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Bush   /bʊʃ/   Listen
Bush

verb
(past & past part. bushed; pres. part. bushing)
1.
Provide with a bushing.



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"Bush" Quotes from Famous Books



... volume, which will be sent you from THE PRAIRIE FARMER office, on remittance of $1.50. But there is something cheaper still, and very good, indeed, but covering different grounds from Hussman. The Grape Catalogue of Bush & Son & Meissner. You may obtain it by sending twenty-five cents to Bush & Son ...
— Prairie Farmer, Vol. 56: No. 3, January 19, 1884. - A Weekly Journal for the Farm, Orchard and Fireside • Various

... MY 'Creation,'" said Haydn, with a gentle smile. "I was not thinking of MY 'Creation' at this moment, but of God's creation. And He certainly knew more about the music of the creation than I did, and- -just listen how the nightingale sings in the elder-bush yonder! It is an air such as is to be found only in God's Creation, and, as Joseph Haydn, with all his talents and enthusiasm, never was able to compose. Oh, how sweetly this prima donna assoluta of the good God sings, and what divine melodies, ...
— Andreas Hofer • Lousia Muhlbach

... lifted from his shoulder. Basil was gone. For a minute he stared blankly at the bush behind which he had disappeared. A warning signal, "At midnight, remember!" came to his ears, and awoke him from his half-stupor. He shook himself, tried to answer, uttered no word, then passed on. He entered his house with ...
— Sea-Dogs All! - A Tale of Forest and Sea • Tom Bevan

... hour, and now I remove half his income, and he is glad to stay on - nay, does not seem to entertain the possibility of leaving. And this in the face of one particular difficulty - I mean our house in the bush, and no society, and no women society ...
— Vailima Letters • Robert Louis Stevenson

... schoolhouse, which he could visit but little, he was taught only reading, writing, and elementary arithmetic. Among the people of the settlement, bush farmers and small tradesmen, he found none of uncommon intelligence or education; but some of them had a few books, which he borrowed eagerly. Thus he read and reread, AEsop's Fables, learning to tell stories with a point and to argue by parables; he read Robinson Crusoe, The ...
— The Papers And Writings Of Abraham Lincoln, Complete - Constitutional Edition • Abraham Lincoln

... Trin. Here's neither bush nor shrub, to bear off[411-8] any weather at all, and another storm brewing; I hear it sing i' the wind: yond same black cloud, yond huge one, looks like a foul bombard[411-9] that would shed his liquor. If it should thunder as it did before, I know not ...
— Journeys Through Bookland, Vol. 8 • Charles H. Sylvester

... trade, my joints the limberest joints on earth and the sternest joints on earth, A Kentuckian walking the vale of the Elkhorn in my deer-skin leggings, a Louisianian or Georgian, A boatman over lakes or bays or along coasts, a Hoosier, Badger, Buckeye; At home on Kanadian snow-shoes or up in the bush, or with fishermen off Newfoundland, At home in the fleet of ice-boats, sailing with the rest and tacking, At home on the hills of Vermont or in the woods of Maine, or the Texan ranch, Comrade of Californians, ...
— Leaves of Grass • Walt Whitman

... is, you want much of meat. Why should you want? Behold, the earth hath roots; Within this mile break forth a hundred springs; The oaks bear mast, the briars scarlet hips; The bounteous housewife, Nature, on each bush Lays her full mess before you. Want! Why ...
— The Life of Timon of Athens • William Shakespeare [Craig edition]

... again there blew a puff of wind, but these sheets of falling water kept it down. Bottle and all, it was a sad and silent drive as far as Penicuik, where they were to spend the evening. They stopped once, to hide their implements in a thick bush not far from the churchyard, and once again at the Fisher's Tryst, to have a toast before the kitchen fire and vary their nips of whisky with a glass of ale. When they reached their journey's end the gig was housed, the horse was fed and comforted, and the two young doctors ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 3 (of 25) • Robert Louis Stevenson

... open sunlit square did my sluggish blood start again. There I came under the genial influence of Squire Crumple's radiating smile, and Mr. Pound and his lugubrious warning were forgotten. The squire was trimming his lilac-bush, and from the green shrubbery his round face lifted slowly, as the sun rises from its night's rest in the eastward ridges and spreads its welcome light over ...
— David Malcolm • Nelson Lloyd

... Golden Rod! Thou garish, gorgeous gush Of passion that consumes hot summer's heart! O! yellowest yolk of love! in yearly hush I stand, awe sobered, at thy burning bush Of Glory, glossed with lustrous and illustrious art, And moan, why poor, so poor in purse and brain I am, While thou into thy trusting treasury dost seem to cram Australia, California, Sinai ...
— Memories and Anecdotes • Kate Sanborn

... against a rock and rested and panted, and let my limps go on trembling until they got steady again; then I crept warily back, alert, watching, and ready to fly if there was occasion; and when I was come near, I parted the branches of a rose-bush and peeped through—wishing the man was about, I was looking so cunning and pretty—but the sprite was gone. I went there, and there was a pinch of delicate pink dust in the hole. I put my finger in, to feel it, and said OUCH! and took it out again. It was a cruel pain. I put my finger in my ...
— The $30,000 Bequest and Other Stories • Mark Twain

... of horsemen rode through the forest, looking behind each bush and tree as if they sought something ...
— Mother Stories • Maud Lindsay

... places hereabouts there is quite a village of these dwellings, with a clay and board chimney, or oftener an old barrel smoked and charred with the fire. Some of their roofs are covered with sods, and appear almost subterranean. One of the little hamlets stands on both sides of a deep dell, wooded and bush-grown, with a vista, as it were, into the heart of a wood in one direction, and to the broad, sunny river in the other: there was a little rivulet, crossed by a plank, at the bottom of the dell. At two doors we saw very pretty and modest-looking ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 17, No. 100, February, 1866 • Various

... decaying rose bush till you have tried watering it two or three times a week with soot tea. Make the concoction with boiling water, from soot taken from the chimney or stove in which wood is burned. When cold, water the bush with it. When it is used up, pour boiling hot water on the soot a second time. ...
— Scientific American, Volume XXXVI., No. 8, February 24, 1877 • Various

... Danny. "And I don't remember anything that would make that. There isn't any little bush or old log or anything underneath it. Perhaps rough Brother North Wind heaped it up, just ...
— The Adventures of Danny Meadow Mouse • Thornton W. Burgess

... known as North Holland, in the district called Kennemerland. It was Dirk III who seized from the bishops of Utrecht some swampy land amidst the channels forming the mouth of the Meuse, which, from the bush which covered it, was named Holt-land (Holland or Wood-land). Here he erected, in 1015, a stronghold to collect tolls from passing ships. This stronghold was the beginning of the town of Dordrecht, and from here a little later ...
— History of Holland • George Edmundson

... QUEENS OF FRANCE. Written in France, carefully compiled from researches made there, commended by the press generally, and published from the Tenth London Edition. It is a truly valuable work for the reader and student of history. By MRS. FORBES BUSH. 2 vols. in one. ...
— Cattle and Their Diseases • Robert Jennings

... "we have been beating about the bush with each other to no purpose; although I know not your name, yet I ...
— Willy Reilly - The Works of William Carleton, Volume One • William Carleton

... said, "Hang it up, ha long are ta baan to talk? aw wonder thi conscience doesn't prick thee!" "Prick me!" he said, "Aw defy owt to prick me when awm laborin' for a gooid cause." Just then he ovver balanced hissel an' fell slap into th' middle ov a whin bush; but he wor up in a crack, an' one o' th' lasses said, "if his conscience hadn't getten prick'd summat else had," an' they went forrard, but Swallow kept his hand under his coit lap for a mile or ...
— Yorkshire Ditties, First Series - To Which Is Added The Cream Of Wit And Humour From His Popular Writings • John Hartley

... upon the 'sugar-bush,' and the bright moon rose high in the bright blue heavens, when the young warrior took down his flute and went out alone, once more to sing the story of his love, the mild breeze gently moved the ...
— Innocents abroad • Mark Twain

