Free TranslationFree Translation
Synonyms, antonyms, pronunciation

  Home
English Dictionary      examples: 'day', 'get rid of', 'New York Bay'




Catch   /kætʃ/   Listen
Catch

noun
1.
A drawback or difficulty that is not readily evident.  Synonym: gimmick.
2.
The quantity that was caught.  Synonym: haul.
3.
A person regarded as a good matrimonial prospect.  Synonym: match.
4.
Anything that is caught (especially if it is worth catching).
5.
A break or check in the voice (usually a sign of strong emotion).
6.
A restraint that checks the motion of something.  Synonym: stop.
7.
A fastener that fastens or locks a door or window.
8.
A cooperative game in which a ball is passed back and forth.
9.
The act of catching an object with the hands.  Synonyms: grab, snap, snatch.  "He made a grab for the ball before it landed" , "Martin's snatch at the bridle failed and the horse raced away" , "The infielder's snap and throw was a single motion"
10.
The act of apprehending (especially apprehending a criminal).  Synonyms: apprehension, arrest, collar, pinch, taking into custody.



Related searches:



WordNet 3.0 © 2010 Princeton University








Advanced search
     Find words:
Starting with
Ending with
Containing
Matching a pattern  

Synonyms
Antonyms
Quotes
Words linked to  

only single words



Share |





"Catch" Quotes from Famous Books



... miles away. With the intention of not returning till after she had gone, he had ordered a carriage to be in readiness to drive her to her train; but his luncheon was scarcely ended when the thought occurred to him that, by hurrying back, he might catch a last glimpse of ...
— The Inner Shrine • Basil King

... no tragic transit, No catch of breath, When silent seasons inched me On to this death ...
— Time's Laughingstocks and Other Verses • Thomas Hardy

... for me the one for whom I shall ask." The woman said to him, "You know what Saul has done, how he has driven from the land the mediums and those who have messages from the spirits of the dead. Why then are you trying to catch me, to put me to death?" But Saul swore to her by Jehovah, saying, "As surely as Jehovah lives, no punishment will come to you from this act." Then the woman said, "Whom shall I bring up to you?" Saul said, ...
— The Children's Bible • Henry A. Sherman

... Subject. We here catch a glimpse of Caesar as he really was. He had spent a night near Puteoli (where Cicero also had a villa) with Philippus, the step-father of Octavianus. The Dictator proposed a visit, and Cicero in this memorable letter ...
— Helps to Latin Translation at Sight • Edmund Luce

... how to inspire blind, terrified obedience. Little boarding-school girls discuss Uncle Reuben and wonder if he is anything but a myth. A six-year-old child proposes that he should prove by experiment that it is impossible to catch a mortal cold on ...
— Invisible Links • Selma Lagerlof

... the princes and nobles, who, with uncovered heads, now crowd around their gallant emperor, and waving their hats, likewise shout "Harasho! harasho!"—"Good! very well!" Then the five hundred peasants rush in with their tin pans, kettles, and drums, and amid the most amazing din catch up the inspiring strain, and deafen every ear with their wild shouts of "Harasho! harasho!"—"Good! very well!" Upon which the emperor, rapidly mounting, places a finger in each ear, and, still puffing his cigar, ...
— The Land of Thor • J. Ross Browne

... chance to catch him by the collar, or nape of his neck, while feeding, and drag him out of his place of concealment, they will be compelled to cut away the combs all around his silken path, or gallery, and drag out ...
— A Manual or an Easy Method of Managing Bees • John M. Weeks

... say in a very small, far-away voice. "He is coming to himself now, thank God! It was chiefly cold and fright. He is safe now, Tolman. Don't you worry! You'd better go and get off some of your wet clothing, or you will catch your death." ...
— Steve and the Steam Engine • Sara Ware Bassett

... whole broadside of the Cerberus was poured, with good aim, into the bows of the leading Frenchman, which had attempted to pay her the same compliment. For a few moments at a time Paul could catch sight of the lights of the enemy's ships through the ports; but the smoke from their own guns quickly again shut out all objects, except the men standing close to him. Paul had plenty to do; jumping up to deliver the powder, and running down to the magazine for more when his ...
— Paul Gerrard - The Cabin Boy • W.H.G. Kingston

... appointment, and there I was had into a whole room full of women. There was my lady cousin Bellaston, and my Lady Betty, and my Lady Catherine, and my lady I don't know who; d—n me, if ever you catch me among such a kennel of hoop-petticoat b—s! D—n me, I'd rather be run by my own dogs, as one Acton was, that the story-book says was turned into a hare, and his own dogs killed un and eat un. Od-rabbit it, no mortal was ever run in such a ...
— The History of Tom Jones, a foundling • Henry Fielding

... Mr Blunt. "Well, I wish you luck! Through you I shall catch my train, and it means a little matter to me to the tune ...
— Brave and True - Short stories for children by G. M. Fenn and Others • George Manville Fenn

