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Bush   /bʊʃ/   Listen
Bush

noun
1.
A low woody perennial plant usually having several major stems.  Synonym: shrub.
2.
A large wilderness area.
3.
Dense vegetation consisting of stunted trees or bushes.  Synonyms: chaparral, scrub.
4.
43rd President of the United States; son of George Herbert Walker Bush (born in 1946).  Synonyms: Dubya, Dubyuh, George Bush, George W. Bush, George Walker Bush, President Bush, President George W. Bush.
5.
United States electrical engineer who designed an early analogue computer and who led the scientific program of the United States during World War II (1890-1974).  Synonym: Vannevar Bush.
6.
Vice president under Reagan and 41st President of the United States (born in 1924).  Synonyms: George Bush, George H.W. Bush, George Herbert Walker Bush, President Bush.
7.
Hair growing in the pubic area.  Synonyms: crotch hair, pubic hair.



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"Bush" Quotes from Famous Books



... the lotus of the Nile, described in the 2nd book, as well as from the lotus in the East. Lindley records the conjecture that the article referred to by Herodotus was the nabk, the berry of the lote-bush (Zizyphus lotus), which the Arabs of Barbary still eat. ...
— Ceylon; an Account of the Island Physical, Historical, and • James Emerson Tennent

... Bridge Road, and they sat on Booty's bed with their arms round each other's shoulders while Booty read aloud to Ransome from the pages of the Poly. Prospectus. Booty was a slender, agile youth with an innocent, sanguine face, the face of a beardless faun, finished off with a bush of blond hair that stood up from his forehead like ...
— The Combined Maze • May Sinclair

... denizens—the "gaunt gray nightmare" of a mother, mopping and mowing in the dusk, the brothers, "two obscure goblin creatures, fox-faced this, cat-clawed the other," with Guido himself as the main monster. Yet the Count, short of stature, "hook-nosed and yellow in a bush of beard" is not a monster but a man; possessed of intellectual ability and a certain grace of bearing when occasion requires; although wrenched and enfeebled by the torture of the rack he holds his ground, has even a little irony to spare, and makes a skilful defence. Browning does not need a ...
— Robert Browning • Edward Dowden

... verily on recognising that flush on a whole side of "The Awkward Age" that I brand it all, but ever so tenderly, as monstrous—which is but my way of noting the QUANTITY of finish it stows away. Since I speak so undauntedly, when need is, of the value of composition, I shall not beat about the bush to claim for these pages the maximum of that advantage. If such a feat be possible in this field as really taking a lesson from one's own adventure I feel I have now not failed of it—to so much more demonstration of my profit ...
— The Awkward Age • Henry James

... Sir Hokus, waving his sword at the large bush. The two bushes looked up in surprise, and when they saw Dorothy, the Cowardly Lion and Sir Hokus, they fell into each other's branches and burst ...
— The Royal Book of Oz • L. Frank Baum

... little beating about the bush, the little "job" is arranged amicably, on the practical basis of "a fiver each, and mum's the word on both sides," thus evading the law, saving the Builder a few pounds, and supplementing the salary of the Surveyor. Ulterior ...
— Punch, Or The London Charivari, Vol. 99., October 11, 1890 • Various

... time to be mean and threatening. Bush-whacking at night was attempted, and they even threatened an attack on our headquarters ranch; but we were a pretty strong outfit, had our own sheriff, and by-and-by ...
— Ranching, Sport and Travel • Thomas Carson

... occasion to have called for a pipe after taking a meal at a coaching-inn called the "Bush" at Bristol, when the waiter told him that smoking was not allowed at the Bush. Parr persisted, but the authorities at the inn were firm in their refusal to allow anything so vulgar as smoking on their premises, whereupon Parr is said to have exclaimed: "Why, man, I've smoked in the dining-room ...
— The Social History of Smoking • G. L. Apperson

... I go. I'le drug no more." And beneath the mirtle, the Canada thistle, and the gooseberry-bush he rests, with the follerin epitaff ...
— Punchinello, Vol. II., No. 35, November 26, 1870 • Various

... ethical value. Or again, the completeness referred to may be that which is alone complete in the strict sense of the word, namely, the universe. And we might say that a rose-leaf would require greater transformation in order to become complete in this sense than a rose-bush, or that the act of giving a cup of cold water was less complete than the far-reaching activity say of the first Napoleon. But this difference in completeness would not entail a corresponding difference ...
— Recent Tendencies in Ethics • William Ritchie Sorley

... and streams bear upon their bosoms leaves of all tints, from the deep maroon of the oak to the pale yellow of the chestnut. In the glens and nooks it is so still that the chirp of a solitary cricket is noticeable. The red berries of the dogwood and spice-bush and other shrubs shine in the sun like rubies and coral. The crows fly high above the earth, as they do only on such days, forms of ebony floating across the azure, and the buzzards look like kingly birds, sailing round ...
— Winter Sunshine • John Burroughs

... few minutes that it took us to rattle home I wondered what was to be done with poor Coachy. I didn't have long to wait. I led the horse into the stable, and as I was returning I discovered my little girl sitting on the grass by a rose-bush, with what we had ...
— Harper's Young People, October 12, 1880 - An Illustrated Weekly • Various

... they kidded us on the boat. From what they said it's fair crawlin' with snakes and jaggers and lizards and bloody vampires and spiders as big as yer fist. And the water is full o' man-eatin' fish and the bush full o' man-eatin' Injuns. If that's what ye call empty, Cap, don't take me ...
— The Pathless Trail • Arthur O. (Arthur Olney) Friel

... good old patriarchs and slaveholders," might at small cost greatly augment their numbers. A single stanza celebrating patriarchal concubinage, winding off with a chorus in honor of patriarchal drunkenness, would be a trumpet call, summoning from bush and brake, highway and hedge, and sheltering fence, a brotherhood of kindred affinities, each claiming Abraham or Noah as his patron saint, and shouting, "My name is legion." What a myriad choir, ...
— The Anti-Slavery Examiner, Omnibus • American Anti-Slavery Society

