven Bishops who resisted King James II's attack on the English Constitution—one of them the saintly hymn writer, Thomas Ken. And to the darkest days of the eighteenth century belongs the most famous picture of the ideal Oxford life: "I spent many years, in that illustrious society, in a well-regulated course of useful discipline and studies, and in ...
— The Charm of Oxford • J. Wells

... more, but they did not waste so much, and they never did any sort of washing in their rooms. Cornelia did not know who or what some of them were; but she made sure of a theatrical manager; two or three gentlemen in different branches of commerce; a newspaper writer of some sort, and an oldish gentleman who had been with Mrs. Montgomery a great while, and did not seem to be anything but a gentleman boarder, pure and simple. They were all very civil and quiet, and they bore with the amiable American fortitude the hardships of the ...
— The Coast of Bohemia • William Dean Howells

... was explained by a writer in the New York Times (January 29, 1919). "These people declined to part with their heritage. It was here that the power of the Japanese Government was felt in a manner altogether Asiatic.... Through ...
— Korea's Fight for Freedom • F.A. McKenzie

... appeared in the January number, and Mrs Ffolliot and Mary fell foul of it because it was too painful. They thought it pitiless, even savage, in its inexorable disregard of the individual and deification of the Cause. Grantly, of course, upheld the writer. The male of the species prides itself on inhumanity in youth. Mr Ffolliot approved the story from the artistic standpoint, and the General defended it on the score of its absolute truth. Reggie, quite contrary to custom, gave no opinion at all till he was asked by Mary, one day when ...
— The Ffolliots of Redmarley • L. Allen Harker

... Almighty to ordain so near a union, and that for two causes; the first, for the increase of posterity; the second, to restrain man's wandering desires and affections; nay, that they might be yet happier, when God has joined them together, he "blessed them," as in Gen. ii. An ancient writer, contemplating this happy state, says, in the economy of Xenophon, "that the marriage bed is not only the most pleasant, but also profitable course of life, that may be entered on for the preservation and increase of posterity. Wherefore, since marriage is the most safe, and delightful situation ...
— The Works of Aristotle the Famous Philosopher • Anonymous

... P. Rogers of the Cincinnati Law School was elected president, and Professor Elbert Russell, secretary and treasurer. The president and the secretary, President Noah E. Byers of Goshen College, and Professor Stephen F. Weston of Antioch College constituted the executive committee. The writer has remained on the executive committee from the beginning, as either an ...
— Prize Orations of the Intercollegiate Peace Association • Intercollegiate Peace Association

... terms contained in his first communication. Savigno was directed to send Ricardo Ferara at a given hour to a certain crossroads above San Sebastiano with ten thousand lire. In that case candles would be burned and masses said for the soul of the murdered Galli, so the writer promised. The letter put no penalty upon a failure to comply with these demands, beyond a vague prediction of evil. It was short and business-like and very much to ...
— The Net • Rex Beach

... Boston games it has been alleged that the team was in poor condition when it left the metropolis for the Hub to play this closing series, and that its true condition was kept a secret by the management, one writer going so far as to say that Manager Ewing's brother John was at that time disabled by a sprained ankle, while Rusie was suffering from a bruised leg, and also that Whistler had been playing at first base so well that Ewing thought he could afford to give Conner a day or two off, all of which ...
— A Ball Player's Career - Being the Personal Experiences and Reminiscensces of Adrian C. Anson • Adrian C. Anson

... the fact that the canonist teaching assigned the correct proportions in production to land, capital, and labour, in contrast to all the later schools of economists, who have exaggerated the importance of one or the other of these factors.[1] Even Knies, who was the first modern writer to insist on the importance of the cost of production as an element of value, states that the Church sought to fix the price of goods in accordance with the cost of production (Herstellungskosten) and the consumption ...
— An Essay on Mediaeval Economic Teaching • George O'Brien

... the Play are twin-sisters in the family of Fiction; that the one is a drama narrated, as the other is a drama acted; and that all the strong and deep emotions which the Play-writer is privileged to excite, the Novel-writer is privileged to excite also, I have not thought it either politic or necessary, while adhering to realities, to adhere to every-day realities only. In ...
— Basil • Wilkie Collins

... on the backs of mules over the Balkans to Belgrade, where it was transferred to barges and carried up the Danube. Another illicit trade route was from the desolate shores of Dalmatia through Hungary. The writer of a pamphlet, "England, Ireland, and America," states that his firm then employed 500 horses on and near that coast in carrying British goods into Central Europe, and that the cost of getting them into France was "about L28 per cwt., or more than fifty times the present ...
— The Life of Napoleon I (Volumes, 1 and 2) • John Holland Rose

... the different states of society, must share in some degree in this progressive march. But there are two things in literary work: on the one hand the ideas and social manners which it expresses, on the other the intelligence, the feeling, the imagination of the writer who becomes its interpreter. While the former of these elements tends incessantly to a greater perfection, the latter is subject to all the hazards of individual genius. Accordingly the progressive literature is only in the inspiration, and so to speak in the matter; ...
— The Works of Frederich Schiller in English • Frederich Schiller

... The writer of the following pages has been deeply affected, by the consideration of the strange and melancholy fact—that Christianity has made little or no progress for fifteen successive centuries: and having, as he trusts, perceived, in an attentive perusal of the Gospel History,[1] that ...
— Christian Devotedness • Anthony Norris Groves

... experiment upon the discernment of his countrymen has been hazarded by a writer who (whatever may be his real merit) has had no inconsiderable share in the applauses of his party(1); and who, upon this false and unfounded suggestion, has built a series of observations equally false and unfounded. Let him ...
— The Federalist Papers • Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, and James Madison

... judgment and genius rested on an utterly false theory. This, and its proofs and grounds have been—I should not have said adopted, but produced as their own legitimate children by some, and by others the merit of them attributed to a foreign writer, whose lectures were not given orally till two years after mine, rather than to their countryman; though I dare appeal to the most adequate judges, as Sir George Beaumont, the Bishop of Durham, Mr. Sotheby, and afterwards to Mr. Rogers and Lord Byron, whether there is one ...
— Literary Remains, Vol. 2 • Coleridge

... A writer, in the reign of Charles I, whom we may reckon, says Langbaine, among poets of the third rate, but who in strict justice cannot rise above a fifth. He was patronized by Sir John Suckling. He has seven plays and masks extant, besides ...
— The Lives of the Poets of Great Britain and Ireland (1753) - Volume II • Theophilus Cibber

... both sexes, beginning at an age when a child begins to love a fairy tale—all might read it or listen to it, without tedium." Every one will draw from it what he most needs. Not less than upon these he sees its wholesome effect on the creative writer, its refreshing influence on the critic. But most of all he dwells on its heroic qualities, inseparable to him from what is religious in the "Odyssey"; and, says Gogol, this book contains the idea that a human being, "wherever he might be, whatever pursuit he might follow, is threatened by ...
— Taras Bulba and Other Tales • Nikolai Vasilievich Gogol

