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Herb

noun
1.
A plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests.  Synonym: herbaceous plant.
2.
Aromatic potherb used in cookery for its savory qualities.



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"Herb" Quotes from Famous Books



... Sanger now became a member of their household. Her grandmother was an herb-doctor in great repute. She had frequently been denounced as a witch, although in good standing as a Catholic. This girl had picked up some herb-lore, and one day when all the family were visiting the cemetery she darted into various copses ...
— Two Little Savages • Ernest Thompson Seton

... pursuits. Printer, postmaster, almanac maker, essayist, chemist, orator, tinker, statesman, humorist, philosopher, parlor man, political economist, professor of housewifery, ambassador, projector, maxim-monger, herb-doctor, wit:—Jack of all trades, master of each and mastered by none—the type and genius of his land. Franklin was everything but a poet. But since a soul with many qualities, forming of itself a sort ...
— Israel Potter • Herman Melville

... come and show you," said Morva. "Here is mother," and Sara approached from her herb ...
— Garthowen - A Story of a Welsh Homestead • Allen Raine

... me point out that this story and Mr. Clouston's appeared simultaneously in serial form in their respective magazines. This proves, I think, that at these cross-roads, at any rate, there has been no dirty work. All right, Herb., you can let 'em ...
— The Girl on the Boat • Pelham Grenville Wodehouse

... physician of you. Whenever you are called to a sick person, I will take care and show myself to you. If I stand at the foot of the bed, say boldly, 'I will soon restore you to health,' and give the patient a little herb that I will point out to you, and he will soon be well. If, however, I stand at the head of the sick person, he is mine; then say, 'All help is ...
— Folk-lore and Legends: German • Anonymous

... reclamation of the desert that Oxley could not take into his calculations—for he did not know its power—the sure, if gradual change wrought by stocking. Under the ceaseless tread of myriad hoofs, the loose, open soil was to become firm and hard, whilst fresh growths of herb and grass followed the footsteps of the invading herds. The shaking bogs and morasses were to become solidified, and the waters that permeated them to retreat into well defined chains of ponds and lagoons. This the first ...
— The History of Australian Exploration from 1788 to 1888 • Ernest Favenc

... many writers, who have endeavored to shed new light on the origin and early history of this singular plant. Upwards of three hundred volumes have been written, embracing works in nearly all of the languages of Europe, concerning the herb and the various methods of using it. Most writers have confined themselves to the commercial history of the plant; while others have written upon its medicinal properties and the various modes of preparing ...
— Tobacco; Its History, Varieties, Culture, Manufacture and Commerce • E. R. Billings

... to the army, and the Tory physician had departed to the British lines. But, as is well known, the women in the early days of New Jersey were often obliged to be physicians; and among the good housewives of Burlington, who knew all about herb teas, homemade plasters, and potions, Mrs. Morris held a high position. The sick Continentals were told that she was just as good as a doctor, and, besides, was a very kind woman, always ready to help the ...
— The Junior Classics • Various

... a cup of such quality was the proper receptacle for the yellow, herb-flavoured spirits, so was the character of Wan such that all blessing must ...
— The Shih King • James Legge

... we joined battle, praying to Jove and to Minerva, and when the fight had begun, I was the first to kill my man and take his horses—to wit the warrior Mulius. He was son-in-law to Augeas, having married his eldest daughter, golden-haired Agamede, who knew the virtues of every herb which grows upon the face of the earth. I speared him as he was coming towards me, and when he fell headlong in the dust, I sprang upon his chariot and took my place in the front ranks. The Epeans fled in all directions when they saw the ...
— The Iliad • Homer

... a great many to be turned and made over in Deephaven, and she went to the Carews' and Lorimers' at house-cleaning time or in seasons of great festivity. She had no equal in sickness, and knew how to brew every old-fashioned dose and to make every variety of herb-tea, and when her nursing was put to an end by her patient's death, she was commander-in-chief at the funeral, and stood near the doorway to direct the mourning friends to their seats; and I have no reason to doubt that ...
— Deephaven and Selected Stories & Sketches • Sarah Orne Jewett