... in the way of bombs, sandbags and so forth. By 10 o'clock the trenches had been reduced to a decent order, and the men were able to eat their breakfasts. At noon the Oxfords, who had been moving away to the right, took over from 81-97; B Company carried on the line to a large bush near 28, which had escaped the bombardment, and from there C Company extended to the Bucks' right flank. This sorting out had scarcely been accomplished when the enemy started a heavy bombardment, which lasted until 5 p.m. For the last ...
— The War Service of the 1/4 Royal Berkshire Regiment (T. F.) • Charles Robert Mowbray Fraser Cruttwell

... he had on earlier days, half-maudlin from "his drop at the 'Bull and Bush,'" exclaimed to Maggie, "I can't call myself a success! I'm a rotten failure if you want to know, and I had most things in my favour to start with, went to Cambridge, had a good opening as a barrister. But it wasn't quick enough for me. I was restless ...
— The Captives • Hugh Walpole

... conference of the suffragists attending the convention in Chicago and a plank was drawn up. Miss Hay, Mrs. Richard Edwards, Mrs. Maud Wood Park, Mrs. George Gellhorn, Miss Ada Bush and Mrs. Pattie Ruffner Jacobs constituted a committee to present this plank to the Resolutions Committee of which Senator James E. Watson (Ind.) was chairman. Miss Hay made the principal speech and Mrs. Gellhorn and Miss Bush spoke briefly. A sub-committee of ...
— The History of Woman Suffrage, Volume V • Ida Husted Harper

... quickly down. My shoulder struck against the rock and threw me out of balance; for an instant I reeled over upon the verge, in danger of falling, but, in the excitement, I thrust out my hand and seized a small alpine gooseberry bush, the first piece of vegetation we had seen. Its roots were so firmly fixed in the crevice that it held ...
— Little Masterpieces of Science: Explorers • Various

... don't know what we would do." She advanced to the bedside. He made her want to shudder, he was so ugly in his long green dressing gown. With his bald head and piercing eyebrows he made her think of a gigantic worm. When he spoke his head waggled just as a worm's head waggles when it tops a rose bush. ...
— Little Miss By-The-Day • Lucille Van Slyke

... leagues or a little more, until they came to that place where the road crossed the smooth stream of water afore told of; and there was the castle of Sir Turquine as afore told of; and there was the thorn-bush and the basin hanging upon the thorn-bush as afore told of. Then the maiden said: "Sir Launcelot, beat upon that basin and so thou shalt summon Sir Turquine ...
— The Story of the Champions of the Round Table • Howard Pyle

... little shady, sweet-smelling nooks, just as they had been; all the little field-parlors, opening with their winding turns between bush and rock, one into another. The twenty households might find twenty separate places, if they all wanted to take a private ...
— Real Folks • Mrs. A. D. T. Whitney

... once more launched myself on the descent. As it chanced, the worst of the danger was at an end, and I was so fortunate as to be never again exposed to any violent concussion. Soon after I must have passed within a little distance of a bush of wallflower, for the scent of it came over me with that impression of reality which characterises scents in darkness. This made me a second landmark, the ledge being my first. I began accordingly ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 20 (of 25) • Robert Louis Stevenson

... as if it were only yesterday (1720). I was curious and mischievous. They had put a doll in a rosemary bush for the purpose of making me believe it was the child ...
— The Memoirs of the Louis XIV. and The Regency, Complete • Elizabeth-Charlotte, Duchesse d'Orleans

... action was called by the name of Christ, whom it signified: whereas this dove came suddenly into existence, to fulfil the purpose of its signification, and afterwards ceased to exist, like the flame which appeared in the bush to Moses." ...
— Summa Theologica, Part III (Tertia Pars) - From the Complete American Edition • Thomas Aquinas

... speaking. Her cousin took his hat and joined her. It was summer outside. Her brother Fred was plucking a sprig of flowery currant to put in his coat, from the bush at the angle of the house. She took no notice. Her cousin followed ...
— The Rainbow • D. H. (David Herbert) Lawrence

... seen except that in the Martin orchard "Ol' Martin" was working with his team under the trees which came in rows down to the road. Finding nothing to interest him there, he turned toward the village and his eyes searched the street. Opposite the Gwynnes' gate, Dr. Bush's house stood back among the trees, but there was no sign of life about it. Further down on the same side of the street, the Widow Martin's cottage, with porch vine covered and windows bright with flowers, hid itself under a great spreading maple. In front ...
— The Major • Ralph Connor

... peevish. He was so hungry! And he couldn't help thinking how good old Mother Grouse would have tasted. He couldn't reach her now. But still he didn't go along toward home. He simply couldn't keep his greedy eyes off fat old Mother Grouse! And he squatted down beside a bush and ...
— The Tale of Tommy Fox • Arthur Scott Bailey

... was like his counsel. He saw our plain New England life with as honest New England eyes as ever looked at a huckleberry-bush or ...
— The Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. (The Physician and Poet not the Jurist)

... have to watch them close at night For fear they'll make a rush, And break away in headlong flight Across the open bush; And by the camp-fire's cheery blaze, With mellow voice and strong, We hear the lonely watchman raise The Overlander's song: 'Oh! it's when we're done with roving, With the camping and the droving, ...
— Rio Grande's Last Race and Other Verses • Andrew Barton 'Banjo' Paterson

... (Rosaceae) Hardhack or Steeple Bush; Meadow-Sweet or Quaker Lady; Common Hawthorn, White Thorn, Red Haw or Mayflower; Five-finger or Common Cinquefoil; High Bush Blackberry, or Bramble; Purple-flowering or Virginia ...
— Wild Flowers Worth Knowing • Neltje Blanchan et al

... The Bush Summer Crookneck is generally esteemed the finest of the summer varieties. It is used only while young and tender, or when the skin can be easily pierced or broken by the nail. After the fruit hardens, ...
— The Field and Garden Vegetables of America • Fearing Burr

... day, but I see it. It penetrates the light like dust. At first I seem to see a sort of light, but then—good heavens, the sky is dark, the earth is dark, all is like soot. Yonder is something vague and misty. I can't even make out what it is. Is it a human being, is it a bush? My grief is great, immense! (Grows pensive) If I cried, who would hear me? If ...
— Savva and The Life of Man • Leonid Andreyev

... But what was the good? He would soon know her real record, if he did not already know it. Kind friends would soon enlighten him, and then he would despise her the more. A man of such broad experience was not to be hoodwinked so easily. No, it was folly to beat about the bush. At one time she might have seized the happiness he held out to her, but now it was ...
— The Easiest Way - A Story of Metropolitan Life • Eugene Walter and Arthur Hornblow