... expressed themselves as being delighted. One man said to a colored bishop that he didn't know there was a Negro in the state that could have delivered such an address. The fact is, both the good bishop and the writer of these lines might have found him twenty who could, at least, deliver an address as good, and ten, probably, who could deliver a better. Well, we don't know each other—we white and black folk. We are neighbors, yet strangers. Our thoughts, our motives, our ...
— Twentieth Century Negro Literature - Or, A Cyclopedia of Thought on the Vital Topics Relating - to the American Negro • Various

... inculcated by this lucky find at the library, it was not long before Nickey acquired from the same source a veritable collection of volumes on the polite arts and crafts—"The Ready Letter-Writer"; "Manners Maketh Man"; "Seven Thousand Errors of Speech;" "Social Culture in the ...
— Hepsey Burke • Frank Noyes Westcott

... That writer does the most good who gives his reader the greatest amount of knowledge and takes from him the least time. A tremendous thought may be packed into a small compass, and as solid as ...
— Reading Made Easy for Foreigners - Third Reader • John L. Huelshof

... already quoted, "had contrived to unite the opposite extremes of bigotry and indifference"; and these blended influences, which led Gibbon first to Rome, and then to skepticism, proved no doubt to the average mind a mere narcotic to all spiritual life. Gibbon is not the only great writer who has recorded his testimony against Hanoverian Oxford. Adam Smith in that work which has been called, with pardonable exaggeration, "the most important book that ever was written," the "Wealth of Nations," ...
— Little Journeys to the Homes of the Great, Volume 9 - Subtitle: Little Journeys to the Homes of Great Reformers • Elbert Hubbard

... grand Roman palazzo is in the Bocca di Leone in the old part of Rome. The Torlonia have an only daughter, Donna Teresa, whose debutante ball a year ago is said to have been the most magnificent entertainment in Rome for fifty years. A writer, in a recent article on the nobility of Rome, said ...
— Italy, the Magic Land • Lilian Whiting

... warning him that by this very mode of sending embassies and presents, which the English were now following towards the states of central Africa, they had made themselves masters of India, and trampled on all its native princes. The writer therefore gave it as his opinion, that the European travellers should immediately be put to death. An alarm indeed had been spread through Sockatoo, that the English were coming to invade Houssa. The sultan ...
— Lander's Travels - The Travels of Richard Lander into the Interior of Africa • Robert Huish

... that the writer of the above lines undertakes to speak on a subject of which he knows nothing; but what will they say of a writer who, in the same journal, thus expresses himself relative to the issues of the ...
— Great Britain and the American Civil War • Ephraim Douglass Adams

... only a justifiably angry letter, it was a very disagreeable letter, the writer saying plainly that Mrs. Crofton had been very much to blame for recommending such ...
— What Timmy Did • Marie Adelaide Belloc Lowndes

... Arlington, nor the confiding young law-students of Pittsburg. A lengthy letter was penned to the Hon. John Smith, and, at the same sitting, a model billet-doux to Mrs. Rosemary. Other business was combined with this epistolary industry, for, even before the stamp of the writer's seal was lifted from the soft, red wafer on the widow's letter, a backwoods settler came, by appointment, to close a bargain by which the flatboat "Salome" ...
— A Dream of Empire - Or, The House of Blennerhassett • William Henry Venable

... need no excuse for its jerky brevity. It said that his pet girl, Miss Kirby, was married to the Earl of Fleetwood in the first week of last month, and was now to be found at a shop No. 45 Longways, Whitechapel; that the writer was ill, unable to stir; that he would be in London within eight-and-forty hours at furthest. He begged Lady Arpington to send down to the place and have the young countess fetched to her, and ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... above the air-tight cyst, where it was still hardened. It would seem as though Nature was intending to dissolve this lump, and carry it off by absorption. She knows how, and would have done it, in the opinion of the writer, had she ...
— Cattle and Their Diseases • Robert Jennings

... as precocious as his matured abilities are brilliant, and he had at this time published a book. One evening during the last season the present writer formed one of a group of three to whom he narrated, in a most charming manner, how he had made the acquaintance of the great publisher Hachette, a granddaughter of whom was another of the trio. He had left his manuscript at the publishing-house, ...
— Lippincott's Magazine, Vol. 22, September, 1878 • Various

... was not addressed to any one; the writer had simply begun what she had to say and told her story through to the end, and then signed her name in full in a ...
— The Masked Bridal • Mrs. Georgie Sheldon

... handed him the letter. It bore the Paris postmark, and Schrotter's name and address in a large, clumsy hand. Nothing on the outside to betray that it was for Wilhelm. Auguste—Wilhelm divined at once that he was the writer of the letter—had not thought of putting it in a second envelope directed to Wilhelm, or of adding his name ...
— The Malady of the Century • Max Nordau

... given to all athletic interests, which by this time were beginning to be organized. As a natural result the student demand for a real gymnasium was becoming more and more vociferous. As far back as 1868 the University Chronicle had voiced the sentiment in a two-column editorial, in which the writer thus describes the awful state of the University, when the only form of exercise ...
— The University of Michigan • Wilfred Shaw

... lovely evening in June. The sun had set, though the heavens still glowed with those exquisite and radiant tints which the writer, when a child, used to imagine were vouchsafed to mortals to show them something while yet on earth, of the glories of the New Jerusalem. The moon shed her silvery light all around, distinctly revealing every feature of the beautiful scene which has been described, ...
— Choice Readings for the Home Circle • Anonymous

... work well. It is clear, strong and entertaining—this biography. If the writer seems more enthusiastic about Anne Royall than the reader becomes, that is clearly due to an unusual perception of life-values; a recognition of the noble devotion and high courage of her subject, and an intense sympathy ...
— The Forerunner, Volume 1 (1909-1910) • Charlotte Perkins Gilman

... A modern writer, commenting upon this story, says, "There is something uncanny about the Celts which makes them love a Trinity of ideas, and the old stories of the Welsh collected in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries include a story very similar ...
— From John O'Groats to Land's End • Robert Naylor and John Naylor

... the newspapers prefer to remain newspapers, at least in quality if not in form; and I heard a story the other day from a charming young writer of his experience with them, which may have some instruction for the magazines that less wisely aim to become newspapers. He said that when he carried his work to the editors they struck out what he thought the best of it, because it was what they called magaziny; not contemptuously, ...
— Henry James, Jr. • William Dean Howells

... with important decisions. He was through life an able, clear-headed, man of business, and I have seen several legal documents, written in his own hand and evidently drawn by himself. They stand the test of general professional observation; and their writer, by preparing documents of facts of such a character on his own responsibility, showed that he had considerable confidence in his ability to adhere to the forms adequate for the occasion. He talked of it as 'an ancient prejudice ...
— Hume - (English Men of Letters Series) • T.H. Huxley