... Mabel pointed too but she did not cry out as Cathy had done. And what she pointed at was a big glossy-leaved rhododendron bush, from which a painted pointed paper face peered out very white, very red, in the sunlight and, as the children gazed, shrank back into the ...
— The Enchanted Castle • E. Nesbit

... agreed Bainton, sympathetically— "Such a wife as she'd a' made t'ye, Passon, if she'd been as she was when she come in smilin' an' trippin' across this lawn by your side, an' ye broke off a bit o' your best lilac for her! There's the very bush—all leafless twigs now, but strong an' 'elthy an' ready to bloom again! Ah! I remember that day well!—'twas the same day as ye sat under the apple tree arter she was gone an' fastened a threepenny bit with a 'ole in it to ye're ...
— God's Good Man • Marie Corelli

... also had lost something of his presence of mind, or, at least, of his usual power of conversation. He had brought his daughter out there with the express purpose of saying to her a special word or two; he had beat very wide about the bush with the view of mentioning a certain name; and now that his daughter was there, and the name had been mentioned, it seemed that he hardly ...
— Orley Farm • Anthony Trollope

... tunics. Their skins, not brown nor red nor yellow, but tawny like that of the white man deeply tanned by the sun, reminded me again that these people may trace back their ancestry to the Caucasian cradle. The hair of the women was adorned with gay flowers or the leaves of the false coffee bush. Their single garments of gorgeous colors clung to their straight, rounded bodies, their dark eyes were soft and full of light as the eyes of deer, and their features, clean-cut and severe, were ...
— White Shadows in the South Seas • Frederick O'Brien

... sir," said the witness, well knowing that he had wiped off Grant's morning score in the matter of Bush Walk. ...
— The Postmaster's Daughter • Louis Tracy

... by a sudden rise in the ground. When they gained the road, they too would be hidden by the rising ground between them and the crofter's cottage, whereas now they could be seen distinctly by any one who should happen to look, for there was not even a tree or bush to shield them. Elsie pushed on quickly, not venturing to take even a peep behind until they had safely scrambled down the steep bank into the road, when, to her joy, she found that the stone walls enclosing the croft, even the little ...
— Little Folks (Septemeber 1884) - A Magazine for the Young • Various

... scoundrels happened to be smarter than other people," came a mocking voice from the branch of an oak-tree, and looking up, Robeckal saw the clown, who, with the quickness of an ape, had now slid down the tree and disappeared in the bush. ...
— The Son of Monte-Cristo, Volume II (of 2) • Alexandre Dumas pere

... fabulous treasures, and brought them to Hamburg. Tradition has it that for three days the public executioner stood ankle-deep in the blood of the condemned. Nevertheless, the seafaring public did not suspect the presence of a robber behind every bush or cliff. After all, an undisturbed voyage was the rule rather than the exception; sensational occurrences, of course, then, as now, playing an important part in the ...
— The Great Events by Famous Historians, Volume VI. • Various

... the oriole, as a kind of variation in his own song. The catbird is as shy as the robin is vulgarly familiar. Only when his nest or his fledglings are approached does he become noisy and almost aggressive. I have known him to station his young in a thick cornel-bush on the edge of the raspberry-bed, after the fruit began to ripen, and feed them there for a week or more. In such cases he shows none of that conscious guilt which makes the robin contemptible. On the contrary, ...
— My Garden Acquaintance • James Russell Lowell

... a broker with all you highbrows lining out homers for the girls while I have to sit on the bleachers and score 'em up. If I try to make a hit with the ladies it's a bingle; and it's the bench and the bush-league ...
— The Common Law • Robert W. Chambers

... told me a story down in Kern County last summer. We were riding over the desert and I asked the stage driver the name of a low yellow bush that grows down there. He was an interesting fellow, that stage driver, who had been a buccaroo all his life and apparently knew all about the sage brush country. And when he didn't know he was not lacking in ...
— Vignettes of San Francisco • Almira Bailey

... it's the last act; but don't put all your eggs in one basket, little kid. I know Dr. Ballard's been here, and now you do everything he said, like a good girl, and between the two of 'em they ought to fix you up. I'd pin more faith to a doctor in the hand than to one in the bush a thousand miles ...
— Jewel - A Chapter In Her Life • Clara Louise Burnham

... woods. My road was soon enlarged by another road joining it, coming in from the north and seeming well worn from recent use. I had been walking for nearly a mile when I heard a noise behind me—clearly the noise of horses coming. I lay flat behind a bush which grew by a fallen tree. Three horsemen—rebels—passed, going southward. They passed at a walk, and were talking, but their words could not be distinguished. The middle man was riding a ...
— Who Goes There? • Blackwood Ketcham Benson

... gentleman who is thinking of settling in Canada or Australia, take a labourer's cottage in a distant county—a few pounds will supply one infinitely superior in comfort and healthfulness to the log-cabin of the bush that is to be his ultimate destination—let him take a little land and a bit of garden in a good farming county; engage one farm-servant (unless he has sons able to take his place), and a rough country-girl to do the coarse work of the house. The ladies of the family must, of course, perform ...
— Chambers's Edinburgh Journal, No. 426 - Volume 17, New Series, February 28, 1852 • Various

... satisfied that all would be well. Hugh did not part with his hair till he had joked himself about its length as much as any one could quiz him for it. When he had pulled it down over the end of his nose, and peeped through it, like an owl out of an ivy-bush, he might be supposed to part with it voluntarily, and not because he ...
— The Crofton Boys • Harriet Martineau

... you will take my advice, you will look to some other way of settling this business. You know what a law-suit means in this country, and you'll find yourself in the midst of a strange bush of thorns. ...
— The Impostures of Scapin • Moliere (Poquelin)

... the thought that she was with him and he had eighty pounds a year. Gaily he waved both his hands to her, and she answered with a smile, and then, in his boyishness, he jumped over a gooseberry bush. Immediately afterwards he reddened and tried to look venerable, for while in the air he had caught sight of two women and a man watching him from the dyke. He walked severely to the door, and, again forgetting himself, was bounding ...
— The Little Minister • J.M. Barrie

... afraid of the wrongness that inhabited this muck of house and grove and matted bush. He said this loudly to the prostrate form; then, waiting a little, repeated it. He would smash the print with its fallacious expanse of peace. The broken glass of the smitten picture jingled thinly on the floor. Woolfolk turned suddenly and defeated the purpose ...
— Wild Oranges • Joseph Hergesheimer

... river got its tail entangled in a bush, and could not move. A number of Mosquitoes seeing its plight settled upon it and enjoyed a good meal undisturbed by its tail. A hedgehog strolling by took pity upon the Fox and went up to him: "You are in a bad way, neighbour," said the hedgehog; ...
— Aesop's Fables • Aesop

... our good success, when just at that moment a pistol cracked in the bush, a ball whistled close past my ear and poor Tom Redruth stumbled and fell his length on the ground. Both the squire and I returned the shot, but as we had nothing to aim at, it is probable we only wasted powder. Then we reloaded and turned our ...
— Treasure Island • Robert Louis Stevenson

... variety, and, if they do much, shall change it to Silver Top. You can never tell what a thing named Doolittle will do. The one in the Senate changed color and got sour. They ripen badly—either mildew or rot on the bush. They are apt to Johnsonize—rot on the stem. I shall ...
— Little Masterpieces of American Wit and Humor - Volume I • Various

... appropriated by the host in liquidation of some ancient score. With a shout of rage, or rather a howl, from our Bohemian whip, we again set forward. "Hi, hi, hi!" and helter-skelter we went, through bush and bramble, where indeed there was no trace or shadow of a beaten track. The Bohemian was lost to control; he shouted, he sang, he yelled, savagely flogging his willing beast all the while, until we began to have serious fears for the safety of ...
— A Tramp's Wallet - stored by an English goldsmith during his wanderings in Germany and France • William Duthie