... said Stedman. "Not so very often; about once a year. The Nelson thought this was Octavia, and put off again as soon as she found out her mistake, but the Bradleys took to the bush, and the boat's crew couldn't find them. When they saw your flag, they thought you might mean to send them back, so they ran off to hide again; they'll be back, though, when they ...
— The Exiles and Other Stories • Richard Harding Davis

... the spring come—no easy task for one conscious that time was flying, his birds in the bush no nearer the hand, no issue from the web anywhere visible. Mr. Polteed reported nothing, except that his watch went on—costing a lot of money. Val and his cousin were gone to the war, whence came news more favourable; Dartie was behaving himself so far; James had retained his health; ...
— Forsyte Saga • John Galsworthy

... The eastern sky was beginning to grow pale, and as we were supping we saw the paroquets in couples flying over our heads towards the forest. Humming-birds were flitting in every direction, and flocks of other passerines flew from one bush to another. When they offered to perch near our bivouac, l'Encuerado requested them in polite terms to settle a little farther away, and, on their refusal, urged his request by throwing a stone at them, which but rarely failed in its purpose. The sun set, and the mountains stood out ...
— Adventures of a Young Naturalist • Lucien Biart

... a great friend of the first Lord Lytton, the novelist, and they had together dabbled in Black Magic. Sir Charles declared that the last chapters in Bulwer-Lytton's wonderful imaginative work, A STRANGE STORY, describing the preparation of the Elixir of Life in the heart of the Australian Bush, were all founded on actual experience, with the notable reservation that all the recorded attempts made to produce this magic fluid had failed from their very start. He had in his younger days joined a society of ...
— The Days Before Yesterday • Lord Frederick Hamilton

... Ben Sutton out of the way and wondering when the show would begin—Beryl Mae in her high, innocent voice had just said to the poet: 'But seriously now, are you sincere?' and I was getting some plenty of that, when up the road in the dusk I seen Bush Jones driving a dray-load of furniture. I wondered where in time any family could be moving out that way. I didn't know any houses beyond the club and I was pondering about this, idly as you might say, when Bush Jones pulls his team up right in front of the clubhouse, and there on the load is the ...
— Somewhere in Red Gap • Harry Leon Wilson

... "Halt!"—"Surrender!" a man disappeared. He was not with those who escaped, nor with the dead when they were buried, nor among the wounded anywhere, nor in any group of prisoners. But long after the war was over, another man, swinging a bush scythe among the overgrown corners of a worm fence, found the poor remnant of him, put it scarcely underground, and that was the end. How many times ...
— Bonaventure - A Prose Pastoral of Acadian Louisiana • George Washington Cable

... when I left you I started to fly over the trees, and just as I got to this side of the forest I saw a bush that was loaded down with the most luscious fruit you can imagine. The fruit was about the size of a gooseberry and of a lovely lavender color. So I swooped down and picked off one in my bill and ate it. At once I began ...
— The Scarecrow of Oz • L. Frank Baum

... selfish cunning. The bulky, good-natured, ignorant lion who has only one honest way of defending himself, namely with tooth and claw, is no match for the jumping two-legged little rascal who hides himself behind a bush and fires a gun aimed direct at the bigger brute's heart. Yet the lion's mode of battle is the braver of the two, and the cannons, torpedoes and other implements of modern warfare are proofs of man's cowardice and cruelty as much as they are of his diabolical ingenuity. Calmly comparing the ...
— Vendetta - A Story of One Forgotten • Marie Corelli

... David's retreat, and near at hand is the low-browed entrance of the galleried cave alternating between narrow passages and spacious halls, but all oppressively hot and close. Waste and wild, without a bush or a tree, in the feverish atmosphere of Palestine, it was a desolate region, and at length the wanderer's heart fainted in him, as he thought of his own home, with its rich and lovely terraced slopes, green ...
— A Book of Golden Deeds • Charlotte M. Yonge

... women, must now double and treble their labour. The old men must go to the corvee, and mend the banks of the Nile for the Prince and his pashas, providing their own food, their own tools, their own housing, if housing there would be—if it was more than sleeping under a bush by the riverside, or crawling into a hole in the ground, their yeleks their clothes by day, their only ...
— The Judgment House • Gilbert Parker

... a narrow strip of beach; thick, dark, damp, scary jungle. My father hardly knew where to go, so he crawled under a wahoo bush to think, and ate eight tangerines. The first thing to do, he decided, was to find the river, because the dragon was tied somewhere along its bank. Then he thought, "If the river flows into the ocean, ...
— My Father's Dragon • Ruth Stiles Gannett

... to the important idea quickly. In applying for a position, do not beat around the bush, or say you "wish to apply" or "would apply". Begin, "I make application for ...", "kindly consider my application for ...", or "I ...
— The Century Handbook of Writing • Garland Greever

... licked his lips. 'This is a splendid hunting-ground,' he said, and his tail grew bottle-brushy at the thought of it, and he scuttled up and down the garden, snuffing here and there till he heard very sorrowful voices in a thorn-bush. ...
— The Kipling Reader - Selections from the Books of Rudyard Kipling • Rudyard Kipling

... has a marked influence on Tactics owing to the restrictions it imposes on view and on movement. Forest, jungle, and bush, mountains and ravines, rivers and streams are natural obstacles, while cultivation adds woods and plantations, fences and hedges, high growing crops, farm houses, villages and towns, with sunken roads below the surface of the adjoining land, and civilisation brings in its train ...
— Lectures on Land Warfare; A tactical Manual for the Use of Infantry Officers • Anonymous

... fruits, nuts, berries, gathering clams or fish, was no more common than the fact of present-day man getting his own breakfast alone. The main difference is that in the former condition individuals obtained the food as nature left it, and passed it directly from the bush or tree to the mouth, while in modern times thousands of people have been working indirectly to make it possible for a man to wait ...
— History of Human Society • Frank W. Blackmar