... a Minnesota farmer to the present writer, "it don't matter a cent what sort of a pull a man has, how many guns he carries, or how many dollars are behind him; if he breaks the law up there in the North-west, he knows he's just got to be jailed for it, sure as he's alive. It may take a day, or it may take a ...
— Jan - A Dog and a Romance • A. J. Dawson

... protection of the Duke of Burgundy. But it has of late years been very generally assigned (though on rather slender grounds of probability, and none of positive evidence), to Anthony de la Salle, the best French prose writer of the fifteenth century, except Comines, and one on whom, with an odd unanimity, conjectural criticism has bestowed, besides his acknowledged romance of late chivalrous society, Petit Jehan de Saintre (a work which itself has ...
— The Tales Of The Heptameron, Vol. I. (of V.) • Margaret, Queen Of Navarre

... which, though tipped with elegance, are none the less sharp-pointed, sometimes in the shape of studied reproaches, but more frequently still with the spontaneous overflowings of a towering wrath. The writer then reveals herself from beneath the guise of the woman of the world, and it is clearly seen that in that encompassed life the heart has for a ...
— Political Women, Vol. 2 (of 2) • Sutherland Menzies

... during the Commonwealth. After the Restoration he negotiated Charles II.'s principal money transactions. He was M.P. for Wendover in the parliament of 1679, and in the Oxford parliament of 1680. According to the writer of the life in the "Diet. of Nat. Biog. "his heirs did not ultimately suffer any pecuniary loss by the closure of the Exchequer. Mr. Hilton Price stated that Backwell removed to Holland in 1676, and died therein 1679; but this is disproved by the pedigree in Lipscomb's "Hist. ...
— Diary of Samuel Pepys, Complete • Samuel Pepys

... writer of the interview confessed himself unable to discover, was guessed by the more or less clear-sighted minds that perceived a connection with the facts which had occurred the day before at the Chateau d'Ambrumesy, and which were reported, down to ...
— The Hollow Needle • Maurice Leblanc

... dingle between Wenlock and Buildwas, at a point described by an old writer as the boundary of the domains of the two abbeys, is Lawless Cross, formerly one of those ancient sanctuaries, the resort of outlaws who, having committed crime, availed themselves of that security from punishment such places afforded. The monks, in the exercise of that excessive influence ...
— Handbook to the Severn Valley Railway - Illustrative and Descriptive of Places along the Line from - Worcester to Shrewsbury • J. Randall

... then, not content with that monstrous act, had fallen upon and beaten to death a gentleman in whom they thought they detected a resemblance to some person who had been, or was suspected of being that miner's accomplice; "but so far from that," said the writer, "we are now informed, on sure authority, that the gentleman in question is a large and wealthy landed proprietor, quite beyond any temptation to crime or dishonesty, and had actually visited this part of the world only in the character of a peace-maker, and to discharge a very delicate ...
— A Perilous Secret • Charles Reade

... pleasure equal to that of receiving and reading a chatty and well-worded epistle from some dear friend. I have some packets of letters preserved to-day that I read and reread. They are always fresh and interesting to me. They are a complete index to the character of the writer, and they serve, after long years have passed, to bring up again delightful pictures of days and scenes which were brighter. However, there is one rule a man must observe: never keep a compromising letter—if ...
— The Complete Bachelor - Manners for Men • Walter Germain

... estate and title in England; and he expressed a hope that Colonel Ross would not refuse to allow him to look forward to the possession of his daughter's hand. It was, it must be stated, a very humble and moderate letter, considering the position the writer enjoyed. ...
— The Young Rajah • W.H.G. Kingston

... Vandermere answered grimly, "but his is not the Thespian stage. He is a lecturer and writer on occultism, and in his way, I ...
— The Moving Finger • E. Phillips Oppenheim

... Ruskin at his best; lectured with him at the Working Men's College; visited him at Denmark Hill; and in later years often saw and corresponded with him. The result is a study of the writer marked in equal measure by discrimination and sympathy; and a picture of the ...
— Sydney Smith • George W. E. Russell

... much more of the crust and wing of age and experience than was found in either of the fashionable novels. The real charm of Contarini is in its abstractedness, and consists in being pleased and puzzled at the same moment. The embellishment which the playful genius of the writer has gracefully, not tawdrily, thrown over his pages will attract, but the main purpose and merit of the work lies in its undercurrents, or, rather it would consist in this feature if the judgment of the writer were still more matured. Perhaps Mr. D'Israeli, who began the world of letters ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction - Vol. XX. No. 556., Saturday, July 7, 1832 • Various

... sojourn of six or seven years on the prairies only deepened my love and longing for the dear old State of Massachusetts. I came back in the summer of 1852, and the unwritten remainder of my sketch is chiefly that of a teacher's and writer's experience; regarding which latter I will add, for the gratification of those who have desired them, a ...
— A New England Girlhood • Lucy Larcom

... remained, to our great instruction, what their ancestors were millions of years ago. People create a difficulty for themselves by imagining that, if evolution is true, all animals must evolve. A glance at our own fellows will show the error of this. Of one family of human beings, as a French writer has said, one only becomes a Napoleon; the others remain Lucien, Jerome, or Joseph. Of one family of animals or trees, some advance in one or other direction; some remain at the original level. There is no "law of progress." The accidents of the world and hereditary endowment impel some ...
— The Story of Evolution • Joseph McCabe

... anxiety to stand straight, have leaned backwards; and by no one perhaps will the ultra-Tory view of the Revolution be found so clearly expressed as by them. At the same time the history of the Revolution has been rewritten by some English historians; and we have a writer like Lecky declaring that the American Revolution 'was the work of an energetic minority, who succeeded in committing an undecided and fluctuating majority to courses for which they had little love, and leading them step by step to a ...
— The United Empire Loyalists - A Chronicle of the Great Migration - Volume 13 (of 32) in the series Chronicles of Canada • W. Stewart Wallace

... reptile, Professor Phillips has been able to determine many very interesting points as to the anatomy and habits of this colossal animal, the total length of which he estimates as being probably not less than sixty or seventy feet. As to its mode of life, this accomplished writer remarks:— ...
— The Ancient Life History of the Earth • Henry Alleyne Nicholson

... break the seal. The contents were to the effect that my husband had been lying for several days at one of the hotels there, very ill, but now past the crisis of his disease, and thought by the physician to be out of danger. The writer urged me, from my husband, to come on immediately. In eight hours from the time I received that letter, I was in New York. Alas! it was too late; the disease had returned with double violence, and snapped the feeble thread of life. ...
— Home Scenes, and Home Influence - A Series of Tales and Sketches • T. S. Arthur

... enough away to see the sturdy pinnacled tower that rises above the desecrated lower portions of the building. In this tower hangs the curfew-bell, which is rung at 6 a.m. and 8 p.m., a custom, according to one writer, 'that has continued ever since the time of William ...
— Yorkshire Painted And Described • Gordon Home