... and my familiar haunts Seemed new to me. Nor was I slow to come Among them, when the clouds, from their still skirts, Had shaken down on earth the feathery snow, And all was white. The pure keen air abroad, Albeit it breathed no scent of herb, nor heard Love-call of bird nor merry hum of bee, Was not the air of death, Bright mosses crept Over the spotted trunks, and the close buds, That lay along the boughs, instinct with life, Patient, and waiting the soft breath of Spring, Feared not the piercing ...
— Poetical Works of William Cullen Bryant - Household Edition • William Cullen Bryant

... music conveys, yet quite as delicious. One might say that they seem to talk together; but they do not think as we think or dream as we dream—not even symbolically. It will be long ere you appreciate more than their fresh joy of existence. But, little by little one herb and flower after the other becomes individualized—they are artists living themselves out into hues and lines and parts of a tableau; the vine draws itself in an arabesque which is perfect because self-forming; and the whole harmonize with the sway of sunlight and shadow, ...
— The Continental Monthly , Vol. 2 No. 5, November 1862 - Devoted to Literature and National Policy • Various

... Asdente,[4] who now would wish he had attended to his leather and his thread, but late repents. See the forlorn women who left the needle, the spool, and the spindle, and became fortune-tellers; they wrought spells with herb ...
— The Divine Comedy, Volume 1, Hell [The Inferno] • Dante Alighieri

... scorching leagues of trampled grain, Half-stunned, half-blinded, by the trudge of feet And dusty smother of the August heat, He dreamt of flowers in an English lane, Of hedgerow flowers glistening after rain— All-heal and willow-herb and meadow-sweet. ...
— A Treasury of War Poetry - British and American Poems of the World War 1914-1917 • Edited, with Introduction and Notes, by George Herbert Clarke

... drinking glass after glass, so that Olga Mihalovna scarcely had time to fill them. One jocular young man sipped his tea through a lump of sugar, and kept saying, "Sinful man that I am, I love to indulge myself with the Chinese herb." He kept asking with a heavy sigh: "Another tiny dish of tea more, if you please." He drank a great deal, nibbled his sugar, and thought it all very amusing and original, and imagined that he was doing a clever imitation of a Russian merchant. None of them understood that ...
— The Party and Other Stories • Anton Chekhov

... this knowledge is still preserved amongst their descendants, and considered efficacious. For every illness there is an herb, for every accident a remedy. Baths are in constant use, although these temezcallis are confined to the Indians. In every family there is some knowledge of simple medicine, very necessary, in haciendas especially, where no physician can possibly ...
— Life in Mexico • Frances Calderon De La Barca

... feet in dewy freshness, it made a green link between the herb-garden of St. Mildred's and the highway of the Watling Street. Like the straggling hedges that were half buried under a net of wild roses, red and white, the path was half effaced by grass; but beyond, her eye could follow the straight line of the great Roman ...
— The Ward of King Canute • Ottilie A. Liljencrantz

... mustard (Sinapis nigra); besides which, its structure presents all the essentials to sustain the illustration sought to be established in the parable, some of which are wanting or dubious in the common plant, It has a very small seed; it may be sown in a garden: it grows into an "herb," and eventually "becometh a tree; so that the birds of the air come and lodge in the branches thereof." With every allowance for the extremest development attainable by culture, it must be felt that the dimensions of the domestic sinapis scarcely justify the last illustration; besides which ...
— Ceylon; an Account of the Island Physical, Historical, and • James Emerson Tennent

... this manner. Those skilful in such arts mix common oil with a certain herb, keep it a long time and when the mixture is completed they thicken it with a material derived from some natural source, like a thicker oil. The material being a liquor produced in Persia, and called, as I have already said, naphtha in ...
— The Roman History of Ammianus Marcellinus • Ammianus Marcellinus

... in tormenting her, I had some boisterous doubts. For, hearing that an hour or two previous she had been partaking of some twenty unripe bananas, I rather fancied that that circumstance might have had something to do with her sufferings. But however it was, all the herb-leeches on the island would not have altered her own opinions on ...
— Mardi: and A Voyage Thither, Vol. I (of 2) • Herman Melville

... And bring all Heaven before mine eyes. And may at last my weary age Find out the peaceful hermitage, The hairy gown and mossy cell, Where I may sit, and rightly spell Of every star that heaven doth shew, And every herb that sips the dew; Till old experience do attain To something like prophetic strain. These pleasures, Melancholy, give, And I with ...
— The Hundred Best English Poems • Various