... longings wild my soul is fill'd, Spring's voices shout within me; Each fiber in my soul is thrill'd With feelings that would win me. In bush and brake The buds awake, Of nature's joy the woods partake, And bear me helpless, spent, along Where freedom lives far from the throng; Thus pours the mountain torrent wild, That stubborn rocks would check; Thus rolls the molten lava stream, Dispersing havoc dire, supreme, Enfolding, ...
— Chapters of Opera • Henry Edward Krehbiel

... examinations had ended that afternoon and Graduation Day was only some twenty-eight hours away, none of the three was doing anything more onerous than yawning, and the yawn which came from Perry Bush, didn't sound as though it cost much of an effort. It was, rather, a comfortable, sleepy yawn, one that expressed contentment and relief, a ...
— The Adventure Club Afloat • Ralph Henry Barbour

... downwards. The steel castings after being annealed are dressed and carefully examined for defects. The exterior of the body is generally ground by an emery wheel or turned in a lathe; the groove for the driving band is also turned and the fuze hole fitted with a gun-metal bush. Forged-steel common shell are made from solid steel billets. These are heated to redness and shaped by a series of punches which force the heated metal through steel dies by hydraulic pressure. If the shell is intended for a nose fuze the base ...
— Project Gutenberg Encyclopedia

... flash of sullen fire in his eyes at the mention of McDowell's name. "The Inspector's there—sittin' tight," he added, and to Keith's amazement brushed past him without another word and disappeared into the bush. ...
— The River's End • James Oliver Curwood

... not plenty of free food in the island, God knows what would have become of us! But there it was, fresh in every field, by every wayside, at every doorway. We could not starve, or die of thirst, or faint for lack of sleep, since every bush was a bed in spite of the garapatos or wood-ticks, the snore of the tree-toad, the hoarse shriek of the macaw, and the shrill gird of the guinea- fowl. Every bed was thus free, and there was land ...
— The Judgment House • Gilbert Parker

... stone pine of very singular growth. Its girth at one foot from the ground is six feet four inches; at that height it immediately begins to branch out, and spreads, at least, twenty-one feet on each side, forming a large bush of ...
— A Walk from London to Fulham • Thomas Crofton Croker

... valiant attempt to board and Lieut. Morris with his own hands was attempting to lash the two ships together. Abandoning this attempt, he leaped upon the taffrail, and called upon his men to follow him. Lieut. Bush of the marines, and Mr. Alwyn, were soon at the side of the intrepid officer, when, at a sudden volley of musketry from the British, all three fell back, poor Bush dead, and the two others badly wounded. The ships then drifted asunder; ...
— The Naval History of the United States - Volume 1 (of 2) • Willis J. Abbot

... want is, you want much of meat. Why should you want? Behold, the earth hath roots; Within this mile break forth a hundred springs; The oaks bear mast, the briars scarlet hips; The bounteous housewife, Nature, on each bush Lays her full mess before you. Want! ...
— The Life of Timon of Athens • William Shakespeare [Craig edition]

... the Philistines was silent as the grave. The two chums crouched behind a thick bush, and peering through its leafless branches could see nothing but the closed double doors, and a stretch of blank wall ...
— The Triple Alliance • Harold Avery

... at the height of Mrs. Treacher's indignation, a sneeze sounded from a bush across the patch of garden; and the eyes of her visitors, attracted by the sound, rested on an object which Mrs. Treacher, by interposition of her shoulders, had been doing her best to hide—a scarecrow standing unashamed in the midst of the garrison ...
— Major Vigoureux • A. T. Quiller-Couch

... of serpents winding themselves about his feet, in the disguise of innocent grasses? And what sinister demon was that, waiting for him down there, crouching on all fours on a rock, disguised as a bush and ready to jump upon him? Were not the demons waiting for him at the monastery also? Did they not nest in the openings of the great tower? Was there not a black flame flashing in those openings? No, no, not now; now ...
— The Saint • Antonio Fogazzaro

... flavor, and bring the highest prices, but shrink enormously in curing, and many growers consider it more profitable to leave them until they are well matured. It requires about four pounds of fresh leaves to make one pound of dry leaves, and black tea and green tea are grown from the same bush. If the leaf is completely dried immediately after picking it retains its green color, but if it is allowed to stand and sweat for several hours a kind of fermentation takes place which ...
— Modern India • William Eleroy Curtis

... growth of bush was about ten feet wide. On either side the flat Nevada plain stretched away—empty. ...
— Astounding Stories, February, 1931 • Various

... and take delight in shameful treatment of the defenseless." He heard the tramping of horses' feet among the bushes only a short distance away, and soon several men galloped past where he lay—so close that one of the horses brushed against the bush which sheltered him. The frightened minister lay perfectly still until the footsteps died away, then he arose and went cautiously back to the city to see, if possible, what had been the fate of his wife and children, left to the mercy of ...
— Hanover; Or The Persecution of the Lowly - A Story of the Wilmington Massacre. • David Bryant Fulton

... on either side even of Collins-street. After floundering helplessly about in the foundation-cutting of a new house, which was already full of water, but happily only a few inches deep, we at length emerged upon the open of the present Fitzroy Gardens, where for a little time we could keep to the bush track only by trying the ground with our feet or our fingers. But in spite of all care we soon lost the road, and wandered about in the pouring rain for the rest of the night. We were young and strong, and as the rain did not chill us, we were in but little discomfort. A beauteous sunny morning ...
— Personal Recollections of Early Melbourne & Victoria • William Westgarth

... my selfe haue lym'd a Bush for her, And plac't a Quier of such enticing Birds, That she will light to listen to the Layes, And neuer mount to trouble you againe. So let her rest: and Madame list to me, For I am bold to counsaile you in this; Although we fancie not the Cardinall, Yet must we ioyne with him and with ...
— The First Folio [35 Plays] • William Shakespeare

... formed the direct duty of the so-called 'impartial witness' (unpartheiischer Zeuge) but since they had no such person present, he, Herr von Richter, would readily yield this privilege to his honoured colleague. Pantaleone, who had already succeeded in obliterating himself behind a bush, so as not to see the offending officer at all, at first made out nothing at all of Herr von Richter's speech, especially, as it had been delivered through the nose, but all of a sudden he started, stepped hurriedly forward, and convulsively thumping at his chest, in a hoarse voice wailed out ...
— The Torrents of Spring • Ivan Turgenev