... awful fact of human experience. One of them is the faculty of thought. Man is made a thinking creature, and think he must; and if he thinks, he must, above all, think about himself, about his future, his present, his past. A great French writer—and not a Christian writer—says on this subject: "There is a spectacle grander than the ocean, and that is the conscience. After many conflicts, man yields to that mysterious power which says to him, 'Think.' One can no more prevent the mind from returning ...
— Our Master • Bramwell Booth

... most influential English writer of that time, marks all this by the mental interval between his "French Revolution" and his "Frederick the Great." In both he was Germanic. Carlyle was really as sentimental as Goethe; and Goethe was really as sentimental as Werther. Carlyle understood everything about the French ...
— The Crimes of England • G.K. Chesterton

... of travelling by mail-coach in one of its phases is thus described by a writer in connection with a severe snow-storm which occurred in March 1827: "The night mail from Edinburgh to Glasgow left Edinburgh in the afternoon, but was stopped before reaching Kirkliston. The guard with the mail-bags set forward on horseback, and ...
— A Hundred Years by Post - A Jubilee Retrospect • J. Wilson Hyde

... carols written of late years is Miss Louise Imogen Guiney's Tryste Noel. It is deliberately archaic, and (for reasons hinted at above) I take deliberate archaism to be about the worst fault a modern carol-writer can commit. Also it lacks the fine simplicity of Christina Rossetti's In the bleak midwinter. I ought to dislike it, too, for its sophisticated close. Yet its curious rhythm and curious words haunt me in ...
— From a Cornish Window - A New Edition • Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... To the present writer it seems probable that Gneisenau's action, in the first instance, was undertaken as the readiest means of reuniting the Prussian wings. But Gneisenau cannot have been blind to the advantages of a reunion with Wellington, which a northerly march would open out. The report ...
— The Life of Napoleon I (Volumes, 1 and 2) • John Holland Rose

... A Leipsic writer gives an account of a number of superstitious artists, some of which are very curious. Tietjens, for instance, believed that the person would speedily die who shook hands with her over the threshold at parting; Rachel thought she gained her greatest successes ...
— The Mysteries of All Nations • James Grant

... more attention, but is a lovely art which girls can easily master. The writer was taught to make the flowers of Honiton lace by a little Irish girl, and the variations you can invent are endless. You would find a good sale for insertion lace of the Torchon patterns. Make your own pillow, and buy some cheap bobbins ...
— How Girls Can Help Their Country • Juliette Low

... were short—they were dated; the dates exactly thirty-five years ago. They were evidently from a lover to his mistress, or a husband to some young wife. Not only the terms of expression, but a distinct reference to a former voyage, indicated the writer to have been a seafarer. The spelling and handwriting were those of a man imperfectly educated, but still the language itself was forcible. In the expressions of endearment there was a kind of rough wild love; ...
— The Best Ghost Stories • Various

... in an article by a fellow-scribe, where, doubtless more in sorrow than in anger, that gentleman exposed the worthlessness of the productions of sundry of his brother authors, in which I read that whatever success I had met with as a writer of fiction was due to my literary friends and "nepotic criticism." This is scarcely the case, since when I began to write I do not think that I knew a single creature who had published books—blue books alone excepted. Nobody was ever more outside the ring, or less acquainted ...
— The Idler Magazine, Volume III, April 1893 - An Illustrated Monthly • Various

... is what a man does that counts." By this rule of measurement Mr. Major has a liberal girth. The writing of When Knighthood was in Flower was a deed of no ordinary dimensions, especially when we take into account the fact that the writer had not been trained to authorship or to the literary artist's craft; but was a country lawyer, with an office to sweep every morning, and a few clients with whom to worry over dilatory ...
— When Knighthood Was in Flower • Charles Major

... Friday no less than four letters appeared in the daily Jupiter, all dated from Manchester, all signed by men of the name of Johnson, and all denying that the writer of that special letter had had any dealings whatever with Brown, Jones, and Robinson, of Bishopsgate Street, London. There was "Johnson Brothers," "Johnson and Co.," "Alfred Johnson and Son," and "Johnson and Johnson;" and in one of those letters a suggestion was ...
— The Struggles of Brown, Jones, and Robinson - By One of the Firm • Anthony Trollope

... under the pressure of nervous disease, from active service, while never losing its concern for the public good, its quickness of personal sympathy, nor its interest in the solution of the mightiest problems of humanity, cannot be an altogether unprofitable use of time to the reader, while to the writer it is a work of consecration. He who was at once like a son and brother to my father, he who should have crowned a forty-years' friendship by the fulfilment of this pious task, and who would have done it with a stronger ...
— Autobiography and Letters of Orville Dewey, D.D. - Edited by his Daughter • Orville Dewey

... eyes, and he had a broad white forehead, a sure sign that he was a man of brains. And he had the reputation in our town of being a fine, young man, a modern, and a scholar. He had a sound knowledge of the Bible, and was a writer of distinction. That is to say, he had a beautiful hand. They say that his manuscripts were carried around and shown in the whole world. And along with these qualities, he had money, and he had one little daughter—an ...
— Jewish Children • Sholem Naumovich Rabinovich

... a Quaker philanthropist and writer, born at Earlham Hall, near Norwich; in 1818 he became a Quaker minister; he energetically co-operated with his sister, Mrs. Elizabeth Fry, in bringing about a reform of the prison system, and otherwise spent his life in philanthropic work; his works include "Prison Discipline," 1819, "Religious ...
— The Nuttall Encyclopaedia - Being a Concise and Comprehensive Dictionary of General Knowledge • Edited by Rev. James Wood

... author comes before us in M. VELLEIUS PATERCULUS, the court historian of Tiberius. This well-intentioned but loquacious writer gained his loyalty from an experience of eight years' warfare under Tiberius in various parts of Europe, and the flattery of which he is so lavish was probably sincere. His birth may perhaps be referred to 18 B.C., since his first campaign, under M. Vinicius, to whose son he ...
— A History of Roman Literature - From the Earliest Period to the Death of Marcus Aurelius • Charles Thomas Cruttwell

... quarters of the globe—transmitted to us through their own hands—very generally, and often very deservedly, receives high commendation. Such passages will be found, however, to be based upon facts admitting of no contradiction, and which have come immediately under the writer's cognizance. The conclusions deduced from these facts are unavoidable, and in stating them the author has been influenced by no feeling of animosity, either to the individuals themselves, or to that glorious cause which has not always ...
— Typee - A Romance of the South Sea • Herman Melville

... from another judge of equal character, considering the age wherein he lived; that is, Chancellor Fortescue in 'Praise of the Laws of England,' page 59. This is a very ancient writer on the English law. ...
— The World's Best Orations, Vol. 1 (of 10) • Various

... to his death he preached to the Essex Street congregation in London. He wrote a popular work on the Evidences of Christianity, and he translated the Epistles of St. Paul. He was a vigorous and able writer. ...
— Unitarianism in America • George Willis Cooke