... pony to a bush, he reconnoitred the place, disappearing from sight the moment he entered the chaparral in any direction. Returning at last, with a grave face, he said, "Will Majella let me leave her here for a little time? There is a way, but I can ...
— Ramona • Helen Hunt Jackson

... breezes frolicked up and down the banks of Moose Creek and rasped the surface of its placid pools, swollen still from the heavy rains of the "First." In the glittering sunshine the prairie lay a riot of color; the first wild roses now had faded to a pastel pink, but on every bush there were plenty of new ones, deeply crimson and odorous. Across the creek from Thomas Shouldice's little house, Indian pipes and columbine reddened the edge of the poplar grove, from the lowest branches of which ...
— The Black Creek Stopping-House • Nellie McClung

... path-making; the oversight of labourers becomes a disease; it is quite an effort not to drop into the farmer; and it does make you feel so well. To come down covered with mud and drenched with sweat and rain after some hours in the bush, change, rub down, and take a chair in the verandah, is to taste a quiet conscience. And the strange thing that I mark is this: If I go out and make sixpence, bossing my labourers and plying the cutlass or ...
— Vailima Letters • Robert Louis Stevenson

... Court went into mourning for little Tom Thumb. They buried him under a rose-bush, and raised a nice white marble monument over ...
— Cole's Funny Picture Book No. 1 • Edward William Cole

... a howl and sprang back. The ghost advanced on him. Billy got a light tap, then Sam yelled as something damp brushed his cheek. He did not know that it was the leaf of a bush. He thought it the cold, ...
— The Meadow-Brook Girls Afloat • Janet Aldridge

... so. I ain't deaf. Samson, sprinkle another spadeful of manure on that bridal-wreath bush over thar by ...
— The Miller Of Old Church • Ellen Glasgow

... shows the steeple bush to be closely related to the fleecy, white meadow-sweet, often found growing near. The pink spires, which bloom from the top downward, have pale brown tips where the withered flowers are, ...
— Wild Flowers Worth Knowing • Neltje Blanchan et al

... of some kind from the rain which was beginning to fall. The lane was on the east side of the road, and under the hedge on one hand there was an old ditch overgrown with grass and weeds; here Fan crouched down under a bush until the shower was over, then got out and walked on again. Presently she discovered a gap in the hedge large enough to admit her body, and after peering cautiously through and seeing no person about, she got into the field. It was small, and the hedge all round shut out the view ...
— Fan • Henry Harford

... knowed you'd called him old man Hislop, he'd fire you aout o' the back door mighty suddent. When I see a spry, set up, young feller and a likely heifer of a gal a saunterin' through the bush, sort o' poetical like, daown to the mill, it don't take me two shakes to know that suthin's up. You're a poor, rejected, cast off, cut aout strip ...
— Two Knapsacks - A Novel of Canadian Summer Life • John Campbell

... sir. I'd do my best. I've done bush work in the Hills, and Blue Pete knocked something into ...
— The Return of Blue Pete • Luke Allan

... gray, and full of spottis blake, And on her brest a chorl painted ful even, Bering a bush of thornis on his backe, Whiche for his theft might clime so ...
— Moon Lore • Timothy Harley

... the time had come, a week later, when he must go for a last look at the home that was his no longer. Very slowly he had walked about the yard; pausing a little before each tree and bush and plant; putting forth his hand, at times, to touch them softly as though he would make sure that they were there for he saw them dimly through a mist. The place was strangely hushed and still. The ...
— Their Yesterdays • Harold Bell Wright

... savages now formed a circle round the fire and performed a war dance, with the unlucky trappers for rueful spectators. This done, emboldened by what they considered cowardice on the part of the white men, they neglected their usual mode of bush-fighting, and advanced openly within twenty paces of the willows. A sharp volley from the trappers brought them to a sudden halt, and laid three of them breathless. The chief, who had stationed himself on an eminence to direct all the movements of his people, seeing three of his warriors ...
— The Adventures of Captain Bonneville - Digested From His Journal • Washington Irving

... hill, shouting any nonsense that came into his head. "Here am I," he cried rhythmically, as his feet pounded to the left and to the right, "plunging along, like an elephant in the jungle, stripping the branches as I go (he snatched at the twigs of a bush at the roadside), roaring innumerable words, lovely words about innumerable things, running downhill and talking nonsense aloud to myself about roads and leaves and lights and women coming out into the darkness—about women—about Rachel, about Rachel." He stopped and drew ...
— The Voyage Out • Virginia Woolf

... began to range over the island, if it was such (for we never surrounded it), to search for cattle, and for any of the Indian plantations, for fruits or plants; but they soon found, to their cost, that they were to use more caution than that came to, and that they were to discover perfectly every bush and every tree before they ventured abroad in the country; for about fourteen of our men going farther than the rest, into a part of the country which seemed to be planted, as they thought, for it did but seem so, only ...
— The Life, Adventures & Piracies of the Famous Captain Singleton • Daniel Defoe

... reached his prime in the underworld, of which he also was a native, without touching affluence, until his fortieth year. Nevertheless, he was a travelled man, and no mere nomad of the bush. As a mining expert he had seen much life in South Africa as well as in Western Australia, but at last he was to see more in Europe as a gentleman of means. A wife had no place in his European scheme; a husband was the last thing Rachel wanted; but a long sea voyage, an uncongenial ...
— The Shadow of the Rope • E. W. Hornung

... evening clothes, but he had put on an American dinner-jacket. He and his comrade were strangely agile; their movements were quick, their step was light, like a cat's, and she noted how they lifted their feet. She did not know the prospector gets the habit by walking through tangled bush and across rough stones. They had a suppleness that came from using the long ax, and toil in the wilds had given them a fine-drawn look. In some ways both were modern, but in some they belonged to the past, when the fortress peels were built and the ...
— Partners of the Out-Trail • Harold Bindloss

... enough to conceal a setter dog, and the sable is somewhat larger than our elk. Nevertheless F. insisted that the animal was standing behind it, and that he had caught the toss of its head. We lay still for some time, while the soft, warm rain drizzled down on us, our eyes riveted on the bush. And then we caught the momentary flash of curved horns as the sable tossed his head. It seemed incredible even then that the tiny bush should conceal so large a beast. As a matter of fact we later found that the bush grew on a slight elevation, behind which was ...
— African Camp Fires • Stewart Edward White

... young maiden was sitting on the brink of the ravine, pondering on the old legend and peering down into the deep below. It was not the first time she had found her way hither, where but seldom a human foot had dared to tread. To her every alder and bramble-bush, that clothed the naked wall of the rock, were as familiar as were the knots and veins in the ceiling of the chamber where from her childhood she had slept; and as she sat there on the brink of the precipice, the late summer sun threw its red lustre upon her and upon the fogs that came drifting ...
— Tales From Two Hemispheres • Hjalmar Hjorth Boyesen

... which was always the first thing to strike those who saw her, prided herself on being uncompromised as to her moral character. There are some women who, because they stop short of actual vice, consider themselves irreproachable. They are willing, so to speak, to hang out the bush, but keep no tavern. In former times an appearance of evil was avoided in order to cover evil deeds, but at present there are those who, under the cover of being only "fast," risk ...
— Jacqueline, v2 • Th. Bentzon (Mme. Blanc)

... as if it were only yesterday (1720). I was curious and mischievous. They had put a doll in a rosemary bush for the purpose of making me believe it was the child of which ...
— The Memoirs of the Louis XIV. and The Regency, Complete • Elizabeth-Charlotte, Duchesse d'Orleans

... your hair," persisted the voice, "but your eyes, so wild and strange in their expression, that show the approach of madness. Make your locks as smooth as you like, and add a garland of those scarlet, star-shaped blossoms hanging from the bush behind you—crown yourself as you crowned old Cla-cla—but the crazed look will remain ...
— Green Mansions - A Romance of the Tropical Forest • W. H. Hudson