... through the dew-drops, and the grass of the prairie seemed decked with diamonds. Black vultures, which soared even higher than the eagles and the kites, traced out in the blue sky the immense curves of their majestic flight. On every bush insects spread their gauzy wings; perhaps they felt that not a minute should be lost by beings whose birth, life, and death are all ...
— Adventures of a Young Naturalist • Lucien Biart

... 27th.—At supper last night, a houseboat fisherman, going by in his skiff, parted the willows fringing our beach, and offered to sell us some of his wares. We bought from him a two-pound catfish, which he tethered to a bush overhanging the water, until we were ready to dress it; giving us warning, that meanwhile it would be best to have an eye on our purchase, or the turtles would devour it. Hungry thieves, these turtles, the fisherman said; you could leave nothing edible in water ...
— Afloat on the Ohio - An Historical Pilgrimage of a Thousand Miles in a Skiff, from Redstone to Cairo • Reuben Gold Thwaites

... of the dogs, guiding them down the rough side of the ridge, while Howland steadied the toboggan from behind. For three-quarters of an hour they traversed the low bush of the plain in silence. From every rising snow hummock Jean scanned the white desolation about them, and each time, as nothing that was human came within his vision, he turned toward the engineer with a sinister shrug of his shoulders. Once three ...
— The Danger Trail • James Oliver Curwood

... sunny morning in May and, if he had loitered on the way when the cold March winds blew up his jacket sleeves and made him shiver, and when the snow lay in great drifts by the roadside, how could he help wishing to linger now when every bush held a bird and ...
— A Kindergarten Story Book • Jane L. Hoxie

... along in one continuous roar. They caught the snow new-fallen from the earth And wove a sheet with which to blind the eyes Of those two wanderers on the frozen waste. Then night came on; dark night came suddenly, And hid within its bosom bush and tree, And all that stood as waymarks to their home. The little winding path they trod that morn Was now a path no more; yet had his brain Been clear as on the morn, his step as firm, The father might have found his homeward way. But oft the earth seemed ...
— Canadian Wild Flowers • Helen M. Johnson

... see where people live," I said, as two smoky spouts of sand jetted from the tires and strewed over our shoes and pervaded our nostrils. "There's nothing—yes, there's one bush coming." I ...
— Red Men and White • Owen Wister

... were the homes of the Italian "banditos" and the Spanish "bandoleros" (banished men) and "salteadores" (raiders). The forests of England gave cover to the outlaws whose very much flattered portrait is to be found in the ballads of Robin Hood. The "maquis," i.e. the bush of Corsica, and its hills, have helped the Corsican brigand, as the bush of Australia covered the bushranger. But neither forest thicket nor mountain is a lasting protection against a good police, used with intelligence by the government, and supported by ...
— Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 4, Part 3 - "Brescia" to "Bulgaria" • Various

... forest combat between invisible and noiseless forces, but none the less deadly because neither could see nor hear his foe. Yet each knew that the other was always there. It was the slight waving of a bush or the flutter of a leaf, stirred by a ...
— The Riflemen of the Ohio - A Story of the Early Days along "The Beautiful River" • Joseph A. Altsheler

... use to mince the matter, Laud. Three hundred and fifty dollars don't grow on every bush in your or my garden; and I have been wondering, all the time, where a fellow like you should get money enough to buy a boat like ...
— The Yacht Club - or The Young Boat-Builder • Oliver Optic

... he commanded the waiter, pointing with his finger. "Wine over there. Wine to those three gents by that green bush. Tell 'em it's on me. D—n it! Wine ...
— The Trimmed Lamp and Others • O Henry

... Moreover, I soon learned to touch things without sensibly blurring the dream. I would cull a rose, and stick it in my buttonhole, and there it remained—but lo! the very rose I had just culled was still on the rose-bush also! I would pick up a stone and throw it at the wall, where it disappeared without a sound—and the very same stone still lay at my feet, however often I might pick ...
— Peter Ibbetson • George du Marier et al

... to have a proportionate extra amount of enjoyment at the public-house, where drink is very high. Good tradesmen would infallibly make money, but for this great failing. The bullock dray-drivers, certainly the best paid of all the working men, absolutely think nothing of coming from the Bush into Melbourne, with twenty or thirty pounds in their pocket, and spending every farthing of the sum—in one night—champagne to the mast-head. The innkeepers make fortunes rapidly. Shall I tell how much Boniface will draw in a week? No—for you will not ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine — Volume 55, No. 340, February, 1844 • Various

... heart, and that I do not live on for nothing: and treasure it up in your heart, that you have caused real joy to one who is often, very often, weighed down with heaviness and sorrow. You have not only kindled bright tapers upon my Christmas-tree, but the tree itself burns, gives light, and warms: the bush burns, and is not consumed, which is an image of the presence of the Holy Spirit, and its admonition to trust in the Most High in this wilderness of life, in mourning and in woe. Oh! my dear friend, I have been nigh unto death. What a solemn, quaking stride ...
— Christian Gellert's Last Christmas - From "German Tales" Published by the American Publishers' Corporation • Berthold Auerbach

... called the Kindur, which was said, on no better authority than a runaway convict's, to pursue a north-west course through Australia, now began to be noised about. This convict, whose name was Clarke, but who was generally known as the Barber, said that he had taken to the bush in the neighbourhood of the Liverpool Plains, and had followed down a river which the natives called the Gnamoi. He crossed it and came next to the Kindur. This he followed down for four hundred miles before he came upon the junction of the two. The union of the two formed a broad navigable river, ...
— The Explorers of Australia and their Life-work • Ernest Favenc

... of the canon lifted, The gray hawk breathless hung; Or on the hill a winged shadow drifted Where furze and thorn-bush clung; ...
— East and West - Poems • Bret Harte

... that the glory of things in the morning of love was a glamour cast upon the world, no outshine of indwelling radiance, should I care to breathe one day more the air of this or of any world? Nay, nay, but there dwells in everything the Father hath made, the fire of the burning bush, as at home in his son dwelt the glory that, set free, broke out from him on the mount of his transfiguration. The happy-making vision of things that floods the gaze of the youth, when first he lives in the marvel of loving, and being loved by, a woman, is the true vision—and ...
— The Flight of the Shadow • George MacDonald