... Woodworth, the author of this familiar song, was an American, the editor of many publications and the writer of a great many poems; but no one of the latter is now remembered, except ...
— Journeys Through Bookland, Vol. 7 • Charles H. Sylvester

... caught may have turned the scale. An adroitly worded letter was sent to him, purporting to come from Charles Murchison, a California voter of English birth, asking confidential advice which might enable the writer "to assure many of our countrymen that they would do England a service by voting for Cleveland and against the Republican system of tariff." With an astonishing lack of astuteness, the British minister fell into the trap and sent a ...
— The Cleveland Era - A Chronicle of the New Order in Politics, Volume 44 in The - Chronicles of America Series • Henry Jones Ford

... in making a loose people "attend to a Passion which they never, or that very faintly, felt in their own Bosoms." La Rochefoucauld wrote: "It is with true love as with ghosts; everybody speaks of it, but few have seen it." A writer in Science expressed his belief that romantic love, as described in my first book, could really be experienced only by men of genius. I think that this makes the circle too small; yet in these twelve years of additional observation I have come to the ...
— Primitive Love and Love-Stories • Henry Theophilus Finck

... together the brief life stories and incidents from great lives which make up the pages of this little volume, the writer's object has been to show young people that, no matter how humble their birth or circumstances, they may make lives that will be held up as examples to future generations, even as these stories show how boys, handicapped ...
— Eclectic School Readings: Stories from Life • Orison Swett Marden

... on this paper precisely accord with those on the note. The witness has given what seems to me irrefutable testimony that he was the writer of that signature, as well as of the letters to the cardinal. He was the culpable instrument of the criminal Lamotte-Valois. Those of the judges who are of my opinion ...
— Marie Antoinette And Her Son • Louise Muhlbach

... Leader she meant to be; and marshalled her forces to that end. She Patronized here, and Donated there; revised her visiting list with rigid exclusiveness; secured an Eminent Professor and a Noted Writer as visitors, and gave entertainments ...
— The Forerunner, Volume 1 (1909-1910) • Charlotte Perkins Gilman

... A FEMALE writer says, "Nothing looks worse on a lady than darned stockings." Allow us to observe that stockings which need darning look much worse than darned ones—Darned if ...
— The Book of Anecdotes and Budget of Fun; • Various

... type of Science Fiction, any kind, if well written, will do. As it happens, the king of authors, A. Merritt, has a type all his own, as Mr. Bryant notes, which is unbeatable, and my favorite. However, at times, a good writer may fall down in his fundamental assumptions. I don't care where or how far he goes, so long as he starts with something that present-day science does not deny. Here is where "The Soul Master" fell down, and, even more so, "The Soul Snatcher." Better leave souls ...
— Astounding Stories of Super-Science, November, 1930 • Various

... abruptly; but, in case our readers are curious to know the end of our hero's adventure, they will be interested to learn that at the identical moment when the writer reached this point in his diary, the Cambridge fellows did turn up. They had, indeed, been out searching the hills from very early morning for the wanderer. As he did not arrive the night before at Wastdale, they had concluded he had ...
— Parkhurst Boys - And Other Stories of School Life • Talbot Baines Reed

... more independent. This little wooden writer became the fashion chiefly through Madame de Girardin. Its communications soothed her last days, and prepared her for a death fragrant with hope. She believed she was in communication with the spirits of Sappho, Shakespeare, Madame de Sevigne, and Moliere; and amidst these convictions she ...
— The Arena - Volume 4, No. 19, June, 1891 • Various

... forthwith. And on sufficient evidence: let the average unprejudiced person of to-day take up the old volume and read a few chapters anywhere and decide whether it is the work of a mere humorist, or also of a philosopher, a poet, and a seer. The writer well remembers a little group of "the simple-hearted multitude" who during the winter of '69 and '70 gathered each evening to hear the Innocents read aloud, and their unanimous verdict that it was the ...
— Mark Twain, A Biography, 1835-1910, Complete - The Personal And Literary Life Of Samuel Langhorne Clemens • Albert Bigelow Paine

... identity of its author was misrepresented; it was said that this was an earlier and ruder attempt of the same pen which had produced 'Jane Eyre.' Unjust and grievous error! We laughed at it at first, but I deeply lament it now. Hence, I fear, arose a prejudice against the book. That writer who could attempt to palm off an inferior and immature production under cover of one successful effort, must indeed be unduly eager after the secondary and sordid result of authorship, and pitiably indifferent to its true and honourable ...
— Charlotte Bronte's Notes on the pseudonyms used • Charlotte Bronte

... moment, affects me like the song of birds, and Burns crooning some verses, simple and wild, in accordance with their native melody.... We shall appreciate him better as a poet, hereafter; for there is no writer whose life, as a man, has so much to do with his fame, and throws such a necessary light upon whatever he has produced. Henceforth, there will be a personal warmth for us in everything that he wrote; and, like his countrymen, we shall know him in a kind of personal way, as if we had shaken ...
— Seeing Europe with Famous Authors - Vol. II Great Britain And Ireland, Part Two • Francis W. Halsey

... popular MARJORY-JOE SERIES is as lovable and original as any of the other creations of this writer of charming stories. We get little peeps at the precious twins, at the healthy minded Joe and sweet Marjory. There is a bungalow party, which lasts the entire summer, in which all of the characters of the previous MARJORY-JOE stories participate, and their ...
— Blue Bonnet in Boston - or, Boarding-School Days at Miss North's • Caroline E. Jacobs

... remember, dearest, it is my express wish that you should make known to all the world that you are Valmai Wynne, the beloved wife of Caradoc Wynne." Page after page was written with the lavish fervour of a first love-letter, very interesting to the writer no doubt, but which we will leave to the privacy of the envelope which Cardo addressed and sealed with such care. He placed it in his desk, not expecting that the opportunity for sending it would so soon arrive. In the course of the afternoon, there was ...
— By Berwen Banks • Allen Raine

... might, in the case of the passage under consideration, most easily concede what we are contending against, that [Hebrew: wmh] is used instead of [Hebrew: wM], as a kind of grammatical blunder; but that the writer knew the difference between these two forms clearly appears from the close of the verse, where, certainly, he would not have put [Hebrew: wmh] for [Hebrew: wM]. These are the instances adduced by Winer. Gesenius, further, refers [Pg 264] ...
— Christology of the Old Testament: And a Commentary on the Messianic Predictions, v. 1 • Ernst Wilhelm Hengstenberg

... cluster of rooms, built partly on a rocky ledge and partly on adjoining loose earth and rocky debris, a land slide had carried away half of a circular kiva, exposing a well-defined section of its floor and the debris within the room. Here the writer found a number of partly finished sandals of yucca fiber, with the long, unwoven fiber carefully wrapped about the finished portion of the work, as though the sandals had been temporarily laid aside until the maker could again work on them. A number of coils of yucca fiber, similar to that used ...
— A Study of Pueblo Architecture: Tusayan and Cibola • Victor Mindeleff and Cosmos Mindeleff