... to drink. It is overhung with alders, and two or three stand on separate little islands held together by roots. The winter floods biting into the banks have cut miniature cliffs, and at their base grow the forget-me-not, the willow-herb, and flowering rush. A brightly-plumaged bird, too swift to be recognised—could it be a kingfisher?—darts along the margin of the stream and disappears in its black shadows. The wind blows gently from the west: it is just strong enough to show the silver sides of the ...
— More Pages from a Journal • Mark Rutherford

... cup; of odd saucers she had plenty, serving as plates when occasion required. Half an ounce of tea and a quarter of a pound of butter went far to absorb her morning's wages; but this was an unusual occasion. In general, she used herb-tea for herself, when at home, unless some thoughtful mistress made a present of tea-leaves from her more abundant household. The two chairs drawn out for visitors, and duly swept and dusted; an old board arranged with some skill upon two old candle boxes set on end (rather rickety to ...
— Mary Barton • Elizabeth Gaskell

... The keeper to the Princess Ishtar said: "Withhold thy speech! or Allat's fury dread! To her I go to bid thee welcome here." To Allat then the keeper doth appear: "Thy sister Ishtar the dark waters seeks— The Queen of Heaven," thus Allat's fury breaks. "So like an herb uprooted comes this Queen, To sting me as an asp doth Ishtar mean? What can her presence bring to me but hate? Doth Heaven's Queen thus come infuriate?" And Ishtar thus replies: "The fount I seek, Where I ...
— Babylonian and Assyrian Literature • Anonymous

... a little place where a tiny stream flowed into the lake, with reeds and flowery marsh of pink willow herb, and a gravelly bank to the side. Here they ran delicately ashore, with their frail boat, the two girls took off their shoes and stockings and went through the water's edge to the grass. The tiny ripples of ...
— Women in Love • D. H. Lawrence

... the shepherd boy in "The Pilgrim's Progress," with the "herb called Heart's Ease" in her bosom. She opened her eyes next morning from the depths of Mrs. Mason's best feather bed, and looked wonderingly about the room, with all its unaccustomed surroundings. She heard the rattle of fire-irons and the flatter of dishes below; the ...
— The Story Of Waitstill Baxter • By Kate Douglas Wiggin

... Silent as scent, perhaps thou chariotest Mab or King Oberon; or, haply, her His queen, Titania, on some midnight quest.— Oh for the herb, the magic euphrasy, That should unmask thee to mine eyes, ah me! And all that world at which my ...
— Poems • Madison Cawein

... female. And God blessed them, and said: Be fruitful and multiply, and replenish the earth, and subdue it: and have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over every living thing that moveth upon the face of the earth. And God said, Behold, I have given unto you every herb bearing seed, which is upon the face of all the earth, and every tree with seed-fruits: to you it shall be for food: and to every beast of the earth and to every fowl of the air, and to everything that creepeth upon the earth, wherein there is life, I have given the ...
— Prolegomena to the History of Israel • Julius Wellhausen

... grooms had disappeared and left the looped traces dangling from their collars. She had followed Florimel from Portlossie—to Edinburgh, and then to London, but not yet had seen how to approach her with probable advantage. In the meantime she had renewed old relations with a certain herb doctor in Kentish Town, at whose house she was now accommodated. There she had already begun to entice the confidences of maid servants, by use of what evil knowledge she had, and pretence to more, giving herself out as a wise woman. Her faith never failed her that, if she but kept handling the ...
— The Marquis of Lossie • George MacDonald

... boy had grown up, his godfather one day appeared and bade him go with him. He led him forth into a forest, and showed him a herb which grew there, and said, "Now shalt thou receive thy godfather's present. I make thee a celebrated physician. When thou art called to a patient, I will always appear to thee. If I stand by the head of the sick man, thou mayst say with confidence that thou wilt make him well ...
— Household Tales by Brothers Grimm • Grimm Brothers

... Christ: I have heard of Thee and the cures wrought by Thee without herb or medicine, for it is reported that Thou restoreth sight to the blind and maketh the lame to walk, cleanseth the leper, raiseth the dead, chaseth out devils and unclean spirits, and healeth those that are tormented of diseases of a long ...
— Primitive Psycho-Therapy and Quackery • Robert Means Lawrence