... pieces a film portraying Shakespeare's tragedy of "Macbeth," on the ground that it contained too many scenes showing murder and other crimes, will soon become apparent even to over-zealous police and other censors of certain cities. As Mr. W. Stephen Bush writes in The Moving Picture World: "A very small and a very short-sighted minority of motion picture manufacturers, together with occasional lapses of National Censorship," are responsible for the ...
— Writing the Photoplay • J. Berg Esenwein and Arthur Leeds

... tremulously,—"I was obliged to bring you in. It is not proper to be seen on the street with an engage". The town is now full of these bush-lopers." ...
— The Chase Of Saint-Castin And Other Stories Of The French In The New World • Mary Hartwell Catherwood

... thing that impresses us most, and which we should be sorriest to lose, may be a thin grey film on the extreme horizon, not so large, in the space of the scene it occupies, as a piece of gossamer on a near-at-hand bush, nor in any wise prettier to the eye than the gossamer; but because the gossamer is known by us for a little bit of spider's work, and the other grey film is known to mean a mountain ten thousand feet high, inhabited by a race of ...
— Frondes Agrestes - Readings in 'Modern Painters' • John Ruskin

... now that this book is finished and Tom Brown, so far as I am concerned, is done with for ever, I must take this, my first and last chance of saying, that he is not I, either as boy or man—in fact, not to beat about the bush, is a much braver, and nobler, and purer fellow ...
— Tom Brown at Oxford • Thomas Hughes

... ter rest satisfied. After all, they're a good deal like lilock bushes, both of 'em. They may be cut down, and grubbed up, and a parsley bed made on the spot, but some day they sprout up ag'in, and before you know it you've got just as big a bush as ever. Does Stephen Petter know ...
— The Squirrel Inn • Frank R. Stockton

... is destitute of bush or tree, but the thick little bunches of gray-green grass that cover it everywhere are rich with juice and nutriment. This is the buffalo grass of the Western prairies, and the moment the horses' heads are released ...
— Starlight Ranch - and Other Stories of Army Life on the Frontier • Charles King

... before Christmas Day, 1870, the little town of Genoa, in the State of New York, exhibited, perhaps more strongly than at any other time, the bitter irony of its founders and sponsors. A driving snowstorm that had whitened every windward hedge, bush, wall, and telegraph pole, played around this soft Italian Capital, whirled in and out of the great staring wooden Doric columns of its post office and hotel, beat upon the cold green shutters of its best houses, and powdered the angular, stiff, dark figures ...
— Selected Stories • Bret Harte

... told to them who know it not? To a New Englander it might be said that a whortleberry bush changed its mind one day and decided to be a vine, with leaves as glossy as laurel, bells pink-striped and sweet like the arbutus, and berries in clusters and of scarlet instead of black. The Indians call it kinnikinnick, and smoke it in their pipes. White men call it bearberry, ...
— Composition-Rhetoric • Stratton D. Brooks

... the watch for an opportunity to strike a severe blow against these freebooters, and on the 8th of June opportunity was afforded. On the previous evening a party of burghers and Fingoes scoured the Fish River bush, and performed this duty efficiently, the Fingoes showing spirit, and generosity to the enemy. Colonel Somerset formed a junction with this force on the morning of the 8th. The colonel had under his command the Cape Mounted Rifles, a detachment ...
— The History of England in Three Volumes, Vol.III. - From George III. to Victoria • E. Farr and E. H. Nolan

... furiously, "strike, why don't you, and not beat about the bush so!" Because then he would be quite hopelessly in the wrong, and I could adopt any of several roles—the coldly haughty, the wounded but forgiving, ...
— Spanish Doubloons • Camilla Kenyon

... thorn bush, or oaken bough, Stuck in an Irish cabin's brow, Above the door, at country fair, Betokens entertainment there; So bays on poets' brows have been Set, for a sign of wit within. And as ill neighbours in the night Pull down ...
— The Poems of Jonathan Swift, D.D., Volume I (of 2) • Jonathan Swift

... our town, And he was wondrous wise, He jumped into a bramble bush, And scratched out both ...
— The Home Book of Verse, Vol. 1 (of 4) • Various

... cheerful frankness of brothers. Norah bore the epithet meekly—she held the view that it was better to be dead than fat. There was something boyish in the straight, slim figure in the blue linen frock—perhaps the quality was also to be found in a frank manner that was the product of years of the Bush and open-air life. The grey eyes were steady, and met those of others with a straight level glance; the mouth was a little firm-set for her years, but the child was revealed when it broke into smiles—and Norah was rarely grave. ...
— Mates at Billabong • Mary Grant Bruce

... crimson—I think it was velvet—with little knots on it and gems scattered here and there. A heron's plume clasped with a diamond brooch adorned the cap. Her hair hung over her shoulders. It is very dark and falls in a great bush of fluffy curls. When her headgear is off, her hair looks like a black corona. She is wonderfully beautiful, wonderfully beautiful. Her gown was of red stuff. Perhaps it was of velvet like the cap. It was hitched up with a cord ...
— Yolanda: Maid of Burgundy • Charles Major

... of the winter morning, we would see far off silhouetted against the pale green of the brightening eastern sky, the dove-like aeroplanes of the enemy moving over the distant forest like bees above a bush. ...
— The Sequel - What the Great War will mean to Australia • George A. Taylor

... So you know all about it; I thought as much. Then I can ask you, without beating about the bush—is Mrs. Linde to have an appointment ...
— A Doll's House • Henrik Ibsen

... risorgimento,"[1] says the Pope's Italian version on the monument. It is an ironical phrase in view of the history of the next twenty years. "They did not have long to wait," I said, "a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush." And my guide said, I thought well, of the French that they are a people of great gifts and of most generous mind, but that their rulers have often showed "un po' di volubilita, un ...
— With British Guns in Italy - A Tribute to Italian Achievement • Hugh Dalton

... rugged ascent of forty feet or more to the narrow ledge where the red fox lay. Although the face of the cliff was jagged, the rock greatly splintered and fissured, with many ledges, and here and there a tuft of weeds or a stunted bush growing in a niche, it was very steep, and would afford precarious foothold. The sunset was fading. The uncertain light would multiply the dangers of the attempt. But to leave a dollar lying there on the fox's head, that ...
— Down the Ravine • Charles Egbert Craddock (real name: Murfree, Mary Noailles)