... is almost nearer to the Western idea of a poet than any other Chinese writer. He was fortunate enough to be born when the great love-tragedy of Ming Huang and T'ai Chen was still fresh in the minds of men. He had the right perspective, being not too near and yet able to ...
— A Lute of Jade/Being Selections from the Classical Poets of China • L. Cranmer-Byng

... writer speaks with discriminating praise concerning Lincoln's oratory, p. 139. It is an illustration of Lincoln's habit of adopting for permanent use any expression that pleased him, that this same phrase ...
— Abraham Lincoln, Vol. I. • John T. Morse

... phrases and some facts which evidently did not belong to a mere fabricator. Some years after, I compared this "Wedding Night" with what I had all assurance of having been transcribed from the actual manuscripts of Byron, and was persuaded that the magazine-writer must have had the actual statement before him, or have had a perusal of it. The writer in "Blackwood" declared his conviction that it really was ...
— Lady Byron Vindicated • Harriet Beecher Stowe

... about four times as great as for the middling qualities of Uplands,—probably an average of from thirty-five to forty-five cents per pound; and for particular brands[C] sixty to seventy cents is often paid. The writer has seen a few bales, of a most beautiful color and length of staple, which sold for eighty cents, when middling Uplands brought but ten cents per pound. It is mostly shipped to France, where it is used for manufacturing the finest laces, and contributes ...
— Continental Monthly, Vol. I., No. IV., April, 1862 - Devoted To Literature And National Policy • Various

... reverse awaited her. She was sitting with her father the rector, and her still unmarried sister, Jane Hayley, in the drawing-room of Seyton House, when a note was brought to her, signed Edward Chilton, the writer of which demanded an immediate and private interview, on, he alleged, the most important business. Lady Seyton remembered the name, and immediately acceded to the man's request. He announced in a brusque, insolent tone and manner, ...
— The Experiences of a Barrister, and Confessions of an Attorney • Samuel Warren

... story by the creator of "Susan Clegg" will add materially to her reputation as a writer of popular fiction. "Aunt Mary" and her adventures in New York are simply delicious; and her nephew, Jack, and his college friends, who personally conduct her through the metropolis, are brimful of brightness and humor. A pretty love story runs through the book. "Aunt Mary's" magazine ...
— Susan Clegg and a Man in the House • Anne Warner

... following Allemannus, conceives that Belisarius was confounded with John of Cappadocia, who was thus reduced to beggary, (vol. ix. p. 58, 449.) Lord Mahon has, with considerable learning, and on the authority of a yet unquoted writer of the eleventh century, endeavored to reestablish the old tradition. I cannot acknowledge that I have been convinced, and am inclined to subscribe to the ...
— The History of The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire - Volume 4 • Edward Gibbon

... Says a writer in The Daily Chronicle: "In one neighbourhood within the Zeppelin zone there are hundreds of partridges who defy the Defence of the Realm Act. Two or three hours before anyone else is aware that the ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 150, May 10, 1916 • Various

... writer remarks, "that the variety now exists only in name. That which is sold for the Early Charlton is often a degenerated stock of Early Frames, or any stock of Frames which cannot be warranted or depended upon, but which are, nevertheless, of such a character as to admit ...
— The Field and Garden Vegetables of America • Fearing Burr

... One"; not the declaring that all men are one, that all men are brothers: we can all do that. Anyone who has reached a certain stage of intellectual knowledge will recognise the unity of mankind; will say, with the writer in the Christian book, that God has made all men of one blood—quoted again from what is called a Pagan book. That intellectual recognition of the unity is practically universal among educated people; but very few are prepared to carry out the intellectual ...
— London Lectures of 1907 • Annie Besant

... she replied: "I do not know that there is much choice between this and the click of the type-writer. But, anyhow, your plan, though it sounds plausible, would not do, because I should not be able to ...
— Apples, Ripe and Rosy, Sir • Mary Catherine Crowley

... in pronouncing La Fiammetta a marvelous performance. John Addington Symonds says: "It is the first attempt in any literature to portray subjective emotion exterior to the writer; since the days of Virgil and Ovid, nothing had been essayed in this region of mental analysis. The author of this extraordinary work proved himself a profound anatomist of feeling by the subtlety with which he dissected a ...
— La Fiammetta • Giovanni Boccaccio

... of the New York "Evangelist" is well known to be one of the most intelligent in the country. Friendly opinions from serial readers were reassuring as far as they went, but of course the great majority of those who followed the story were silent. A writer cannot, like a speaker, look into the eyes of his audience and observe its mental attitude toward his thought. If my memory serves me, Mr. R. R. Bowker was the earliest critic to write some friendly words in the "Evening Mail;" but at first my venture was very generally ignored. Then some ...
— Taken Alive • E. P. Roe

... aunt put in, a little dark woman of French and English ancestry, "you ought to thank God that he has enough imagination to make up stories ... he might be a great writer some day." ...
— Tramping on Life - An Autobiographical Narrative • Harry Kemp

... twine, and we chose that one for good luck because of the twine. Perkins said that was a sufficient excuse for the title, too. We would publish the book anonymously, and let it be known that the only clue to the writer was the crimson cord with which the manuscript was tied when we received it. It ...
— The Wit and Humor of America, Volume III. (of X.) • Various

... also proved agreeably stimulating to me in another way; a comic writer had attributed an anecdote to him according to which, when his friend Caraffa declared himself an admirer of my music, he had served him his fish without sauce at dinner, and explained in so doing that his friend liked music without melody. Rossini openly protested ...
— My Life, Volume II • Richard Wagner

... comment on human nature the shrewdness of which he promptly appreciated. Jacqueline came to represent to him that invaluable portion of a writer's public, the average female mind. Under her proud guidance, Channing knew that he was writing the best and by far the cleanest ...
— Kildares of Storm • Eleanor Mercein Kelly

... A Canadian writer at the present time can refer only with a feeling of indignation and humiliation to the scenes of tumult, rioting and incendiarism, which followed the royal assent to the bill of indemnity. When Lord Elgin left Parliament House—formerly the Ste. Anne ...
— Lord Elgin • John George Bourinot

... into this extinct cockpit, is trenchant and emphatic: the name of Vetus, strenuously fighting there, had become considerable in the talking political world; and, no doubt, was especially of mark, as that of a writer who might otherwise be important, with the proprietors of the Times. The connection continued: widened and deepened itself,—in a slow tentative manner; passing naturally from voluntary into remunerated: and indeed proving more ...
— The Life of John Sterling • Thomas Carlyle

... of the master-writer who overthrew the empire, violently declaimed, recited in the accent of the south, rang through the peaceful drawing-room, shook the old curtains with their rigid folds, seemed to splash the walls, the large upholstered ...
— A Comedy of Marriage & Other Tales • Guy De Maupassant

... from Mrs. Whiting needs no introduction. It bears a melancholy interest from the fact that the beloved writer died shortly afterwards, at Newark, N.J., ...
— The Women of the Arabs • Henry Harris Jessup