... said the barber's wife, after beating about the bush for some-time, and with many injunctions to strict secrecy, 'this field belonged to my grandfather, who buried five pots full of gold in it, and we were just trying to discover the exact spot before beginning to dig. You won't tell ...
— Tales Of The Punjab • Flora Annie Steel

... &c. Why is all this, but with the whore in the Proverbs, to intoxicate some or other? oculorum decipulam, [5011]one therefore calls it, et indicem libidinis, the trap of lust, and sure token, as an ivy-bush is to ...
— The Anatomy of Melancholy • Democritus Junior

... 62. VICIA sepium. BUSH VETCH.—Is also a species much eaten by cattle in its wild state, but has not yet been cultivated: it nevertheless would be an acquisition if it could be got to grow ...
— The Botanist's Companion, Vol. II • William Salisbury

... these were quickly negatived by the Australians, who showed themselves no mean masters of craft. Nearly across to the opposite side of the valley were revealed, by the telescope, the shoulders and black face of a dummy sharpshooter located behind a bush. Some distance up the valley, to the north, a piece of iron piping protruded from cover in imitation of a gun. Dummy loopholes abounded. On the slope of Chunuk Bair, a communication trench wound down. At a certain hour of the afternoon a man coming down this trench would, ...
— The 28th: A Record of War Service in the Australian Imperial Force, 1915-19, Vol. I • Herbert Brayley Collett

... "he's up to some mischief, and I know it. Much as I detest him, I'd rather have him in sight than out, just now. He makes me feel like a snake in a bush; if he'd only show his ugly head, or spring his rattle, ...
— A Columbus of Space • Garrett P. Serviss

... watching the spinning top that he fell right over backward on it, and around and around he went, faster and faster, until, all of a sudden, just as when you get off a merry-go-round before it stops moving, that snail was tossed off from the top right out of the window into the mulberry bush, where he belonged, and so he didn't stick Curly with his horns after all. Wasn't ...
— Curly and Floppy Twistytail - The Funny Piggie Boys • Howard R. Garis

... his arrow into the square, but falling short of the enemy, he covered himself with corn and crept thither to regain the arrow, and bore it back in safety, honored with a triumphant yell as he returned. After much of this bush skirmishing, both parties burst into the square. There was unremitted firing and war-whooping, the music of chanting and of the pebbled gourd going all the while. At length the fighters joined in ...
— Continental Monthly , Vol I, Issue I, January 1862 - Devoted to Literature and National Policy • Various

... to an end. It was of no use going back, for there was no house to be seen anywhere. But he was not frightened, for you know Diamond was used to things that were rather out of the way. He threw himself down under a rose-bush, and fell asleep. ...
— At the Back of the North Wind • George MacDonald

... shut in on every side. As he wished to see with his own eyes if the investment was complete, he ordered his troops to fall into rank on the top of the mountain, giving the command to Ravanel and Catinat, and with a pair of pistols in his belt and his carbine on his shoulder, he glided from bush to bush and rock to rock, determined, if any weak spot existed, to discover it; but the information he had received was perfectly correct, ...
— Massacres Of The South (1551-1815) - Celebrated Crimes • Alexandre Dumas, Pere

... House of Lords when the Bill was brought up, and it seems paradoxical, but is true, that though it was on the whole satisfactory, nobody was satisfied. Lord Grey complained to me that Lord Harrowby was too stiff; Lord Harrowby complained that Lord Grey was always beating about the bush of compromise, but never would commit himself fairly to concession. Melbourne complained last night that what was done was done in such an ungracious manner, so niggardly, that he hated the man (Harrowby) who did it. The ultra-Tories are outrageous 'that he gave up everything without ...
— The Greville Memoirs - A Journal of the Reigns of King George IV and King William IV, Vol. II • Charles C. F. Greville

... you please, I am here, and I am the first little pig," came the answer, and out from behind the bush stepped a cute little piggie boy, with a bundle of ...
— Uncle Wiggily and Old Mother Hubbard - Adventures of the Rabbit Gentleman with the Mother Goose Characters • Howard R. Garis

... horizon of the gray, cloudy sky. At his left extended the flat, dull-brown coast line, which seemed to be lower than the turbid waves of the restless sea. The cold morning wind was blowing light mists over the absolutely barren shore. Not a tree, not a bush, not a human dwelling was to be seen in this dreary wilderness. Wherever the eye turned, there was nothing but sand and water, which united at the edge of the land. Long lines of surf poured over the arid desert, and, as if repelled by the desolation of this strand, ...
— Uarda • Georg Ebers

... another's hands. My country is closed against me; I shall never see it more. I am named a rebel, and chained to this soil, this dull and sluggish land, where from year's end to year's end the key keeps the house and the furze bush keeps the cow. The best years of my manhood—years in which I should have acquired honor—have gone from me here. There was a man of my name amongst those gentlemen, old officers of Dundee, who in France did not disdain to serve as private ...
— Audrey • Mary Johnston

... ascertained from the teacher the direction to the spot on which the battle was to be fought, and after a walk of two hours, reached it. The summit of a bare hill was the place chosen; for, unlike most of the other islanders, who are addicted to bush-fighting, those of Mango are in the habit of meeting on open ground. We arrived before the two parties had commenced the deadly struggle, and creeping as close up as we dared among the rocks, we ...
— The Coral Island • R.M. Ballantyne

... white-capp'd waves of Michigan break On the beach where the jacksnipes croon— The breeze sweeps in from the purple lake And tempers the heat of noon: In yonder bush, where the berries grow, The Peewee tunefully sings, While hither and thither the people go, Attending to matters ...
— Eugene Field, A Study In Heredity And Contradictions - Vol. I • Slason Thompson

... Victoria,) we had three bad boggy brooks to cross; besides a great deal of cutting to do with axes in order to open the road; and many bad ravines and gullies to render passable. To make a bridge, across a boggy stream, with no other material than the short, knotty, hard and crooked chaparral bush, was no easy matter. The first day's march was about ten miles—we encamped about sunset after a ...
— Company 'A', corps of engineers, U.S.A., 1846-'48, in the Mexican war • Gustavus Woodson Smith

... apprehension in order to conceal the direction of her flight. The other remained, however, and even moved a few steps nearer to Kai Lung, as though encouraged by his appearance, so that he was able to regard her varying details more appreciably. As she advanced she plucked a red blossom from a thorny bush, and from time to time she shortened the broken stalk between her ...
— Kai Lung's Golden Hours • Ernest Bramah

... lighted lamp awaited me when I came here. The black smudges of smoke left by many a forgotten evening lamp stare, like blind eyes, from the wall. Fireflies flit in the bush near the dried-up pond, and bamboo branches fling their shadows on the grass-grown path. I am the guest of no one at the end of my day. The long night is before me, and I ...
— The Gardener • Rabindranath Tagore

... maiden. And he said, "I have punished myself by my folly; the light of the morning is taken out of the day. I must go on alone till my journey shall draw towards its end." Then he spake the word, and a laurel came up on the bank where Daphne had plunged into the stream; and the green bush with its thick clustering leaves ...
— Museum of Antiquity - A Description of Ancient Life • L. W. Yaggy

... painting their faces black and red, tying eagle feathers in their long hair, or plastering it on their temples with a compound of vermilion and glue. They were excellent woodsmen, skilful hunters, and perhaps the best bush-fighters in all Canada. ...
— Montcalm and Wolfe • Francis Parkman

... by limiting the size and scope of government. Under the leadership of Vice President Bush, we have reduced the growth of Federal regulations by more than 25 percent and cut well over 300 million hours of government-required paperwork each year. This will save the public more than $150 billion ...
— Complete State of the Union Addresses from 1790 to the Present • Various

... fate austere The impulse to discard, He never paused to idly veer About the bush; but calm and clear He said: 'How ...
— 'That Very Mab' • May Kendall and Andrew Lang