... well with honey and herb Sweet as the mead our fathers drank, and dreamed Their gods so drank in heaven—draughts deep and strong As life is strong and death is deep. I go ...
— Rosamund, Queen of the Lombards • Algernon Charles Swinburne

... loaves for their weight in silver. And when they tried vegetables and roots, they found such as are commonly eaten very scarce, so that they were constrained to venture upon any they could get, and, among others, they chanced upon an herb that was mortal, first taking away all sense and understanding. He that had eaten of it remembered nothing in the world, and employed himself only in moving great stones from one place to another, which he did with as much earnestness and industry ...
— Plutarch's Lives • A.H. Clough

... single inch of the pasture but would have fallen under the eye of some one of them. It was a most tedious business, not more than half a dozen shoots of garlic being discoverable in the whole field; yet such was the herb's pungency that probably one bite of it by one cow had been sufficient to season the whole dairy's ...
— Tess of the d'Urbervilles - A Pure Woman • Thomas Hardy

... shed or room where the air will get at them on all sides. Be sure they are dry and not moist when you cut or pick them, and free them from dirt and decayed leaves. After they are entirely dried out, put them in paper bags upon which you have written the name of the herb and the date of tying it up. Hang them where the air is dry and there is no chance ...
— Practical Suggestions for Mother and Housewife • Marion Mills Miller

... the searcher must, according to the Roman as well as the Germanic custom, appear without upper garment merely in his shirt; and especially in the primitive Latin formula for declaring war, in which we meet with two symbols occurring at least also among the Celts and the Germans—the "pure herb" (-herba pura-, Franconian -chrene chruda-) as a symbol of the native soil, and the singed bloody staff as a sign of commencing war. But with a few exceptions, in which reasons of religion protected the ancient usages—to which class the -confarreatio- ...
— The History of Rome (Volumes 1-5) • Theodor Mommsen

... nothing extraordinary in it; but the circumstances had something peculiarly expressive of God's providence, which makes the question proper in this place. Pliny observes, that the hind with young is by instinct directed to a certain herb called Seselis, which facilitates the birth. Thunder also (which looks like the more immediate hand of Providence) has the same effect. Ps. xxix. In so early an age to observe these things, may style our ...
— The Poetical Works of Edward Young, Volume 2 • Edward Young

... on one side of the river, we were all obliged to march on the other. Where the stream was precipitated from the hills, channels had been cut to lead the water into gardens and plantations of fruit-trees: In these gardens we found an herb which had never been brought down to the water-side, and which we perceived the inhabitants eat raw. I tasted it, and found it pleasant, its flavour somewhat resembling that of the West Indian spinnage, called Calleloor, though its leaf was very different. The ground ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Vol. 12 • Robert Kerr

... teachings of our Lord. How he must have considered the lilies of the field, and that such a tiny seed as that of the mustard could have produced so great an herb, and noticed and thought on the thorns and the tares and the wheat, and watched the sparrows, and pondered and wondered how the birds were fed. All his teaching was drawn from Nature. And all the study in the world could never have taught him what he knew, if it had not ...
— The Whence and the Whither of Man • John Mason Tyler

... grasshoppers sailing northward from the great Utah desert in the United States, alighted late in the afternoon of one day and in the morning fields of grain, gardens with their promise, and every herb in the Settlement were gone, and a waste like a blasted hearth remained behind. The event was more than a loss of their crops, it seemed a heaven-struck blow upon their community, and it is said they lifted up their eyes to heaven, weeping and despairing. The sole return of their labors for ...
— The Romantic Settlement of Lord Selkirk's Colonists - The Pioneers of Manitoba • George Bryce

... to-day to weed out mammy's herb-garden. He keeps it neat as a pin, but has his fun out of it all the same. It is right under the window, where she can see growing her saffron and sage, peppermint, cumfrey, and all the rest. I don't know the names of half. Frederic calls them "health-root," "lullaby-root," ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 18, No. 108, October, 1866 • Various

... somewhere, as if by magic, and was told by the good mother to prepare a chicken, that she might make broth for the sick young man, pointing to where I lay. For two hours that good mother worked over me, now and then giving me draughts of hot herb tea, while the daughter deftly prepared nature's wild bird of the prairie, occasionally shooting darts of sympathy from her jet black eyes. When the bird had been cooked, the meat and bones were removed leaving only the broth which ...
— Dangers of the Trail in 1865 - A Narrative of Actual Events • Charles E Young