... timidly; He knew if he let loose his rays The mischief there would be; He woke the sleeping world to life With finger-tips of gold, And up from meadow, wood and stream The shimmering mists unrolled; He lit the candles of the dawn On every bush and tree; The fairies on their homing wings Looked back and laughed with glee, "We've made a Fairyland for you, ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 156, Feb. 19, 1919 • Various

... all; there's only one like him in the service, and that's himself. Confound it, man, I'd know his skin upon a bush; he was only three weeks in the Tenth, and, indeed, your humble servant has the whole merit of his leaving it ...
— Charles O'Malley, The Irish Dragoon, Volume 2 (of 2) • Charles Lever

... in spirits had free development, the number of spirits and powers was countless, as many examples show. To give a single instance—the Australians hold that there is an innumerable multitude of spirits; the heavens, the earth, every nook, grove, bush, spring, crag, and stone are peopled with them. In the same way, some American tribes suppose the visible and invisible world to be filled with good and evil spirits; so do the Khonds, the Negroes of New Guinea, and, as Castren tells us, the Turanian tribes of Asia and Europe. Consequently, ...
— Myth and Science - An Essay • Tito Vignoli

... are not so unsophisticated as Adele: she demands a 'cadeau,' clamorously, the moment she sees me: you beat about the bush." ...
— Jane Eyre - an Autobiography • Charlotte Bronte

... fire, at which he had been warming himself while his parents were at work. As the father was reaping and the mother gleaning, the boy sat upon the grass. A wolf rushed upon him suddenly from behind a bush, caught him up by the loins, and made off with him towards the ravines. The father was at a distance at the time, but the mother followed, screaming as loud an she could for assistance. The people of the village ran to her aid, ...
— A Journey through the Kingdom of Oude, Volumes I & II • William Sleeman

... Osborne sneered. He hesitated, glowering in the difficulty of thinking. "See here, Monsieur Duchemin—since you prefer that style—I'm not going to beat about the bush with you. I'm a plain man, plain-spoken. They tell me you reformed. I don't know anything about that. It's my conviction, once a thief, always a thief. ...
— The False Faces • Vance, Louis Joseph

... the Hare, "for the matter of that, I have a home in every bush. But I have always thought that some day I would build a house, and I will go ...
— Boys and Girls Bookshelf (Vol 2 of 17) - Folk-Lore, Fables, And Fairy Tales • Various

... in the midst and a lot of blackthorn scrub round about. A noted place for a woodcock, also a snipe, and a spot from which trespassers were warned very careful. So Samuel took a look over to see that all was quiet, and there, in the midst, he marked a big girl struggling with a sloe-bush! But, quick though he was, she'd seen him first, and before he could call out and order her back to the road and take her name, she cried ...
— The Torch and Other Tales • Eden Phillpotts

... awake, and could not conjecture what the rumpus meant. But we fired too high in the dark, and did but little execution. Our shells fell beyond the enemy's camp on the opposite side of the river. We lost a few men, by accident, mostly. But hereafter in "each bush they fear ...
— A Rebel War Clerk's Diary at the Confederate States Capital • John Beauchamp Jones

... fear and astonishment I never saw. He stood incapable of moving a limb, riveted to the spot, mouth open and eyes staring. . . . He remained motionless until our black got within a few yards of him, when suddenly throwing down his waddies, he jumped into a mulga bush as high as he could get." He could not speak, and answered not a word to the inquiries made by the black, but, trembling from head to foot, "waved with his hand for ...
— The Expression of Emotion in Man and Animals • Charles Darwin

... dead of night the damsel opened his door, and with the keys that she had stolen, she opened twelve other locks that stood between them and the postern door. Then she brought him to his armour, which she had hidden in a bush, and she led forth his horse, and he mounted with much joy, and took the maid with him, and she showed him the way to a convent of white nuns, and there ...
— King Arthur's Knights - The Tales Re-told for Boys & Girls • Henry Gilbert

... the booksellers of Little Britain; and in the earlier part of the last century, the frequenters of this locality included such worthies as the Duke of Devonshire, Edward, Earl of Oxford, and the Earls of Pembroke, Sunderland, and Winchelsea. After the 'hunt' they often adjourned to the Mourning Bush in Aldersgate, where they dined and spent the ...
— The Book-Hunter in London - Historical and Other Studies of Collectors and Collecting • William Roberts

... the Ripley sisters well were aware that plain speaking never vexed them. Beating about the bush from artificiality or ignoring a plain issue was the sort of thing they resented. Consequently, the directness of David Walker's sally did not appear to them a liberty, but merely a legitimate summing up of the situation. Miss Rebecca was the spokesman ...
— The Law-Breakers and Other Stories • Robert Grant

... saw no glimmer of fire as he now approached the water-hole made him doubly cautious. Nearer, he crouched behind a bush. He threw a pebble at the pony. She circled the picket, awakening Collie, who spoke to her sleepily. Saunders crept back toward his horse. He knew that voice. He would track the young rider to the range and beyond—to the gold. ...
— Overland Red - A Romance of the Moonstone Canon Trail • Henry Herbert Knibbs

... letters of introduction to a few of his most influential parishioners, with the result that the pair soon had a sufficient financial backing by some of the leading men of Brooklyn, like A. A. Low, H. B. Claflin, Rufus T. Bush, Henry W. Slocum, Seth Low, Rossiter W. Raymond, Horatio C. ...
— The Americanization of Edward Bok - The Autobiography of a Dutch Boy Fifty Years After • Edward William Bok (1863-1930)