... wanderer's daughter who made the place my paradise. She was a tall, largely made girl, of a dark favour, with eyes of black fire, and with a warm, Spanish kind of skin, olive-toned with rich reds under, and the whitest, wonderfullest teeth, and a bush of black hair that was a marvel. She would let it down often enough, and it hung about her body till it reached the back of her knees. Lord knows who her mother was. I never knew, and she said she ...
— Marjorie • Justin Huntly McCarthy

... word. If the rascal takes the cars, send me word. If he beats about the bush until night, be on your guard, especially in lonely places; the desperado is capable ...
— File No. 113 • Emile Gaboriau

... would—those English horses have the best barrels in the world, and they are pretty to look at, but no legs. Why, 120 miles is a decent run here; rough work through the bush too, but then soft as tan—no hard roads like in the ...
— The Confessions of a Caricaturist, Vol 2 (of 2) • Harry Furniss

... years had conned their Bibles in secret; and thus his preaching was like unto oil on a smouldering fire, and stirred to vigorous life once more what had slumbered for a hundred years since the fatal Day of Blood. He tramped the valleys of Moravia; he was known as the Bush Preacher, and was talked of in every market-place; the shepherds sang old Brethren's hymns on the mountains; a new spirit breathed upon the old dead bones; and thus, through the message of this simple man, there began in Moravia a hot revival of Protestant zeal and hope. It was soon ...
— History of the Moravian Church • J. E. Hutton

... I'm glad you've got the pluck to say so. I knew that from the first. You're a lot too clever for spinning, really. You'd shine anywhere. Let's sit here under this thorn bush. I must get some rabbiting over this scrub. The place swarms with them. You don't ...
— The Spinners • Eden Phillpotts

... Tree, bush, and flower grow and blossom upon either side; and a little bird, with a throat like a thrush, warbles a canticle of exquisite musical modulations, so to speak. But the most stirring sight of all is the system ...
— The Lake of the Sky • George Wharton James

... in my business I am. To see people—I'll name no names—to see other people purred over, and then to find your own craft treated as just a commonplace of Nature, no more wonderful than the leaves on a bush—beastly, I call it." ...
— The Spinners • Eden Phillpotts

... owner silently but surely dogged his every footstep; and when the tree was reached at last Manners lay wearily down at its foot, fully resolved not to depart from thence until he had brought matters to a crisis. At the same moment the figure of a young man glided stealthily into the cover of a bush within a few yards of where the other lay. Manners was not aware of the fact; he had neither seen nor heard his pursuer, and in happy ignorance of the circumstance he awaited ...
— Heiress of Haddon • William E. Doubleday

... degree. No one could say of him that all his life long he did else than bear his convictions boldly emblazoned on his shield. There could never be any doubt of what he thought. He could not beat about the bush in his beliefs—he would not keep them secret—he did not care for unpopularity in the least. His great aim was to fight—at whatever odds— for whatever he felt by dogged conviction. He was often wrong; but never cowardly, ...
— Memoir and Letters of Francis W. Newman • Giberne Sieveking

... put their nose into a furze-bush, Muster Smith, they have. We've got our posse-commontaturs, fourteen men, sir, as'll play the whole vale to cricket, and whap them; and every one'll fight, for they're half poachers themselves, you see' (and Harry winked and chuckled); 'and they ...
— Yeast: A Problem • Charles Kingsley

... all. Not far from the fence, by a corner of the garden, stood a low bush. She could smell its sweet ...
— Clematis • Bertha B. Cobb

... histories of Socrates, Sozomen and Theodoret; and amongst the moderns, Erasmus, Cave, Lardner and Tillemont, with the church history of Neander, and his monograph on the Life and Times of Chrysostom, translated by J.C. Stapleton. More recent are the lives by W.R.W. Stephens (London, 1871), R.W. Bush (London, 1885) and A. Peuch (Paris, 1891). F.W. Farrar's romance Gathering Clouds gives a good picture of the man and his times. For monographs on special points such as Chrysostom's theological position and his preaching, see the very full bibliography in E. Preuschen's article in Herzog-Hauck's ...
— Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 6, Slice 3 - "Chitral" to "Cincinnati" • Various

... would have been a smart confederate who could have surprised the Michiganders that night. Every faculty was on the alert. Often we fancied that an enemy was approaching the line; a foe lurked behind every tree and bush; each sound had an ominous meaning and the videttes were visited at frequent intervals to see if they had discovered anything. In that way the night passed. In the morning everybody was exhausted and, ...
— Personal Recollections of a Cavalryman - With Custer's Michigan Cavalry Brigade in the Civil War • J. H. (James Harvey) Kidd

... replied the Cuckoo, "bigger than this by lots, and with tree-ferns up in the bush. This isn't bad, though, as far as it goes. What's that place over ...
— For the Sake of the School • Angela Brazil

... My ma tell me to run; but I ain't think they'd hurt me. I see 'em come down de street—all of 'em on horses. Oo—h, dey wuz a heap of 'em! I couldn't count 'em. My daddy run to de woods—he an' de other men. Dey ran right to de graveyard. Too mucha bush been dere. You couldn't see 'em. Stay in de ...
— Slave Narratives: a Folk History of Slavery in the United States From Interviews with Former Slaves • Works Projects Administration

... righteousness, even according to the degree or clearness of the sight of faith. 7. The bow is of that nature, as to make whatever you shall look upon through it, to be of the same colour of itself, whether that thing be bush, or man, or beast; and the righteousness of Christ is that that makes sinners, when God looks upon them through it, to look beautiful, and acceptable in his sight, for we are made comely through ...
— The Works of John Bunyan • John Bunyan

... by stress of circumstances, as good Irishmen as I ever met. Coming home from work one evening, I met on the road to the Curragh a party of them, carrying, for want of a better banner, a big green bush, and singing "The Green Flag." Then, as they came in sight of the famous plain itself, a man ...
— The Life Story of an Old Rebel • John Denvir

... the thickly growing thorn bushes ranged to the height of four feet, making it incumbent upon us to continually assume a stooping position when walking, involving a crick in the back for a good part of the time while there, but the bush was as thick as could be and formed an ...
— S.O.S. Stand to! • Reginald Grant

... the door they stopped again, and presently he held out his hand to say good-bye. The way he did it, the way he looked at her made me just know, and I got right down on my knees under the lilac-bush, and when he'd gone I sang, "Praise God, from whom all blessings flow." Sang ...
— Mary Cary - "Frequently Martha" • Kate Langley Bosher

... stop me in—in that way. Look here, old fellow; it's no use beating about the bush. I believe she ...
— Father Stafford • Anthony Hope

... history and has been painted by artists. In the homely chronicles of the Southwest its thorns stick, its roots burn into bright coals, its trunks make fence posts, its lovely leaves wave. To live beside this beautiful, often pernicious, always interesting and highly characteristic tree—or bush—and to know nothing of its significance is to be cheated out of a part of life. It is but one of a thousand factors peculiar to the Southwest and ...
— Guide to Life and Literature of the Southwest • J. Frank Dobie

... fire of dry bush alight, and under the influence of its heat they got two or three of the oysters open. Each of the boys swallowed one—then they looked at ...
— The Pirate Shark • Elliott Whitney

... numbers of youths, of all ages, and all characters. At first he was shy and observant, but this soon wore off, and he became a favourite. Nobody was more liked at any time, and he was completely unrivalled in the play-ground. He could set all the boys in a roar of laughter, when, hid behind a bush, he would bark so like a dog that the unhappy wights who were not in the secret expected to see a vicious hound spring out upon them, and took to their heels in fright. He was first in every attempt at acting, which the boys got up; and there ...
— The Fairy Godmothers and Other Tales • Mrs. Alfred Gatty

... the mountain sides, sometimes with the sun blazing full above us, sometimes shaded by the light foliage of the albizzias, until we reached a rough stone monument which marked the highest point. In the higher ranges we sometimes came upon a piece of bush with the tall rosamala trees still standing; or caught a glimpse of wide plains, bounded in the far-off distance ...
— A Visit to Java - With an Account of the Founding of Singapore • W. Basil Worsfold