... The writer of any narrative of Mrs. Browning's life, or the editor of a collection of her letters, is met at the outset of his task by the knowledge that both Mrs. Browning herself and her husband more than, once expressed their strong ...
— The Letters of Elizabeth Barrett Browning (1 of 2) • Frederic G. Kenyon

... to speak in terms of too high praise of the first geological map of England, which we owe to the industry of this courageous man of science. An accomplished writer says of it, "It was a work so masterly in conception and so correct in general outline, that in principle it served as a basis not only for the production of later maps of the British Islands, but for geological maps of all other parts of the world, wherever they have been undertaken. ...
— Self Help • Samuel Smiles

... by the fierce activities around it, the habit of dwelling on the old wisdom and harping on the ancient strings, is calculated to foster the poetic temper and enrich its resources. The discouraging effect of a sometimes supercilious and conservative criticism is not an unmixed evil. The verse-writer who can be snuffed out by the cavils of a tutorial drone, is a poetaster silenced for his country's good. It is true, however, that to original minds, bubbling with spontaneity, or arrogant with the consciousness of power, the discipline ...
— Byron • John Nichol

... Genesis that the patriarchs preached in the name of Jehovah, this being in plain contradiction to the text above quoted. (26) A reference to what was said in Chap. VIII. will readily explain the difficulty. (27) It was there shown that the writer of the Pentateuch did not always speak of things and places by the names they bore in the times of which he was writing, but by the names best known to his contemporaries. (28) God is thus said in the Pentateuch to have been preached by the patriarchs under the name ...
— A Theologico-Political Treatise [Part III] • Benedict de Spinoza

... students of the so-called human race, that a steamfitter or a manufacturer of suspenders who may not know the difference between the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution—who may not, indeed, know anything at all—is nevertheless a bubbly-fountain of political wisdom; whereas a writer for a newspaper is capable of emitting only drivel. This may be due to the greater opportunity for meditation enjoyed ...
— The So-called Human Race • Bert Leston Taylor

... Travel books imparting no patriotic lesson may well be left to authors and readers of older and self-sufficient nations. A work appealing on common lines to a New World audience would be worse than banal, and a conscientious American writer is compelled to describe not alone what he saw, but in clarion notes tell of some things he failed of seeing for our country, emerging but now from the formative period, and destined to permanently lead the universe in material affairs, is entitled to be better ...
— East of Suez - Ceylon, India, China and Japan • Frederic Courtland Penfield

... observed, has no mark of the writer having any notion of punctuation, but the meaning attached to ...
— Law and Laughter • George Alexander Morton

... and a worldling. The very number of his volumes is a protest to the contrary. One could not write so large a number of pages in so small a number of years without the virtue of industry, a virtue incompatible with habits of dissipation. This does not mean that the writer of these great romances had no love for pleasure and had not tasted the world, but that for him these were secondary things. The psychology of his work ought, then, to find an interpretation other than that afforded by wholly false or exaggerated anecdotes. I wish to indicate here how ...
— Selected Writings of Guy de Maupassant • Guy de Maupassant

... and formerly believed, the same. For the canon of the Mass among them testifies to this, in which the priest clearly prays that the bread may be changed and become the very body of Christ. And Vulgarius, who seems to us to be not a silly writer, says distinctly that bread is not a mere figure, but is truly changed into flesh. And there is a long exposition of Cyril on John 15, in which he teaches that Christ is corporeally offered us in the Supper. For he says thus: Nevertheless, we do not deny that we are joined ...
— The Apology of the Augsburg Confession • Philip Melanchthon

... of Stephenson was related to the writer, near the pit-mouth, by one of the men who had been present and helped to build up the brick wall by which the fire was stayed, though several workmen were suffocated. He related that, when down ...
— Lives of the Engineers - The Locomotive. George and Robert Stephenson • Samuel Smiles

... Gladly would the writer draw a veil over all that followed that insane violation of a solemn pledge, sealed as it had been by the hand-writing of confirmation. But he cannot do it. The truth, and the whole truth needs to be told,—the beacon-light must be raised on the gloomy shores of ...
— The Lights and Shadows of Real Life • T.S. Arthur

... it looked like a sandy plain, or one vast unbroken succession of countless gravel pits—the earth was everywhere turned up—men's heads in every direction were popping up and down from their holes. Well might an Australian writer, in speaking of Bendigo, term it "The Carthage of the Tyre of Forest Creek." The rattle of the cradle, as it swayed to and fro, the sounds of the pick and shovel, the busy hum of so many thousands, the innumerable tents, the stores with large flags hoisted above them, flags ...
— A Lady's Visit to the Gold Diggings of Australia in 1852-53. • Mrs. Charles (Ellen) Clacey

... treatise was originally conceived for the pulpit; and afterwards, probably with great additions, written for the press. This will account for the divisions and sub-divisions, intended to assist a hearer's memory; or to enable a ready writer, by taking notes of each part, to digest prayerfully in private, what he had heard in the public ministry of the word,—a practice productive of great good to individuals, and by which families may be much profited while conversing upon the truths publicly taught in the church; instead of what Bunyan ...
— The Works of John Bunyan • John Bunyan

... To an American writer, I should think it must be a flattering distinction to escape the admiration of the newspapers. Few persons of taste, I imagine, would like such notice as the following, which I copied from a New York paper, where it followed the ...
— Domestic Manners of the Americans • Fanny Trollope

... microscope, as when we turn to the most marked formations of genera and species in geological distribution. The great trouble with Mr. Darwin's vinculum is, that its weakest links are precisely where the strongest should be found, and vice versa. With a candor rarely displayed by a writer who is spinning a theory, he admits this. The geological record is not what he would have it to be. Whole chapters are gone where they are most needed, and nature's lithography seems constantly at fault. Independent species are now and then springing up where ...
— Life: Its True Genesis • R. W. Wright

... this I had nothing but letters from Sylvia. She proved to be an excellent letter-writer, full of verve and colour. I would not say that she poured out her soul to me, but she gave me glimpses of her states of mind, and the progress ...
— Sylvia's Marriage • Upton Sinclair

... For extended discussions of the relations of utility and value the reader is referred to the works of Jevons, Menger, Von Wieser, Von Boehm-Bawerk, and Walras. A study of "effective" utility and its relations to value, by the writer of the present treatise, is contained in the New Englander for ...
— Essentials of Economic Theory - As Applied to Modern Problems of Industry and Public Policy • John Bates Clark