... Culture never catch up with her. Culture takes alarm at pursuit and avoids the stealthy pounce. Culture is a woman, and a certain amount of indifference wins her. Ardent wooing will not secure either wisdom or a woman—except in the ...
— Little Journeys to the Homes of the Great Philosophers, Volume 8 • Elbert Hubbard

... rocks without an instant's pause. At the tip is set a brush of silky hairs, which wave backwards and forwards with the precision of machinery. No wonder that the natives believe it a living thing. The purpose of these arrangements is to catch flies, which other species effect with equal ingenuity if less elaboration. Very pretty too are some of them, as B. Lobbii. Its clear, clean, orange-creamy hue is delightful to behold. The lip, so delicately balanced, quivers at every breath. If the slender stem be bent ...
— About Orchids - A Chat • Frederick Boyle

... man with your own eyes what do you try to find in him? The invisible man. These words which your ears catch, those gestures, those airs of the head, his attire and sensible operations of all kinds, are, for you, merely so many expressions; these express something, a soul. An inward man is hidden beneath the outward man, ...
— Prefaces and Prologues to Famous Books - with Introductions, Notes and Illustrations • Charles W. Eliot

... whither in hot weather the gentleman and his wife used to retire and divert themselves with their children, who played in the walk before them. But, though vanity had no votary in this little spot, here was variety of fruit and everything useful for the kitchen, which was abundantly sufficient to catch the admiration of Adams, who told the gentleman he had certainly a good gardener. Sir, answered he, that gardener is now before you: whatever you see here is the work solely of my own hands. Whilst I am providing necessaries for my table, I likewise procure myself an ...
— Joseph Andrews, Vol. 2 • Henry Fielding

... we catch up in our loving for all the week," Leslie explained with a quaint smile to one girl who broadly hinted that she would not mind being asked for over Sunday. "And, besides, you mightn't like the way we keep Sunday. Everybody who comes has to ...
— Cloudy Jewel • Grace Livingston Hill

... anxiety was that to the young Clary! Hour after hour, she paced the veranda in front of the cottage; now listening for approaching footsteps, now straining her eyes to catch through the gloom of the fir-trees the figure of him for whom she watched and wept in vain. The cold night wind sighed through her fair locks, scattering them upon the midnight air. The rising dews chilled ...
— Mark Hurdlestone - Or, The Two Brothers • Susanna Moodie

... higher, Uncle Jared; place the ensign in my hand; I am strong enough to wave it, while you cheer that flying band. Louder! louder! shout for Freedom, with prolonged and vigorous breath; Shout for Liberty, and Union, and—the victory over death! See! they catch the stirring numbers, and they swell them to the breeze, Cap, and plume, and starry banner, waving proudly ...
— Incidents of the War: Humorous, Pathetic, and Descriptive • Alf Burnett

... to catch someone's eye, but not a single eye in the crowd was turned to her; evidently they were all trying to avoid her look. She ...
— War and Peace • Leo Tolstoy

... carefully planned, fell far short of the success which was anticipated. To catch a redskin with a noose required more skill than was available. Accordingly, {52} none were taken alive. Champlain says: 'We retired to our barque after having done all we could.' Lescarbot adds: 'Six or ...
— The Founder of New France - A Chronicle of Champlain • Charles W. Colby

... disappointed love or ambition which moves round Cynthia or Diana or Sapho. Was there no lover who aspired as Endymion aspired, no Spanish king meriting the fate of Mydas, no man favoured as was Phao by Sapho? Even at this distance of time we can amuse ourselves by guessing names, and so catch something of the interest which, at the time of the play's appearance, would set eyebrows arching with surprise, and send, at each daring reference or well-aimed compliment, a nod of ...
— The Growth of English Drama • Arnold Wynne

... that, a little," Johns sighed profoundly. "It's the same juice that causes a gasoline truck to catch fire if you don't have a ground chain on it somewhere. But, just the same, ...
— Astounding Stories of Super-Science, June, 1930 • Various

... said on the subject of the United States, or of its government. This paragraph, extracted and translated, got into a Paris paper at a time when the persons in power there were laboring under very general disfavor, and their friends were eager to catch even at straws to buoy them up. 'To them, therefore, I have always imputed the interpolation of an entire paragraph additional to mine, which makes me charge my own country with ingratitude and injustice to France. There ...
— Memoir, Correspondence, And Miscellanies, From The Papers Of Thomas Jefferson - Volume I • Thomas Jefferson

... our darling from this hap! Arethusa, spread thy lap, Catch him, and with pinky hands Bear him to the coral sands, Where thy sisters sit in school Carding the Milesian wool:— Clio, Spio, Beroe, Opis and Phyllodoce,— Pass by these, and also pass Yellow-haired Lycorias; Pass Ligea, shrill of song— All the dear surrounding throng; ...
— Wandering Heath • Sir Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... considering that those badges of distinction, like bells about an ideot's neck, frequently serve only to render their folly more remarkable, and expose them to the contempt of the lookers on, who perhaps too, as nature is the same in all, want but the same opportunity to catch no less eagerly ...
— Life's Progress Through The Passions - Or, The Adventures of Natura • Eliza Fowler Haywood

... counsels took pity on them, and he spake to Hera, his sister and wife: "Ah woe is me for that it is fated that Sarpedon, the best-beloved of men to me, shall be subdued under Patroklos son of Menoitios. And in two ways my heart within my breast is divided, as I ponder whether I should catch him up alive out of the tearful war, and set him down in the rich land of Lykia, or whether I should now subdue him beneath the hands of the ...
— The Iliad of Homer • Homer (Lang, Leaf, Myers trans.)