Words linked to "Bush" :   Japanese angelica tree, kapuka, cushion flower, caricature plant, flat pea, blueberry bush, Chilean rimu, butterfly bush, kudu lily, fuchsia, Euonymus americanus, Canella winterana, needle-bush, black bead, coffee rose, crystal tea, Cercis occidentalis, Erythroxylon truxiuense, bush tit, chanal, chalice vine, Genista raetam, Lagerstroemia indica, lentisk, hamelia, Chimonanthus praecox, Indigofera tinctoria, joewood, Erythroxylon coca, Ardisia crenata, groundsel tree, Dalea spinosa, Ledum palustre, coronilla, Brugmansia arborea, chaparral, dombeya, Acocanthera venenata, Jew-bush, ephedra, Lepidothamnus fonkii, flowering shrub, Apalachicola rosemary, bridal wreath, Japanese andromeda, Chilean nut, batoko palm, furze, Embothrium coccineum, hiccup nut, bush out, desert rose, Comptonia peregrina, boxwood, Kochia scoparia, geebung, honey bell, hovea, bean caper, Diervilla lonicera, Lyonia ligustrina, gooseberry, groundberry, Griselinia littoralis, capsicum pepper plant, kelpwort, chaparral broom, Adam's apple, flowering quince, firethorn, belvedere, cotton-seed tree, Malosma laurina, Codiaeum variegatum, Irish gorse, Lepidothamnus laxifolius, Benzoin odoriferum, Conradina glabra, Flacourtia indica, Geoffroea decorticans, hemp, alpine azalea, maikoa, Australian heath, calliandra, capsicum, Heteromeles arbutifolia, Lyonia mariana, Acocanthera oblongifolia, Canella-alba, Hakea leucoptera, Indian rhododendron, butcher's broom, Lepechinia calycina, coca, Brazilian potato tree, cinquefoil, Hercules'-club, casava, bearberry, buckler mustard, haw, Aristotelia serrata, supply, flowering hazel, Cajanus cajan, Lindera benzoin, Hakea lissosperma, Guevina heterophylla, currant, beat around the bush, Cycloloma atriplicifolium, ringworm bush, joint fir, Chamaedaphne calyculata, ground-berry, fire thorn, Ledum groenlandicum, Cestrum diurnum, crepe gardenia, chaparral pea, cherry laurel, cotoneaster, jasmine, flame pea, quail bush, Grewia asiatica, blolly, impala lily, false azalea, Epigaea repens, crape myrtle, five-finger, juneberry, Anagyris foetida, Camellia sinensis, huckleberry, leatherleaf, frangipanni, Leucothoe racemosa, cotton, Bassia scoparia, camellia, lady-of-the-night, honey-flower, marmalade bush, Kiggelaria africana, Codariocalyx motorius, blueberry root, Cytisus ramentaceus, coyote brush, Indian currant, allspice, fool's huckleberry, leucothoe, laurel sumac, boxthorn, maleberry, Bauhinia monandra, brittle bush, American angelica tree, Japanese allspice, Chilean flameflower, Chrysolepis sempervirens, juniper, Hibiscus farragei, Japan allspice, abelia, Larrea tridentata, cotton plant, Baccharis halimifolia, gastrolobium, hediondilla, corkwood, lavender, guinea flower, scarlet bush, Cineraria maritima, glory pea, needlebush, Desmodium motorium, hawthorn, Jacquinia keyensis, Gaultheria shallon, coca plant, Labrador tea, candlewood, bracelet wood, Astroloma humifusum, Graptophyllum pictum, hollygrape, Leycesteria formosa, cupflower, Halimodendron argenteum, Eriodictyon californicum, Lavatera arborea, barberry, black haw, castor-oil plant, East Indian rosebay, caragana, bean trefoil, Ardisia paniculata, render, Brunfelsia americana, alpine totara, German tamarisk, castor bean plant, croton, Jerusalem thorn, daphne, elder, Eryngium maritimum, governor's plum, honeyflower, Chile nut, stingaree-bush, Brugmansia suaveolens, andromeda, arrow wood, Dirca palustris, Lysiloma sabicu, Loiseleuria procumbens, Leucothoe editorum, heath, butterfly flower, Chilean hazelnut, guelder rose, crepe jasmine, derris, Aralia spinosa, Aristotelia racemosa, consumption weed, Cyrilla racemiflora, indigo, Chile hazel, Ardisia escallonoides, bush leaguer, California redbud, frangipani, ligneous plant, Euonymus atropurpureus, Chinese angelica tree, forsythia, furnish, bushy, Madagascar plum, Aralia stipulata, Datura suaveolens, leatherwood, climbing hydrangea, Kolkwitzia amabilis, Himalaya honeysuckle, Chiococca alba, Desmodium gyrans, woody plant, caper, Aralia elata, African hemp, blueberry, juniper bush, Lupinus arboreus, cassava, Datura arborea, Diervilla sessilifolia, Biscutalla laevigata, barbasco, Halimodendron halodendron, Chamaecytisus palmensis, corkwood tree, glasswort, columnea, Anadenanthera colubrina, Brugmansia sanguinea, Chinese holly, glandular Labrador tea, barilla, blackthorn, Griselinia lucida, Caulophyllum thalictroides, Anthyllis barba-jovis, jujube, fever tree, Aspalathus linearis, indigo plant, Adenium obesum, Leucothoe fontanesiana, lily-of-the-valley tree, daisy bush, Lambertia formosa, broom, Comptonia asplenifolia, Guevina avellana, coralberry, bladder senna, Catha edulis, grevillea, gardenia, kidney wort, Mahernia verticillata, holly-leaves barberry, provide, cat's-claw, dahl, catclaw, helianthemum, horsebean, lotus tree, Baccharis viminea, Hakea laurina, California beauty, Ilex cornuta, Christmasberry, hoary golden bush, arbutus, male berry, beauty bush, Georgia bark, Acalypha virginica, Argyroxiphium sandwicense, lavender cotton, false tamarisk, dwarf golden chinkapin, devil's walking stick, Leiophyllum buxifolium, crotch hair, buddleia, Chilopsis linearis, dog laurel, lomatia, clianthus, crampbark, forestiera, Lycium carolinianum, amorpha, Caulophyllum thalictrioides, Acocanthera oppositifolia, Dovyalis caffra, common flat pea, dhal, cranberry, cranberry heath, Dacridium laxifolius, bridal-wreath, Lyonia lucida, greasewood, guinea gold vine, Jupiter's beard, bryanthus, crowberry, lilac, cajan pea, day jessamine, hydrangea, Adenium multiflorum, dusty miller, chanar, Brassaia actinophylla, blue cohosh, box, black greasewood, bushman's poison, Acocanthera spectabilis, bristly locust, Aspalathus cedcarbergensis, crepe myrtle, Mahonia nervosa, bitter-bark, Fabiana imbricata, bitter pea, Mahonia aquifolium, Caesalpinia sepiaria, camelia, cyrilla, Jacquinia armillaris, Dalmatian laburnum



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