... language signifies sea, and suf is the name of a plant in AEthiopia, from which the Abyssins extract a beautiful crimson; whether this be the same with the gouesmon, I know not, but am of opinion that the herb gives to this sea both the colour ...
— A Voyage to Abyssinia • Jerome Lobo

... black-speckled green eyes was in reality making a study of his client. When at length she came to a stand and looked to him to speak, he was seized with a fit of the complaint known as a "churchyard cough," and had recourse to an earthenware basin half full of herb ...
— Cousin Pons • Honore de Balzac

... were grazing in various portions of the uncultivated plain. At first sight they appeared to be only searching for food among the stones and dust, but upon close examination I found a peculiar fleshy herb something like the stone-crop which grows upon the old walls and rocks of England. This plant was exceedingly salt, and the sheep devoured it with avidity, and were in fair condition. The wool was long, but of a coarse wiry texture, and much impaired by the adherence of thistles and other prickly ...
— Cyprus, as I Saw it in 1879 • Sir Samuel W. Baker

... a viol, and learned to play on it; till they would have married her one day to a rich king of Paynim, and she stole forth by night, and came to the seaport, and dwelt with a poor woman thereby. Then took she a certain herb, and therewith smeared her head and her face, till she was all brown and stained. And she had a coat, and mantle, and smock, and breeches made, and attired herself as if she had been a minstrel. So took she the viol and went to a mariner, and so wrought on him that he took her aboard his vessel. ...
— The Best of the World's Classics, Restricted to Prose, Vol. VII (of X)—Continental Europe I • Various

... Corchorus Japonicus of Japan, and the Corchorus Mompoxensis used in Panama for making a kind of tea, while one variety of jute plant is referred to in the book of job as the Jew's Mallow; this variety C. Olitorius, has been used in the East from time immemorial as a pot herb. ...
— The Jute Industry: From Seed to Finished Cloth • T. Woodhouse and P. Kilgour

... the serpent the hero finds a sword, "great and sharp," which he sends to the Sun goddess, at whose shrine in Ise it is subsequently found and given to the famous warrior, Yamato-dake, when he is setting out on his expedition against the Kumaso of the north. The sword is known as the "Herb-queller." Susanoo then builds for himself and Lady Wonderful a palace at Suga in Izumo, and composes a celebrated verse of Japanese poetry.* Sixth in descent from the offspring of this union is the "Kami of the great land," called also the "Great-Name Possessor," or the "Kami of the reed ...
— A History of the Japanese People - From the Earliest Times to the End of the Meiji Era • Frank Brinkley and Dairoku Kikuchi

... adoring the shrine; and it was on the sands of the desert she was lying. It chanced that the Chieftain of a desert tribe passed at midday by the spot, and seeing the figure of a damsel unshaded' by any shade of tree or herb or tent-covering, and prostrate on the sands, he reined his steed and leaned forward to her, and called to her. Then as she answered nothing he dismounted, and thrust his arm softly beneath her and lifted her gently; and her swoon had the whiteness of death, so that he thought her dead ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... morning, took a long walk through the grounds of Chatsworth, and cultivated healthful recreation. The after part of the day was devoted to study and composition. Like Sir Walter Raleigh, he was a devoted admirer of the "fragrant herb." Charles II.'s constant witticism, styled Hobbes as "a bear against whom the Church played their young dogs, in order to ...
— Ancient and Modern Celebrated Freethinkers - Reprinted From an English Work, Entitled "Half-Hours With - The Freethinkers." • Charles Bradlaugh, A. Collins, and J. Watts

... the good leaves there is hounds tongue. Wear it at the feet of you against dogs what be savage. Herb Benet you nail upon the door. No witch nor evil thing can ...
— Six Plays • Florence Henrietta Darwin

... Before the days of modern "cold pack" canning, mothers used to assemble their little home groups in the spring and, in spite of sundry hidings under tables on the part of reluctant Johnnies and Susies, dutifully portion out herb tea or sulphur in molasses. Spring cleaning could never stop short of "cleansing the blood!" And after a monotonous winter of salt pork and fried potatoes no doubt heroic measures were necessary to make up ...
— Everyday Foods in War Time • Mary Swartz Rose