... She had accepted him, and no doubt she realized that she was doing very well for herself. He had no misgivings on that point. Stella was a young woman who knew her own mind very thoroughly. She had secured the finest catch within reach, and she was not likely to repent of ...
— The Lamp in the Desert • Ethel M. Dell

... it, Ernest," said Bob, shaking his head. "I think she will catch us. This boat is the fastest, but we don't understand her well enough to ...
— Breaking Away - or The Fortunes of a Student • Oliver Optic

... best repartees at command. But they are all smiles and good humour again at the news that young So-and-so, with two or three more, who had strayed from their party, were sighted rushing along, all dust up to their eyes, to catch the train as it moved out of the station. There is no other to-night; but our good hostess, we know, will give the youngsters tea, put them to bed, and forward them prepaid next morning. At length the last station has poured ...
— Uppingham by the Sea - a Narrative of the Year at Borth • John Henry Skrine

... their presence would injure and displace white labor and white laborers. If there ever could be a proper time for mere catch arguments, that time surely is not now. In times like the present men should utter nothing for which they would not willingly be responsible through time and in eternity. Is it true, then, that colored people can displace any more white labor by being free ...
— Complete State of the Union Addresses from 1790 to the Present • Various

... right in his dictum about autobiographies; and so was Dr. Kitchener, in his about hares. First catch your perfectly sincere and unconscious man. He is even more uncommon than a genius of the first order. Most men dress themselves for their autobiographies, as Machiavelli used to do for reading the classics, in their best clothes; they receive us, as it were, in a parlor chilling and ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. IV, No. 26, December, 1859 • Various

... personality comprises but a fraction of what is known, and only a hint of what is to become known. There is an endocrine aspect to every human being and every human activity, normal and abnormal, internal process and its external expression, regulated by laws of which we are beginning to catch a glimpse. Their control promises us now a dominion over the most intimate and inaccessible recesses of our lives in a way comparable only to the control we now exercise over the forces and energies once revered as the instruments of the gods—light, heat, magnetism, electricity. ...
— The Glands Regulating Personality • Louis Berman, M.D.

... I like that fellow quaren well, an' I'd be sorry if any harm come to him. He's the sort gets into any bother that's about! Write to him now, will you, an' you'll catch the ...
— Changing Winds - A Novel • St. John G. Ervine

... talk was interrupted by the howling of a wolf on the opposite side of the strait, Kadachan puzzled the minister with the question, "Have wolves souls?" The Indians believe that they have, giving as foundation for their belief that they are wise creatures who know how to catch seals and salmon by swimming slyly upon them with their heads hidden in a mouthful of grass, hunt deer in company, and always bring forth their young at the same and most favorable time of the year. I inquired ...
— Travels in Alaska • John Muir

... ranges of hills and mountains were bleak and barren in their whiteness, the intervening valleys were all occupied either by vineyards or by fields in tillage. Even the ravines upon the steep hill-sides which had been scored out by the rainfall of ages were artificially arranged to catch the melted earth in its descent during heavy storms, and to form terraces ...
— Cyprus, as I Saw it in 1879 • Sir Samuel W. Baker

... particularly to those nations its waters directly touch. It provides low-cost sea transportation between East and West, extensive fishing grounds, offshore oil and gas fields, minerals, and sand and gravel for the construction industry. In 1996, over 60% of the world's fish catch came from the Pacific Ocean. Exploitation of offshore oil and gas reserves is playing an ever-increasing role in the energy supplies of US, Australia, NZ, China, and Peru. The high cost of recovering offshore oil and gas, ...
— The 2003 CIA World Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency

... miles home in the boats: the slightest flick of the foot would have sent one of them flying beyond the eye of God or man. After a couple of miles the shoes began to tell, and I stood still and lifted up one foot behind me, craning over my shoulder to see if I could catch sight of the glimmer of skin through the heel of the stocking. The fog was too ...
— A Diary Without Dates • Enid Bagnold

... felt she must do one of two things, laugh or scream and go on screaming, and she laughed. Peal after peal of laughter she sent echoing among the rocks, and Charles springing to his feet was just in time to catch her as she fell forward a dead ...
— Sketches in Lavender, Blue and Green • Jerome K. Jerome