... up, and found that the wonderful field had vanished, and that he was lying under the old pecan-tree instead of the 'possum-bush; and there was his mother shouting ...
— St. Nicholas Magazine for Boys and Girls, Vol. 5, May, 1878, No. 7. - Scribner's Illustrated • Various

... over-arching trees. Here, all the clouds of sunset stood, caught up in burning gold. Even as I paused, dazzled a moment by the sudden radiance, from height to height the wild bright rose of evening ran. Not a tottering stone, black, well-nigh shapeless with age, not a green bush, but seemed to dwell unconsumed in its own fire above this desolate ground. The trees that grew around me—willow and yew, thorn and poplar—were but flaming cages for the wild birds that perched ...
— Henry Brocken - His Travels and Adventures in the Rich, Strange, Scarce-Imaginable Regions of Romance • Walter J. de la Mare

... sea was a deep blue now, with crests of foam; the island coast opposite was a shadowy streak stretched across the feet of the sun. Oh, it was beautiful to stand at that open window in the freshness, listening to the robin on the bare lilac bush a few yards away, to the quarrelling of the impudent sparrows on the path below, to the wind in the branches of the trees, to all the happy morning sounds of nature. A joyous feeling took possession of her heart, a sudden ...
— The Benefactress • Elizabeth Beauchamp

... to the right, it slopes down gently to the valley and is very thick and partly impenetrable. There can therefore have been no two courses open to him. He would look for a likely place to the right. Let us start here, and first take a small circle, examining every bush carefully. The body may have easily been pushed in beneath a thicket and well ...
— The Czar's Spy - The Mystery of a Silent Love • William Le Queux

... unusually gross Persian book, called the "Al-Namah" because all questions begin with "Al" (the Arab article) contains one "Al-Wajib al-busidan?" (what best deserves bussing?) and the answer is "Kus-i-nau-pashm," (a bobadilla with a young bush). ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 1 • Richard F. Burton

... Terry, under his breath, and we crept softly toward the wall, taking advantage of the shadow of every bush and tree. He had been foresighted enough to mark the very spot, only a scratch of stone on stone, but we could see to read in that light. For anchorage there was a tough, fair-sized shrub close ...
— Herland • Charlotte Perkins Stetson Gilman

... point, about two miles from the village, and surround it, and then wait till daylight. You can do it easily enough with thirty men, as it lies at the foot of the mountain, and there is no escape for the beggars unless they break through you and get into the bush. Be guided by the Fiji boy; and, as the Yankees say, 'no one wants a brass band with him when he's going duck-hunting,' so try and surround the village as quietly as possible. I'll see that none of them get away in their ...
— "Martin Of Nitendi"; and The River Of Dreams - 1901 • Louis Becke

... had taken his bow and a quiver of arrows, and while Pocahontas and Cleopatra were sporting at the waterfall he had sought a pond whose surface was all but covered with fragrant water lilies, and he had hidden behind a sumac, bush, waiting patiently till a buck came down alone to drink. Only one arrow did he spend, which found its place between the wide branched antlers; then the hunter had waded into the pond, pushing aside the lily pads, and with one cut of his knife he ...
— The Princess Pocahontas • Virginia Watson

... that he always kep' a lot on hand to oblige his customers. I will say for him that it seemed to me he give Gracie an amazin' big five dollars' worth, and when he come to make the change he handed out a ten-dollar gold piece, or what I then took to be such, as easy as if he'd found it growin' on a bush, and said nothin' whatever about the premium on it. Perhaps I'd ought to have mentioned it, but it seemed to me it was his business more'n mine: so I jest took it as if it was the most natural thing in life, and he went off. I thought I might as well ...
— Lippincott's Magazine, August, 1885 • Various

... got there?" he said, as he began to pull upon a bush with green leaves yet clinging to its twigs. In five minutes more he knew where the Nez Perces had made their hasty "cache" for their lodges and other treasures, and he went at once to report it to his father and to Yellow Pine. The latter looked at Sile with ...
— Two Arrows - A Story of Red and White • William O. Stoddard

... with gold and silver, held together her trailing white robes of India muslin, trimmed with Valenciennes, and a narrow scarlet ribbon encircled her throat like a line of blood. The sunlight, filtering through the leaves, flickered upon her dress and clear, dark cheeks, while, near by, a bush of yellow roses flung its fragrance upon the air. The only sound in the garden was the gentle rustle of the trees, which recalled to her the distant murmur of the sea. Gradually she entirely forgot Michel, and thought only of the happy moments of the previous day, of the ...
— Prince Zilah, Complete • Jules Claretie

... to her hand, and one word in her ear— When they reached the hall door, where the charger stood near; So light to the croup the fair lady he swung, So light to the saddle before her he sprung!— "She is won!—we are gone, over bank, bush, and scaur; They'll have fleet steeds that follow!" ...
— The American Union Speaker • John D. Philbrick

... sat down behind a bush and laughed joyously. The eager, appealing look in the lad's eyes went to his heart. What was a goldfish or two? A fish has no feeling—not even a goldfish. There was ...
— Truxton King - A Story of Graustark • George Barr McCutcheon

... drawing back from her penitent clasp; but Mrs. Fisher went on with her usual directness: "Look here, Lily, don't let's beat about the bush: half the trouble in life is caused by pretending there isn't any. That's not my way, and I can only say I'm thoroughly ashamed of myself for following the other women's lead. But we'll talk of that by and bye—tell me ...
— House of Mirth • Edith Wharton

... but this one was composed of hard-packed earth and stones in which plants struggled for survival. It was more like smooth clay. Then, as the desert rose from smooth plain to mountains, the ground became simply broken rock, sparsely dotted with creosote bush and cholla. ...
— The Scarlet Lake Mystery • Harold Leland Goodwin

... as that of a bridegroom before marriage. Although the clergy, the military, and others gave him no reputation for knowledge, he knew well his mother's Latin, and spoke it correctly without waiting to be asked. Latterly the Parisians had taught him to walk uprightly, not to beat the bush for others, to measure his passions by the rule of his revenues, not to let them take his leather to make other's shoes, to trust no one farther then he could see them, never to say what he did, and always to do what ...
— Droll Stories, Volume 3 • Honore de Balzac

... This picking off of officers has always seemed to me the savagest of war's barbarities. How Richard divined my thought and purpose, I know not; but when I would have slipped down to Yeates's holly bush he laid a ...
— The Master of Appleby • Francis Lynde

... in heaven, I hope and believe; her body rests in Llanfach churchyard, under the large hawthorn bush ...
— Gladys, the Reaper • Anne Beale

... house-ivy for sentiment! She has only to apply at my former hotel, La Clef de Surete. And gay as a hunchback who's just drowned his wife! Gautruche, called Gogo-la-Gaiete, egad! A pretty fellow who knows what's what, who doesn't beat about the bush, a good old body who takes things easy and who won't give himself the colic with that fishes' grog!" With that he took a bottle of water that stood beside him and hurled it twenty yards away. "Long live the walls! They're the same to papa that the sky is to the good ...
— Germinie Lacerteux • Edmond and Jules de Goncourt

... to the district of Shepherd's Bush and the Uxbridge Road, known in the section of its course between Notting Hill High Street and Uxbridge Road Station as Holland Park Avenue—a fact of which probably none but the residents are aware. ...
— The Kensington District - The Fascination of London • Geraldine Edith Mitton

... as I was going on to say, after he had beat the bush all around among the young birds, leaving several of them wounded on the ground-you understand this sort of thing-he took to the older ones, and set them polishing up their feathers. And having set several very respectable families by the ears, and created a terrible flutter among a number ...
— Justice in the By-Ways - A Tale of Life • F. Colburn Adams

... to select a bush whose branches were long enough to form a canopy over his head when bent, and the ends thrust into the ground. The completing of this exhausted him greatly, but after a rest he resumed his labours. The next thing was to light a fire—a comfort ...
— The Dog Crusoe and His Master - A Story of Adventure in the Western Prairies • Robert Michael Ballantyne