... scattered by the plants themselves, as, for instance, those of many Geraniums, Violets, Balsams, Shamrocks, etc. Our little Herb Robert throws ...
— The Beauties of Nature - and the Wonders of the World We Live In • Sir John Lubbock

... blessing of the whole neighbourhood. To her friends there could be no greater comfort than Deborah. She was acquainted with medicine that cured almost every disease save that of old age. She knew all the healing qualities of every herb that grew in the neighbourhood. Deborah was doctor and nurse to all the people round about. Fever, colds, ague, rheumatics, scarlatina, jaundice, bile; Deborah could cure them all, and a dozen diseases besides. But this was not all. What she could not cure by her medicine she could by her charms, ...
— Roger Trewinion • Joseph Hocking

... Your herb-snuff and the four glasses are lying in my warehouse, but I can hear of no ship going to Paris. You are now at Fontainbleau, but not thinking of Francis I., the Queen of Sweden, and Monaldelschi. It is terrible that one cannot go to Courts that are gone! You have supped with the Chevalier de ...
— Letters of Horace Walpole - Volume II • Horace Walpole

... wainscot and pretty forest-work hangings. Lastly (for I omit all other particulars, and will end with that which I love most in both conditions), not whole woods cut in walks, nor vast parks, nor fountain or cascade gardens, but herb and flower and fruit gardens, which are more useful, and the water every whit as clear and wholesome as if it darted from the breasts of a marble nymph or the urn of a river-god. If for all this you like better the substance of ...
— Cowley's Essays • Abraham Cowley

... yearning and a formless, nameless pain had come to her the knowledge of the true herb needed for her healing. The unsated hunger for sympathy and love and loveliness, the loneliness that gnawed him, she comprehended now. And as she looked about her at the dainty, carefully-chosen furniture, and the exquisite old-world-patterned ...
— The Dop Doctor • Clotilde Inez Mary Graves

... of reverence and submission. He returned to shore. Again, and for a third time, he came out and went through the same ceremony; after which he brought a little basket of rushes, filled with an herb which is called there tambac, which he threw into the boat. Then he ...
— Under Drake's Flag - A Tale of the Spanish Main • G. A. Henty

... each of the combatants, by which oath they severally swore that the cause in which they were to fight was true, and that they did not deal in any witchcraft or magic art, by which they expected to gain the victory over their adversary; and also, that they had not about their persons any herb or stone, or charm of any kind, by which they hoped to ...
— Margaret of Anjou - Makers of History • Jacob Abbott

... Heal-all (from valere, to be well), grows abundantly throughout this country in moist woods, and on the banks of streams. It is a Benedicta, or blessed herb, being dedicated to the Virgin Mary, as preservative against poisons; and it bears the name of Capon's tail, from ...
— Herbal Simples Approved for Modern Uses of Cure • William Thomas Fernie

... the time of the 'herb Pantagruelion'!— Well, what were you doing on the canal at that hour?" asked ...
— Atlantic Monthly Vol. 6, No. 33, July, 1860 • Various

... at sunrise after a sacrifice to the earth as an expiation—perhaps because its surface was about to be disturbed. When it was rubbed on the body all wishes were gratified; it dispelled fevers and other maladies; it was an antidote against serpents; and it conciliated hearts. A branch of the dried herb used to asperge a banquet-hall made ...
— The Religion of the Ancient Celts • J. A. MacCulloch

... valuable the things that have been long established: so that our children will be less prodigal than their fathers in sacrificing good institutions to passionate impulses and impracticable theories. This herb of grace, let us hope, may be found in the old footprints ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 10, No. 57, July, 1862 - A Magazine Of Literature, Art, And Politics • Various

... surrounded with sense.' A man must have his sense to imitate him worthily. How we look through his words at the Deluge, as he floods it upon us in Book xi. l. 738-53!—The Attic bees produce honey so flavoured with the thyme of Hymettus that it is scarcely eatable, though to smell the herb itself in a breezy walk upon that celebrated Mount would be an exceeding pleasure; thus certain epic poems are overpoweringly flavoured with herbs of Milton, while yet the fragrant balm and fresh breeze of his poetry is not to be found ...
— The Prose Works of William Wordsworth • William Wordsworth