... reaction, but the elderly man was already entering the air lock. Before Strong and Hawks could catch up to him, ...
— On the Trail of the Space Pirates • Carey Rockwell

... matter, viz. sin, in so far as sins are said to be the matter of Penance, as explained above (A. 2). This removal is expressed by the priest saying: "I absolve thee": because sins are fetters, according to Prov. 5:22. "His own iniquities catch the wicked, and he is fast bound with the ropes of his own sins." Wherefore it is evident that this is the most fitting form of this sacrament: "I ...
— Summa Theologica, Part III (Tertia Pars) - From the Complete American Edition • Thomas Aquinas

... ocean-wandering hulls, Away from all bright water and great hills And sheep-walks where the curlews cry their fills; Away in towns, where eyes have nought to see But dead museums and miles of misery And floating life un-rooted from man's need And miles of fish-hooks baited to catch greed And life made wretched out of human ken And miles of shopping women served by men. So, if the penman sums my London days, Let him but say that there were holy ways, Dull Bloomsbury streets of dull brick mansions old With ...
— Georgian Poetry 1911-12 • Various

... desert Reed had cached many valuable articles, but all his provisions had been distributed among his companions. This, however, was forgotten in the turbulent camp, and the destitute, desolate family could plainly catch the sound of voices clamoring for ...
— History of the Donner Party • C.F. McGlashan

... Berenice, among other diversions, had assumed a certain interest in one Lieutenant Lawrence Braxmar, U.S.N., whom she found loitering there, and who was then connected with the naval station at Portsmouth, New Hampshire. Cowperwood, coming East at this time for a few days' stay in order to catch another glimpse of his ideal, had been keenly disturbed by the sight of Braxmar and by what his presence might signify. Up to this time he had not given much thought to younger men in connection with her. Engrossed in her personality, he could think of nothing as being ...
— The Titan • Theodore Dreiser

... The catch, however, is simple. Using the same word, we interchange its different meanings. To say that a man is born a gentleman is to say that he was born under certain social conditions. To say in commendation or description of a man ...
— Ars Recte Vivende - Being Essays Contributed to "The Easy Chair" • George William Curtis

... we rose again. We ran along more than 120 feet, at a distance of one or two feet from the ground, and had the appearance of travelling in a sledge. The peasants ran after us without being able to catch us, like children pursuing a butterfly in ...
— Wonderful Balloon Ascents - or, the Conquest of the Skies • Fulgence Marion

... to be quiet, but he bumped into the one chair in the kitchen on his way to the kitchen cupboard. And it was not his fault that the cream pitcher fell when he took the sugarbowl from the shelf. Jerry made a quick and nice southpaw catch. Pretty good, he thought, for a right-hander. He hadn't been able to use his right because it was holding the sugarbowl. He had dumped the sugar into a cereal dish and was busily pouring salt into the sugarbowl when his ...
— Jerry's Charge Account • Hazel Hutchins Wilson

... you can induce the saints in your church to give the devil half as much trouble to catch them as you have given me, why they will be saved all right. Really a person who didn't know would have thought that your mother-in-law had died and that you were hurrying to make arrangements for ...
— The Hindered Hand - or, The Reign of the Repressionist • Sutton E. Griggs

... making it fit into an opening cut out of the near flap of the saddle (Fig. 16). I have found this arrangement a great improvement on the old clumsy flap, the lower edge of which is unpleasantly apt to catch on the rider's boot, especially when trotting. I shall discuss the failings of safety ...
— The Horsewoman - A Practical Guide to Side-Saddle Riding, 2nd. Ed. • Alice M. Hayes

... when he had done, "I am asking for your assistance for the last time. Go and fetch Dutreuil. Tell him just this: 'You are unmasked. The notes did not catch fire. Come with me.' ...
— The Eight Strokes of the Clock • Maurice Leblanc

... curiosity may not catch cold in the too sudden transition from exercise to inaction, the Shropshire and Cheshire Heroes have followed me down here, and I have had the pleasure of seeing and hearing of the crowds going to touch (for that is the present fashion of seeing, or, to speak ...
— Before and after Waterloo - Letters from Edward Stanley, sometime Bishop of Norwich (1802;1814;1814) • Edward Stanley

... certainly his great bowed shins, his dirty complexion, his high cheek-bones, and that impassive Oriental face of his, gave authority to the legend. When you met him you marked at once that his eyes were reluctant to catch yours; and when they did you saw two little gashes opening ...
— Boy Woodburn - A Story of the Sussex Downs • Alfred Ollivant

... is something that interests us whenever it rains or when the snow melts. It has been customary to locate catch-basins for receiving the surface water at street intersections. This arrangement causes most of the surface water from both streets to run past the crossings, making it necessary to depress the pavement, so that one must step down and up ...
— Manual of Gardening (Second Edition) • L. H. Bailey