... understand that, lad. At night all the sounds of a tropical forest seem mysterious and weird, but in the broad daylight the bush will be comparatively still. The nocturnal animals will slink away to their lairs, and there will seem nothing strange to you in the songs and calls of the birds. I should recommend you all to take a sound dose of quinine tonight; I have a ...
— Among Malay Pirates - And Other Tales Of Adventure And Peril • G. A. Henty

... ask all these questions so immediately it is to save my son disagreeables which he might not foresee. Sometimes there are debts, embarrassing liabilities, what not! And a legatee finds himself in an inextricable thorn bush. After all, I am not the heir—but I think first of ...
— The Works of Guy de Maupassant, Volume VIII. • Guy de Maupassant

... she went again to the end of the room. Her hair, not long, but thick, like a bundle of silken flax, lay motionless on her narrow shoulders; her pendent hands seemed like two rose-buds falling from a bush. She stood again for a moment before the clump of green plants, then went around it and hid beyond the thickest palms at the window. Outside the window was the darkness of a winter evening, relieved somewhat by snow which covered the broad ...
— The Argonauts • Eliza Orzeszko (AKA Orzeszkowa)

... entered my mind by the eyes, nor, when I brooded over tales of terror, and fancied new and yet more frightful embodiments of horror, did I shudder at any imaginable spectacle, or tremble lest the fancy should become fact, and from behind the whin-bush or the elder-hedge should glide forth the tall swaying form of the Boneless. When alone in bed, I used to lie awake, and look out into the room, peopling it with the forms of all the persons who had died within the scope ...
— The Portent & Other Stories • George MacDonald

... lost any clothes?" he asked, holding a bundle up in his hand. "I found these by the side of the road. I noticed them hanging on a blackberry bush." ...
— The Tale of Old Dog Spot • Arthur Scott Bailey

... a peasant is like a stone by the wayside. I know everything here by heart. I have moved every clod of earth with my own hands; now you say: sell and go elsewhere. Wherever I went I should be dazed and lost; when I looked at a bush I should say: that did not grow at home; the soil would be different and even the sun would not set in the same place. And what should I tell my father if he were to come looking for me when it gets too hot for him in ...
— Selected Polish Tales • Various

... usual luck!" he answered mournfully. "But I was tellin' how you notify the Masai police to go to hell, an' they oblige. It's the last obligin' anybody does for you. Every native's a bush telegraph—every sleepy-seemin' one of 'em! They know tracks in an' out through the scrub that ain't on maps, an' they get past you day or night wi'out you knowin' it, an' word goes on ahead o' you—procedes you as the sayin' is. You come to a village. You need milk, ...
— The Ivory Trail • Talbot Mundy

... is another species of juniper, which is a low bush, like the kind common in the north of Europe. Its branches and leaves have an agreeable smell, and are used ...
— An Account of The Kingdom of Nepal • Fancis Buchanan Hamilton

... Windsor park, or forest, for I am not quite sure of the boundary which separates them. The first was the lovely sight of the hawthorn in full bloom. I had always thought of the hawthorn as a pretty shrub, growing in hedges; as big as a currant bush or a barberry bush, or some humble plant of that character. I was surprised to see it as a tree, standing by itself, and making the most delicious roof a pair of young lovers could imagine to sit under. It looked at a little distance like a young apple-tree covered with ...
— Our Hundred Days in Europe • Oliver Wendell Holmes

... Bethell, of the Phoenix, had many who had "never seen a gun fired in their lives"; [Footnote: Admiralty Records 1. 1490—Capt. Bethell, 21 Aug. 1759.] and Adams, of the Bird-in-hand, learnt the fallacy of the assertion that that rara avis is worth two in the bush. Mustered for drill in small-arms, his men "knew no more how to handle them than a child." [Footnote: Admiralty Records 1. 1440—Capt. Adams, 7 Oct. 1744.] For all their knowledge of that useful exercise ...
— The Press-Gang Afloat and Ashore • John R. Hutchinson

... sorry for it, lass; I never guessed about the pain, though I might have thought of it, sweet soul; but I knew she was married to a very rich man. I was poor, so poor as to know what hunger meant, I thought she could do without me. I went up into the bush and stayed there until I had made my fortune. After a time I got accustomed to knowing that every one in England would think me dead. I used to laugh in my sleeve at the surprise I meant to give Daisy when I walked in rich some ...
— How It All Came Round • L. T. Meade

... which only an accomplished scout is capable. Fortunately the fire was near the edge of a thicket, from which he could hear, but it took him a long time to gain the position he wished, creeping forward, inch by inch, and careful not to make a bush or ...
— The Keepers of the Trail - A Story of the Great Woods • Joseph A. Altsheler

... riff-raff is at all times seeking refuge in it or passing through it, that polyglot swindlers of every kind, the most refined as well as the most commonplace, abound, and that Anarchists are not yet an extinct species. For the Prussian police, moreover, there is a Social Democrat behind every bush. ...
— William of Germany • Stanley Shaw

... city. It grows on a weak and feeble plant, somewhat like vines, which is unable to support itself without props or stakes. It much resembles ivy, and in like manner creeps up and embraces such trees as it grows near. This tree, or bush rather, throws out numerous branches of two or three spans long, having leaves like those of the Syrian apple, but somewhat thicker. On every twig there hang six clusters about the size of dates, and of the colour of unripe grapes, but thicker ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Volume VII • Robert Kerr

... One—two things Clare was instinctively resolved upon: to be married at Michaelmas, and not to have Molly at Ashcombe. But she smiled as sweetly as if the plan proposed was the most charming project in the world, while all the time her poor brains were beating about in every bush for the reasons or excuses of which she should make use at some future time. Molly, however, saved her all this trouble. It was a question which of the three was the most surprised by the words which burst out of her lips. She did not mean to speak, but her heart was ...
— Wives and Daughters • Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell

... women and children, with a guard of some twenty old warriors and youths, were started southward, to be entirely out of the zone of danger. They had instructions to erect temporary shelter and construct a protecting BOMA of thorn bush; for the plan of campaign which Tarzan had chosen was one which might stretch out over many days, or even weeks, during which time the warriors would not ...
— The Return of Tarzan • Edgar Rice Burroughs

... not to court repulse from her husband. Accordingly he went round into the street at the back that he knew so well, entered the garden, and came quietly into the house through the kitchen, temporarily depositing the bird and cage under a bush outside, to lessen the ...
— The Mayor of Casterbridge • Thomas Hardy

... my mother, and the rest, I sacrificed upon a day to gain beginning blest, 20 And to the King of Heavenly folk was slaying on the shore A glorious bull: at hand by chance a mound at topmost bore A cornel-bush and myrtle stiff with shafts close set around: Thereto I wend and strive to pluck a green shoot from the ground, That I with leafy boughs thereof may clothe the altars well; When lo, a portent terrible and marvellous to tell! For the first stem that from the ...
— The AEneids of Virgil - Done into English Verse • Virgil

... said the Father. "Rocky and bare, scarce a bush for a bird or grass for a cricket. Ah, verily he shall love God dearly or hate the world mortally who of free will chooses a ...
— The Prince of India - Or - Why Constantinople Fell - Volume 1 • Lew. Wallace

... strewn with dead leaves. It supported the fir which Bobby always called the "Christmas Tree," and under whose wide low branches he could crawl as into a dusty, cobwebby house; and the little birch tree with its silver bark; and the big round lilac bush, now bare, but in summer the fragrant haunt of birds and butterflies innumerable; and the round flower bed; and the horse-chestnut tree whose inedible brown-and-yellow nuts were just right to throw or to string into necklaces; ...
— The Adventures of Bobby Orde • Stewart Edward White