... some two centuries later, the pilgrimage had become a favourite occupation of the devout. Each awakening of the year, when the rains of April had laid the dust of March and aroused the buds of tree and herb from their winter slumber, the longing to go on a pilgrimage seized ...
— Inns and Taverns of Old London • Henry C. Shelley

... nothing can hold back from their errands of mercy. They find out the red-handed, gloveless undergraduate of bucolic antecedents, as he squirms in his corner, and distill their soft words upon him like dew upon the green herb. They reach even the poor relation, whose dreary apparition saddens the perfumed atmosphere of the sumptuous drawing-room. I have known one of these angels ask, of her own accord, that a desolate ...
— The Professor at the Breakfast Table • Oliver Wendell Holmes (Sr.)

... fennel herb, when ground, enters into the composition of some sachet powders. The oil of fennel, in conjunction with other aromatic oils, may be used for perfuming soap. It is procurable ...
— The Art of Perfumery - And Methods of Obtaining the Odors of Plants • G. W. Septimus Piesse

... me betray my sex? Would you have me forget his Phaedras and Sthenoboeas? No if I ever suffer any lines of that woman-hater, or his imitators, to be sung in my presence, may I sell herbs (The mother of Euripides was a herb-woman. This was a favourite topic of Aristophanes.) like his mother, and wear rags like his Telephus. (The hero of one of the lost plays of Euripides, who appears to have been brought upon the stage in the garb of ...
— The Miscellaneous Writings and Speeches of Lord Macaulay, Vol. 1 (of 4) - Contibutions to Knight's Quarterly Magazine] • Thomas Babington Macaulay

... each herb with restlesse leaves To th' starres doth strive and upward heaves: Remov'd from heaven they weep, the field appeares All o're dissolv'd in pious teares: The white-flowr'd Woodbine, and the blushing Rose Branch into th'aire with twining ...
— The Odes of Casimire, Translated by G. Hils • Mathias Casimire Sarbiewski

... Pacific Herb, thy sensuous plea The bristling clans of Adam sway At least to fellowship in thee! Before thine altar tribal flags are furled, Fain wouldst thou make one hearthstone ...
— John Marr and Other Poems • Herman Melville

... luxury. They slept all together in troops and companies, on beds of rushes which they themselves had picked on the banks of the Eurotas with their hands, for they were not allowed to use a knife. In winter they mixed the herb called lycophon with the rushes, as it is thought ...
— Plutarch's Lives, Volume I (of 4) • Plutarch

... returning a third time, he presented them, after his harangue was finished, with a kind of crown of black feathers, such as their kings wear upon their heads, and a basket of rushes, filled with a particular herb, both which he fastened to a short stick, and threw into the boat; nor could he be prevailed upon to receive any thing in return, though pushed towards him upon a board; only he took up a hat, which ...
— The Works of Samuel Johnson, Vol. 6 - Reviews, Political Tracts, and Lives of Eminent Persons • Samuel Johnson

... intersecting each other in every direction; and canst thou fancy those wheels arrested in their motion by some magic power—their rays retained, but their fires extinguished and their brightness gone? Then mayst thou conceive the curious beauty of this little herb—a plant so unlike all others that we would fain believe it the reanimated spirit of a race that flourished in former ages, with those hideous monsters whose bones alone remain to tell the history of their existence." It is quite true that in the cultivated Mamillarias there is nothing unsightly, ...
— Cactus Culture For Amateurs • W. Watson

... my comrades were carried to one place; here they made us sit down, and gave us a certain herb, which they made signs to us to eat. My comrades did not notice that the blacks took none of it themselves, and ate greedily. But I, suspecting some trick, would not so much as taste it, which happened well for me, for in a little ...
— The Children's Hour, v 5. Stories From Seven Old Favorites • Eva March Tappan

... my own natural conversational powers, which called out hers. Where? In the street, in the first place, where I was so fortunate as to meet her just as she had dropped one of a number of parcels of herb medicine she was carrying. I had the pleasure of picking it up for her, and of relieving her of some of her load. Thus I found out where she lived, and then took it upon myself to call again; but she hasn't ...
— The Brother Clerks - A Tale of New-Orleans • Xariffa