... which roam among the rugged crags, are exceedingly difficult to catch. One of the sheep darted into a cleft. With a quick movement born of desperation Torrence rushed before the opening, but scarcely had he reached the spot before the frightened sheep, in attempting to escape, jumped into ...
— Wealth of the World's Waste Places and Oceania • Jewett Castello Gilson

... Deanery, and to the south a building known as the Wardrobe House; which name is supposed to indicate its use in connection with the King's House; still farther south is Leden Hall (or Leyden Hall), hidden behind trees, so that from the Close you can but catch a glimpse of the building by Elias de Derham, to which reference has been made earlier in this book. In the other direction are the Theological College, a very lovely and spacious building, the Choristers' School, and many private houses of great antiquity and considerable beauty. Indeed, ...
— Bell's Cathedrals: The Cathedral Church of Salisbury - A Description of its Fabric and a Brief History of the See of Sarum • Gleeson White

... put one beyond it—Christian example. I ought to be so saintly, so consecrated, that you could not be with me and not catch the very spirit of heaven; never get a letter from me that did not quicken your steps in the divine life. But while I believe the principle of love to Christ is entrenched in the depths of my soul, the emotion of love is hot always in that ...
— The Life and Letters of Elizabeth Prentiss • George L. Prentiss

... the island if our generals were MEN. If I were General, I would do it at once!" This burst of the tanner made the assembly laugh. He was saluted with cries of "Why don't you go, then?" and Nicias, thinking probably to catch his opponent in his own trap, seconded the voice of the assembly by offering to place at his disposal whatever force he might deem necessary for the enterprise. Cleon at first endeavoured to avoid the dangerous honour thus thrust upon him. But the more he drew ...
— A Smaller History of Greece • William Smith

... the pure and uncontaminate blood Holds its due course, nor fears the frost of age. One song employs all nations; and all cry, "Worthy the Lamb, for he was slain for us!" The dwellers in the vales and on the rocks Shout to each other, and the mountain-tops From distant mountains catch the flying joy; Till, nation after nation taught the strain, Earth rolls the rapturous Hosanna round. Behold the measure of the promise fill'd! See Salem built, the labor of a God! Bright as a sun the sacred city shines: All kingdoms and all princes ...
— A Brief Commentary on the Apocalypse • Sylvester Bliss

... fellow, as a vagrant," a third would observe; "and if I ever catch you coming up my avenue again, depend upon it, I will slip my dogs at you and ...
— Phelim O'toole's Courtship and Other Stories • William Carleton

... saw him mount a horse which his servant held in readiness for him, and, in another instant, he had disappeared in the woods. With him, however, passed the cloud he had raised; a thousand new objects of interest were before her, and her eyes seemed to catch the very sunbeams as they passed, while her light feet bounded eagerly to the spot where Sir ...
— The International Monthly, Volume 5, No. 3, March, 1852 • Various

... down the bundle. She had no idea. But she said: "This evening we were to go to the opera. I hardly fancy he will miss it on my account." She paused and with a little catch in her voice continued: "I know it is all my fault, I ought to have known better and I shall be so unhappy if you mind. Won't you ...
— The Paliser case • Edgar Saltus

... trade done in our own waters by the Dutch, the splendid fleet of fishing craft with twenty thousand handy sailors on board, ready by every 1st of June to sail out of the Maas, the Texel, and the Vlie, to catch herring in the North Sea, excited admiration, envy, ...
— Andrew Marvell • Augustine Birrell

... above them, struck terror into their hearts, as with speechless horror they gazed upon the dark outline of the terrible beast. There it stood, with its head raised, its neck stretched outward, and ears erect, as if to catch the echo that gave back those dismal sounds; another minute and he was gone, and the crushing of branches and the rush of many feet on the high bank above, was followed by the prolonged cry of some poor fugitive animal,—a doe, or fawn, perhaps,—in the very climax of mortal ...
— Canadian Crusoes - A Tale of The Rice Lake Plains • Catharine Parr Traill

... familiarity. Certain stale smells about the place (minor smells as compared with the prevalent odour) confused her; she could not decide whether she remembered them of old, or was reminded of the odours she used to catch in passing the pantry on ...
— Annie Kilburn - A Novel • W. D. Howells

... cargador bear heavy ladings of other people's goods; no more would the lavandera wear her life out in washing other people's clothes. And so all three waited and watched eagerly, straining their ears for the rattle of horses' feet upon the stone-paved streets; straining their eyes to catch the first glimpse of the burro-train stealing in from the Zona Libre with its rich load. For close beside them, across the causeway, the train that Pepe himself headed was to pass. Now and again they caught sight ...
— Stories by American Authors, Volume 10 • Various

... "Well, he won't catch cold camping out, at any rate! What do you think, sergeant? mustn't a chap like that be glad to have a good roof over his head every night? Well, go on! What about ...
— 'Jena' or 'Sedan'? • Franz Beyerlein