... sometimes happens, he exchanges the darkness of his ivy bush for the rays of the sun at noon-day, his presence is looked upon as indicative of bad luck to the beholder. Hence it not infrequently happens that a mortal is as much scared by one of these occasional flights as the small bird denizens of the tree ...
— Notes & Queries, No. 41, Saturday, August 10, 1850 • Various

... wildcats, coyote, and bear to him, I thought he was romancing. Going along the trail, he would stop and say, "Ineja teway—bjum—metchi bi wi," or "This is good rabbit ground." Then crouching behind a suitable bush as a blind, he would place the fingers of his right hand against his lips and, going through the act of kissing, he produced a plaintive squeak similar to that given by a rabbit caught by a hawk or in mortal distress. This he repeated with heartrending appeals until suddenly one or two ...
— Hunting with the Bow and Arrow • Saxton Pope

... any way at all; I'm striking right out from the shoulder. There isn't time for beating round the bush! I'm pleading for the good name and honorable position of a perfectly innocent, a fine, woman, and for the reputation and unimpeded career of her son! And I make that appeal as man to man ...
— The Climbers - A Play in Four Acts • Clyde Fitch



Words linked to "Bush" :   caper, Chilean nut, creosote bush, Brugmansia sanguinea, Chilean hazelnut, Cytesis proliferus, raspberry bush, bean trefoil, blueberry, candlewood, firethorn, render, Chilopsis linearis, chaparral broom, bracelet wood, dog hobble, Christ's-thorn, crepe gardenia, flannel bush, glandular Labrador tea, Guevina heterophylla, coville, chaparral pea, Conradina glabra, daphne, mountain fetterbush, joint fir, coralberry, Dacridium laxifolius, eggplant bush, cranberry heath, Hazardia cana, cherry laurel, Brassaia actinophylla, barberry, Leitneria floridana, false azalea, cotton, Francoa ramosa, Codiaeum variegatum, Cordyline terminalis, leucothoe, chanar, crepe flower, Chamaedaphne calyculata, hovea, Jew-bush, Chile hazel, bush hibiscus, Cercis occidentalis, Desmodium motorium, Brazilian potato tree, Japanese angelica tree, bush bean, hollygrape, Georgia bark, Cytisus ramentaceus, Larrea tridentata, Benjamin bush, catclaw, flame pea, cotton-seed tree, Diervilla sessilifolia, bramble bush, East Indian rosebay, Baccharis viminea, cassava, Ilex cornuta, carissa, fuchsia, California beauty, rosebush, Lyonia ligustrina, cinquefoil, American spicebush, crystal tea, allspice, kudu lily, laurel cherry, huckleberry, Madagascar plum, cushion flower, coyote bush, bush nasturtium, andromeda, Hakea lissosperma, Indian rhododendron, Christmasberry, leatherleaf, elder, Mahonia aquifolium, daisy-bush, alpine azalea, Lycium carolinianum, bush shrike, makomako, blueberry root, Eryngium maritimum, black bead, gastrolobium, devil's walking stick, Jacquinia armillaris, lavender cotton, furze, saltbush, Kolkwitzia amabilis, Aralia spinosa, Croton tiglium, honeysuckle, Chile nut, shrub, silverbush, European cranberrybush, capsicum pepper plant, Japanese allspice, lavender, common flat pea, leadwort, false tamarisk, Flacourtia indica, highbush cranberry, Jacquinia keyensis, day jessamine, Halimodendron halodendron, bush vetch, cat's-claw, Halimodendron argenteum, Biscutalla laevigata, silver-bush, buckler mustard, crape jasmine, black haw, Baccharis pilularis, bush tit, hiccough nut, fire thorn, Aralia stipulata, Hibiscus farragei, African hemp, Gaultheria shallon, Aralia elata, Astroloma humifusum, Anagyris foetida, Caulophyllum thalictrioides, Dalea spinosa, Japan allspice, coral bush, kali, buddleia, feijoa, Leiophyllum buxifolium, hoary golden bush, Malosma laurina, bush jacket, bridal-wreath, buckthorn, Aspalathus linearis, quince bush, corkwood tree, bushing, flat pea, elderberry bush, guinea gold vine, scarlet bush, heath, provide, Acocanthera venenata, Datura arborea, Fabiana imbricata, laurel sumac, columnea, cranberry tree, American angelica tree, Acocanthera oblongifolia, Anthyllis barba-jovis, Kiggelaria africana, lilac, clianthus, ringworm bush, dombeya, Adenium multiflorum, hiccup nut, Codariocalyx motorius, Kochia scoparia, blolly, five-finger, George W. Bush, Chilean rimu, hydrangea, Combretum bracteosum, kapuka, arrow wood, kelpwort, crepe myrtle, boysenberry bush, Heteromeles arbutifolia, governor plum, Euonymus americanus, angel's trumpet, currant bush, barilla, Grewia asiatica, Cycloloma atriplicifolium, butterfly flower, derris, leatherwood, alpine totara, abelia, maleberry, Ledum palustre, joewood, German tamarisk, blackthorn, Canella-alba, fool's huckleberry, pepper bush, honeyflower, chanal, Christmas bush, Aristotelia racemosa, pubic hair, consumption weed, bush lawyer, Dirca palustris, stagger bush, cotoneaster, cajan pea, Japanese andromeda, Indian currant, Lyonia mariana, Hakea laurina, crowberry, Lepidothamnus fonkii, George Bush, caricature plant, Erythroxylon coca, bearberry, holly-leaves barberry, Chimonanthus praecox, Irish gorse, hediondilla, bristly locust, ligneous plant, horsebean, Datura suaveolens, marmalade bush, Erythroxylon truxiuense, Chiococca alba, banksia, lomatia, mimosa bush, capsicum, Caulophyllum thalictroides, coca, crampbark, bladder senna, Lepidothamnus laxifolius, spice bush, Lyonia lucida, Comptonia peregrina, Christmas berry, Graptophyllum pictum, Australian heath, Embothrium coccineum, Canella winterana, hawthorn, castor bean plant, Cestrum nocturnum, dusty miller, Adenium obesum, bird's-eye bush, Dubyuh, supply, barbasco, Adam's apple, Jerusalem thorn, dewberry bush, casava, Argyroxiphium sandwicense, Leucothoe fontanesiana, Diervilla lonicera, gorse, kidney wort, coyote brush, greasewood, chalice vine, flowering shrub, juneberry, male berry, Dalmatian laburnum, currant, Cineraria maritima, dhal, Cestrum diurnum, cannabis, bush baby, catjang pea, Chrysolepis sempervirens, guelder rose, bush willow, gooseberry, Lysiloma sabicu, cotton plant, amorpha, caragana, guinea flower, Ledum groenlandicum, Acocanthera oppositifolia, Lindera benzoin, butterfly bush, glasswort, Leycesteria formosa, dahl, rabbit bush, Loiseleuria procumbens, flowering quince, groundsel tree, Epigaea repens, Aspalathus cedcarbergensis, bitter pea, bridal wreath, dog laurel, Benzoin odoriferum, boxwood, glory pea, fire bush, honey-flower, Colutea arborescens, European cranberry bush, flannelbush, Bauhinia monandra, guava bush, belvedere, Lupinus arboreus, camelia, Chilean firebush, Catha edulis, Camellia sinensis, broom, indigo, coronilla, Brugmansia suaveolens, gooseberry bush, Batis maritima, feijoa bush, huckleberry oak, flowering hazel, boxthorn, minniebush, castor-oil plant, sweet pepperbush, Comptonia asplenifolia, crepe jasmine, box, croton, calliandra, impala lily, bryanthus, fever tree, fetter bush, he-huckleberry, Apalachicola rosemary, fringe bush, Brunfelsia americana, Dovyalis caffra, Griselinia littoralis, bean caper, groundsel bush, geebung, Jupiter's beard, climbing hydrangea, beauty bush, kalmia, high-bush blueberry, bitter-bark, governor's plum, blackberry bush, Ardisia escallonoides, Eriodictyon californicum, lotus tree, kei apple



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