Words linked to "Writer" :   Haley, Arna Wendell Bontemps, Edmond Hoyle, Beauvoir, grey, alliterator, Frances Hodgson Burnett, Gaius Plinius Secundus, Alessandro Manzoni, Dos Passos, literary hack, Ellen Price Wood, Alexandre Dumas, George Sand, gagman, Frank Baum, reviewer, Gothic romancer, Agatha Christie, G. B. Shaw, Feodor Dostoevski, Emerson, Graves, day, George Louis Palmella Busson du Maurier, Elias Canetti, Gide, Flaubert, framer, tragedian, Boyle, Currer Bell, Anderson, Arthur Conan Doyle, Angus Frank Johnstone Wilson, space writer, Donald Barthelme, Edgar Rice Burroughs, Abraham Stoker, David John Moore Cornwell, A.E., Evelyn Waugh, cooper, Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky, Ellison, speechwriter, Charles Dickens, Andre Maurois, Chateaubriand, Hamsun, Boris Pasternak, gagwriter, Baroness Karen Blixen, litterateur, George Bernard Shaw, Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoyevsky, Baronne Anne Louise Germaine Necker de Steal-Holstein, polemicist, Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald, Dame Agatha Mary Clarissa Christie, Francois de La Rochefoucauld, Carson McCullers, novelist, Baron Snow of Leicester, Eleanor Roosevelt, Eliezer Wiesel, scriptwriter, Erskine Preston Caldwell, joint author, Cicily Isabel Fairfield, Caldwell, Eudora Welty, Charles Farrar Browne, Camus, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Edgar Wallace, cummings, Francois-Marie Arouet, Chloe Anthony Wofford, Eugene Sue, Eugene Luther Vidal, Conrad, Doctorow, Edith Newbold Jones Wharton, lyrist, Comte Donatien Alphonse Francois de Sade, Ehrenberg, Bram Stoker, writer's name, Artemus Ward, Franz Kafka, pamphleteer, Aldous Huxley, Gaius Petronius, Francis Richard Stockton, librettist, Cecil Scott Forester, Burroughs, Gertrude Stein, paragrapher, Ferber, contributor, word-painter, gagster, journalist, Ambrose Bierce, Dr. Johnson, Dorothy Parker, Elie Wiesel, Conrad Potter Aiken, Alger, Capek, dickens, Goncourt, Dame Rebecca West, e. e. cummings, Edwin DuBois Hayward, Elwyn Brooks White, George Orwell, First Baron Lytton, Anthony Burgess, Bunyan, Charles Percy Snow, Aleksandr I. Solzhenitsyn, authoress, Carlos Fuentes, abstractor, Damon Runyon, Browne, Golding, Benet, Baroness Dudevant, hall, hale, Dostoyevsky, Ezra Loomis Pound, Gaskell, Barthelme, Carl Van Doren, E. L. Doctorow, Canetti, Alfred Edward Woodley Mason, Belloc, Feodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky, Gordimer, Guy de Maupassant, Bret Harte, Benjamin Franklin Norris Jr., Alice Walker, Andre Gide, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Gorki, Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Dashiell Hammett, Flannery O'Connor, compiler, DuBois Heyward, Gogol, Clive Staples Lewis, Gunter Wilhelm Grass, Fyodor Dostoevski, Gaius Plinius Caecilius Secundus, Dame Muriel Spark, Beerbohm, Ayn Rand, versifier, Beatrice Webb, Baum, Boell, wordsmith, Feodor Mikhailovich Dostoyevsky, Gore Vidal, Georges Joseph Christian Simenon, Defoe, Calvino, Barth, Carl Sandburg, Francois Rene Chateaubriand, C. S. Lewis, Amandine Aurore Lucie Dupin, Charles John Huffam Dickens, Emile Herzog, Feodor Dostoevsky, Clarence Malcolm Lowry, rhymer, Edmond de Goncourt, poetiser, Clarence Day, Dreiser, Dorothy Leigh Sayers, Geisel, Baldwin, Durrell, playwright, Burnett, communicator, Fleming, Chesterton, Bernard Malamud, abstracter, Elizabeth Gaskell, Emily Price Post, Dame Daphne du Maurier, Ernest Hemingway, Eric Blair, Bierce, Dorothy Rothschild Parker, Erle Stanley Gardner, fielding, Cocteau, Elmore John Leonard, Andre Malraux, Ahmed Salman Rushdie, Churchill, Charlotte Bronte, France, Dorothy L. Sayers, Colette, Anne Bronte, Edgar Allan Poe, Gibran, Conan Doyle, author, Anna Eleanor Roosevelt, wordmonger, Feodor Dostoyevsky, goldsmith, Emily Bronte, Adeline Virginia Stephen Woolf, Daniel Defoe, Baraka, Cather, collins, Ford Hermann Hueffer, Dorothy Sayers, Farrell, writer's cramp, Alan Alexander Milne, Bronte, Andersen, G. K. Chesterton, A. Conan Doyle, haggard, Christopher Isherwood, franklin, ghost, buck, Galsworthy, polemist, Alex Haley, Gombrowicz, E. T. A. Hoffmann, Andre Paul Guillaume Gide, Graham Greene, Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, Carson Smith McCullers, Edward Everett Hale, Clarence Shepard Day Jr., drafter, Ezra Pound, de Sade, Anatole France, Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevski, Dame Jean Iris Murdoch, Fitzgerald, Dodgson, Emily Jane Bronte, Ernst Theodor Amadeus Hoffmann, Emily Post, Aldous Leonard Huxley, Frank Morrison Spillane, Alfred de Musset, Hammett, Dostoevsky, De Quincey, Blixen, ford, Christie, Alan Stewart Paton, folk writer, Edward Estlin Cummings, biographer, C. S. Forester, dramatist, Gilbert Keith Chesterton, E. B. White, Ambrose Gwinett Bierce, Alexis de Tocqueville, George Eliot, George William Russell, butler, Erskine Caldwell, Aragon, lyricist, David Herbert Lawrence, Alexis Charles Henri Maurice de Tocqueville, Gaboriau, Dostoevski, Ernst Theodor Wilhelm Hoffmann, Gustave Flaubert, Arthur Koestler, George du Maurier, Dr. Seuss, Feodor Mikhailovich Dostoevski, Benchley, Elizabeth Sanderson Haldane, Albert Camus, Charles Dodgson, Ben Hecht, Clemens, Dinesen, C. P. Snow, Christopher William Bradshaw Isherwood, A. A. Milne, Benjamin Franklin, Cabell, Frank Stockton, grass, Dumas, Alfred Damon Runyon, Aleksey Maksimovich Peshkov, Edna Ferber, Elizabeth Haldane, Emile Gaboriau, Greene, Algren, ghostwriter, Gardner, Georges Simenon, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Edna O'Brien, Ford Madox Ford, Bradbury, Baroness Emmusca Orczy, Alexander Isayevich Solzhenitsyn, Alice Malsenior Walker, du Maurier, Austen, Carl Clinton Van Doren, Haldane, Aleksey Maximovich Peshkov, letter writer, polemic, Franz Werfel, scenarist, Doris Lessing, A. E. W. Mason, Asch, Arouet, Beckett, rhymester, D. H. Lawrence, Frank Norris, Bulwer-Lytton, hack, coauthor, H. G. Wells, Eliot, Cheever, Anthony Trollope



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