... reef and ocean-floor ecosystems. drift-net fishing - done with a net, miles in extent, that is generally anchored to a boat and left to float with the tide; often results in an over harvesting and waste of large populations of non-commercial marine species (by-catch) by its effect of "sweeping the ocean clean". ecosystems - ecological units comprised of complex communities of organisms and their specific environments. effluents - waste materials, such as smoke, sewage, or industrial waste which are released into the ...
— The 2005 CIA World Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency

... a maze, not of intricate paths but of blinding curtains. I am speaking now of that arrogant jungle, moist and hot, where life is in full ferment, and where the rubber vine grows and thrives; where you go knee-deep in slush and catch at a tree-bole to prevent yourself going farther, cling, sweating at every pore and shivering like a dog, feeling for firmer ground and finding it, only to be led on to another quagmire. The bush pig avoids ...
— The Pools of Silence • H. de Vere Stacpoole

... I never known this gentle Mother! Why could I not catch her mantle, and clinging to it, pass from ...
— Purgatory • Mary Anne Madden Sadlier

... Hal Overton, B Company, was among those in the street. And he was the first to catch sight of a horse coming up the ...
— Uncle Sam's Boys in the Philippines - or, Following the Flag against the Moros • H. Irving Hancock

... for Alan liked her and understood her. His heart went out to her. Compact of like clay, he knew the meaning of her hopes and aspirations. Often as he sketched he would look up and wait, expecting to catch the faint sound of her light step, or see her lithe figure poised breezy against the sky on the neighboring ridges. Whenever she drew near, his pulse thrilled at her coming,—a somewhat unusual experience with Alan Merrick. For ...
— The Woman Who Did • Grant Allen

... Italians sauntering behind their fruit carts answered my inquiry with a lift of the head that made their earrings gleam, and a wave of the hand that referred me to all four points of the compass at once. I was trying to catch the eye of the tall policeman who stood grandly in the middle of the crossing, a stout pillar around which the waves of traffic broke, when deliverance bellowed ...
— The Promised Land • Mary Antin

... Charles Brusky. It has attained at present such regularity as to permit the superintendent to live tolerably comfortably. They have horses they procure from Red River from the Indians; they raise plenty of potatoes, catch pike, suckers, pickerel, and white fish in abundance. They have also beaver, deer, and moose; but the provision they chiefly depend upon is wild oats, of which they purchase great quantities from the savages, giving at the rate of about one dollar and a half a bushel. But flour, pork, and salt ...
— Little Masterpieces of Science: Explorers • Various

... "I can see no catch or fault in it," replied Tillinghurst, casting his eyes over the ground, "the light is good, and there seemeth to ...
— The Fifth of November - A Romance of the Stuarts • Charles S. Bentley

... behind the light garrulity of Mrs. Cafferty, through which now and again, as through a veil, she saw the spike of his helmet, a wiry bristling moustache, a surge of great shoulders. On these ghostly indications she heaped a tornado of words which swamped the wraith, but she knew he was waiting to catch her alone, and would certainly catch her, and the knowledge ...
— Mary, Mary • James Stephens

... cannot penetrate, are stored home-made firkins full of yellow butter, and great cheeses, and heaps of substantial home-baked bread. Kegs of hard cider and spruce beer and perhaps more potent brews are abroach, and behind the haggling and jesting and bustle you may catch the sound of muskets or the whoop of the Indians from afar. Meanwhile, in the settlements, all manner of industries were stimulated, and a great number of women throughout the country, left to take care of their children and themselves by the absence of their men-folk, went into business of all ...
— The History of the United States from 1492 to 1910, Volume 1 • Julian Hawthorne

... old man," he continued. "I am going, please God, to cut through a barrier that has no right to exist. I'm going to let as brave and trusty a little craft as ever sailed go out into the broad waters where she belongs. Do you catch ...
— Janet of the Dunes • Harriet T. Comstock

... after the doctor!" said Simeon, shivering in the cold. "Yes. To look for a real doctor, trying to overtake the wind in the fields, and catch the devil by the tail, plague take him! What queer fish there are! God forgive me, a ...
— The House with the Mezzanine and Other Stories • Anton Tchekoff

... had a fund of useful information. The Purpose and Tenacity books insist on it. That's how you Catch your Employer's Eye. One morning the boss suddenly wants to know how many horsehair sofas there are in Brixton, the number of pins that would reach from London Bridge to Waterloo. You tell him, ...
— The Man Upstairs and Other Stories • P. G. Wodehouse

... strong influences that are not explainable by our philosophy of life. It is the intrusion into our matter-of-fact lives of the uncanny element, which the novice so grossly misuses in his tales of premonitory dreams and visions, and of most unghostly ghosts. "It is not enough to catch a ghost white-handed and to hale him into the full glare of the electric light. A brutal misuse of the supernatural is perhaps the very lowest degradation of the art of fiction. But 'to mingle the marvellous rather as a slight, delicate, and evanescent flavor ...
— Short Story Writing - A Practical Treatise on the Art of The Short Story • Charles Raymond Barrett

... day it was close upon the hour of Lauds, when the scouts that were set in sight of the chateau among the thick brushwood and gorse, came with great haste and told us that the Moors were even now on their way to us, hoping to catch us unsuspecting at our prayers. Now we had our orders of Brother Hugo in such a case, and we simply did what we had done already at his bidding, many times for practice of safety in an hour of danger. First the great heavy doors of the monastery were closed, and the bolts drawn, and the bars ...
— The Fall Of The Grand Sarrasin • William J. Ferrar

... "but the time which has wrenched asunder the allegiance of Christians to the church, and of subjects to their king, has dissolved all the lesser bonds of society; and, in such days, mere human ties must no more restrain our progress, than the brambles and briers which catch hold of his garments, should delay the path of a pilgrim who travels ...
— The Abbot • Sir Walter Scott

... past floe, winding in and out quietly, yet steadily!—and the whalers were soon astern. Penny, indefatigable, was seen struggling along the shore, with his boats ahead, towing, and every stitch of sail set to catch the lightest cat's paw: him too, however, we soon passed. The water ahead increased as we advanced, and we found, as is well known to be the case, that the pack-edge is always the ...
— Stray Leaves from an Arctic Journal; • Sherard Osborn

... into the town. At the door of the Mission I bid the Mate farewell, and I catch a last glimpse of him as he removes his hat and wipes his boots with the diffidence apparently interwoven in the fibre of all mariners ashore. He is not of a proselytising disposition. Strong Orangeman, ...
— An Ocean Tramp • William McFee

... a touch of high art the way this notorious pirate pitched the bag of gold toward his coxswain, crying, "Catch that, Pedillo!" and then the almost girlish manner in which he pattered about the beach and held up his trowsers, so that he might not even get his slippers damp. Had that salt water been red blood, he would not have cared if his feet had been ...
— Captain Brand of the "Centipede" • H. A. (Henry Augustus) Wise

... of hope; where upon every passing breeze is borne deep wailings of woe, bitter sighs ascending from bruised and broken hearts mourning over lost hopes, crushed affections, wasted love; struggling vainly for victory in the fierce battle of life; groping about in darkness to catch, if possible, one gleam of sunlight from the ...
— Words of Cheer for the Tempted, the Toiling, and the Sorrowing • T. S. Arthur

... in the British Museum is very imperfect, but it contains some fine old prints from the Prophets which should be studied by those who wish to understand the true merit of this great master, of whom Sir Joshua Reynolds said that, "to kiss the hem of his garment, to catch the slightest of his perfections, would be glory and distinction enough for ...
— Great Men and Famous Women, Vol. 8 (of 8) • Various

... said, "from your hesitation I knew that you would refuse to do such work as this. So I intended to catch you unawares, and to entangle you in it. I knew that you would not refuse to go to Amwell, and behave there as I directed, if I said no more ...
— Oddsfish! • Robert Hugh Benson

... wading up the stream, and hunting under every stone, and in each little pool, for the objects of their search. As soon as they see a trout, they drive it into little convenient nooks that they know of, and there—how they manage it nobody knows, but the result is certain—they catch them with their hands or knock them on the head with their sticks; and will always produce you a respectable dish at a few ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 61, No. 378, April, 1847 • Various

... its young by previously swallowing it; and afterwards putting its bill into theirs returns it into their mouths. See Sect. XXXIX. 4. 8. The pelicans use a stomach, or throat bag, for the purpose of bringing the fish, which they catch in the sea to shore, and then eject them, and eat them at their leisure. See Sect. XVI. 11. And I am well informed of a bitch, who having puppies in a stable at a distance from the house, swallowed the flesh-meat, which was given her, in large pieces, and carrying it immediately ...
— Zoonomia, Vol. II - Or, the Laws of Organic Life • Erasmus Darwin

... won't talk about yet awhile," was the grave reply. "We've got at least twelve hours before us, providing they don't catch us napping, and at such a time as this it is a much longer lease of life than ...
— The Search for the Silver City - A Tale of Adventure in Yucatan • James Otis

... object than to make it more attractive to the spectators. To any one at all acquainted with the Elizabethan drama their very titles speak them. These titles are Blurt Master Constable, Michaelmas Term, A Trick to Catch the Old One, The Family of Love [a sharp satire on the Puritans], A Mad World, my Masters, No Wit no Help Like a Woman's, A Chaste Maid in Cheapside, Anything for a Quiet Life, More Dissemblers besides Women. As with all the humour-comedies ...
— A History of English Literature - Elizabethan Literature • George Saintsbury

... of droning accent, which results from their swaying to and fro, you will see at once why it was that I, deprived by nature of the necessary apparatus with which to suspend myself in mid-air, was unable to quite catch the quality which gives its chief charm ...
— A House-Boat on the Styx • John Kendrick Bangs

... is what I am coming to," said Jim, in a low tone. "There is one man whom I know to be a thief, but though I have tried to, over and over again, I cannot catch him." ...
— Kafir Stories - Seven Short Stories • William Charles Scully

... elbow; 'you couldn't pay for it, if you sold all your things at auction.' 'Hold your tongue, you donkey!' said the fellow,—but softly, so that Saint Christopher should not hear him,—'do you think I'm in earnest? If I once get my foot on dry ground, catch me giving him so ...
— The Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. (The Physician and Poet not the Jurist)

... answer, Dave," returned Sam Barringford. "He may have gone two miles and he may have gone ten. We'll have to trust to luck to catch up to him. I don't calkerlate he went far ...
— On the Trail of Pontiac • Edward Stratemeyer

... natives, that they sometimes stayed his ships. He found also the people of these regions clothed in the skins of beasts, yet not without the use of reason. He says also that there are great numbers of bears in those countries, which feed on fish, and catch them by diving into the water; and being thus satisfied with abundance of fish, are not noisome to man. He says likewise that he saw large quantities of copper among the inhabitants of these regions. Cabot is my dear and familiar ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Volume VI - Early English Voyages Of Discovery To America • Robert Kerr

... no illusions about this matter! Crane soup is not satisfactory. It looks gray-blue and tastes gray-blue, and gives to your psychic inwardness a dull, gray-blue, melancholy tone. And when you nibble at the boiled gray-blue meat of an adult crane, you catch yourself wondering just what sort of ragout could be made out of boots; you have a morbid longing to know just how bad such a ragout ...
— The River and I • John G. Neihardt

... which the general in chief has been pleased to treat the case established—whether designedly or not remains to be seen—an equivocal public sentiment on the subject? There are always enough of that peculiar pestilential species who exist upon the breath of authority to catch up the whisperings of fancy and infect a whole military community. I do not design to be stifled under the miasma of such, nor stricken down in my advanced age, without an effort to convince my friends that I scorn to wear 'honor not earned.' ...
— General Scott • General Marcus J. Wright

... a very keen fisherman, was evidently more eager to talk to Meldon than to catch another salmon. He waded ashore at once and laid ...
— The Simpkins Plot • George A. Birmingham

... reply, but the words died on his lips. He staggered, and Philippe had but just time to catch him in his arms, and bear him half fainting ...
— The Queen's Necklace • Alexandre Dumas pere

... waiting for them to come back, and wondering why they should he so frightened at nothing but a bull-frog, which they must have seen a thousand times, the poor little simpletons! and thinking she should like to catch one of the smallest and carry it home to her little baby-brother, all at once a soft shadow fell upon the water, and the scented wind blew her smooth hair all into her eyes, and as she put up both hands in a hurry to pull it away, she ...
— Stories of Childhood • Various

... cause, the services of a waiter are desired, catch his eye quietly, and on his approach, state your own or the lady's wishes, in a low tone of voice. This same rule of conduct will apply to public places, where the knocking of spoons against cups, and other noisy attempts to gain the attention ...
— Social Life - or, The Manners and Customs of Polite Society • Maud C. Cooke

... Alcayde, he waits for me at home, And will not take his tumbler until Zorayda come. I cannot bring him water,—the pitcher is in pieces; And so I'm sure to catch it, 'cos he wallops ...
— Library Of The World's Best Literature, Ancient And Modern, Vol 3 • Various



Words linked to "Catch" :   baseball, latch, detent, contend, take, board, catch a glimpse, control, hoard, seizure, capture, catch cold, ensnare, roll up, hook, listen, trip, compile, nett, catch out, physical object, indefinite quantity, snap, surprise, drawback, touching, understand, fascinate, retake, pull, draw, dog, restraint, rebound, hunt, hit, trammel, hold, meshing, tripper, fish, get a line, conflagrate, suffer, get on, catch some Z's, discover, harpoon, catcher, click, haul, grownup, curb, constraint, enamour, snare, doorstop, pull in, take fire, bewitch, appeal, intercept, manner of speaking, delivery, change, delay, trip up, contract, ache, check, holdfast, learn, witness, hasp, visualize, run, ignite, gaining control, collect, fastening, beguile, attract, get word, comprehend, match, hood latch, accumulate, game, pawl, moderate, reception, lasso, doorstopper, mesh, propagate, hunt down, adult, fixing, bench hook, clutch, fastener, hitch, find out, enchant, grab, batfowl, receive, hold up, draw in, interlock, captivate, spread, seize, bag, visualise, hear, entrap, catch phrase, get wind, interception, stop, combust, track down, interlocking, attach, by-catch, recapture, preview, amass, catch up, perceive, find, hurt, baseball game, rope, snag, see, speech, compete, vie, pile up, overtake, net, work, erupt, frog, rat, play, enamor, spectate, reproduce, shoestring catch, object, contain, detain, acquire, catch sight, prehend, hold in, unhitch, trap, touch



Copyright © 2019 e-Free Translation.com