... vainly men themselves amaze To win the palm, the oak, or bays, And their incessant labours see Crown'd from some single herb or tree, Whose short and narrow-verged shade Does prudently their toils upbraid; While all the flowers and trees do close To weave the ...
— The Golden Treasury - Of the Best Songs and Lyrical Poems in the English Language • Various

... midst of the pleasant bustle Hamish fell ill. It was not much, they all thought—a cold only, which proved rather obstinate and withstood all the mild attempts made with herb-drinks and applications to remove it. But they were not alarmed about it. Even when the doctor was sent for, even when he came again of his own accord, and yet again, they were not much troubled. For Hamish had been ...
— Shenac's Work at Home • Margaret Murray Robertson

... who say there are four Kinds of this at Mexico, have no better Foundation for the difference than this; and Mons. Tournefort had reason to say after Father Plumier, that he only knew one Kind of this Tree. Cacao Speciem Unicam novi. Append. Rei Herb. pag. 660. ...
— The Natural History of Chocolate • D. de Quelus

... or Clear Valley. His rule was fiercely severe because he himself loved hardships and rough fare. "It in no way befits religion," he writes, "to seek remedies for the body, nor is it good for health either. You may now and then take some cheap herb,—such as poor men may,—and this is done sometimes. But to buy drugs, to hunt up doctors, to take doses, is unbecoming to religion and hostile to purity." His success in winning men to the monastic life was almost phenomenal. It was said that ...
— A Short History of Monks and Monasteries • Alfred Wesley Wishart

... in its wild state; and many, very many more who are wholly unacquainted with the peculiar and interesting structure of this fruit and its allies—the raspberry, blackberry, dewberry, and their congeners. The plant which bears the strawberry, whether the wild or garden species, is an herb with three-partite leaves, notched at the edge with a pair of largo membraneous stipules at their base. When growing, this plant throws out two kinds of shoots—one called runners, which lie prostrate on the ground, and end in a tuft ...
— Chambers's Edinburgh Journal, No. 462 - Volume 18, New Series, November 6, 1852 • Various

... at five o'clock to tea, and found himself alone next a group of women, mostly Swedes or Danish or Dutch, drinking a peculiar brown herb-brew which tasted like nothing else on earth, and eating two thick bits of darkish bread smeared with a brown smear which hoped it was jam, but hoped in vain. Unhappily he sat in the gilt and red, massively ornate ...
— Aaron's Rod • D. H. Lawrence

... farther eastward, into a little bay surrounded by a romantic landscape, where Vancouver formerly lay, and which is perfectly safe at all seasons: the Spaniards have named this bay Herba buena, after a sweet-smelling herb ...
— A New Voyage Round the World, in the years 1823, 24, 25, and 26, Vol. 2 • Otto von Kotzebue

... later. And why should he go to seek advice when he does not expect to find health? That were a vain toil! I feel my own ill so heavy a burden that never shall I find healing for it by medicine or by potion or by herb or by root. There is not a remedy for every ill: mine is so rooted that it cannot be cured. Cannot? Methinks I have lied. As soon as I first felt this evil, if I had dared to reveal and to tell it, I could have spoken to a leech, who could have helped me in ...
— Cliges: A Romance • Chretien de Troyes

... of heated pincers; when, in short, like an immovable rock, they receive and break all the billows of the most bitter sufferings at the hands of the executioner, and, like those who have eaten the Sardinian herb, die laughing? The lamentable sight of such incredible constancy as this created no little doubt in the minds not only of the simple, but of men of authority. For they could not believe that cause ...
— The Rise of the Hugenots, Vol. 1 (of 2) • Henry Martyn Baird

... World, but Nature is in continual Movement. The Sea, which o'er flows the Sands has its Bounds set, which it cannot pass, which the Moment it has reached, without abiding, returns back to the Bottom of the Deep. Every Herb, every Shrub and Tree, and even our own Bodies, teach us this Lesson, that nothing is durable, or can be counted upon. Time passes away insensibly, one Sun follows another, and brings its Changes with it. To-Day's Globe of Light sees you strengthened by these Europeans ...
— Of Captain Mission • Daniel Defoe

... first is in swine, but not in cow. My second is in quarrel, but not in row. My third is in rip, but not in tear. My fourth is in pretty, but not in fair. My fifth is in herb, but not in root. My sixth is in inch, but not in foot. My seventh is in rake, but not in hoe. My eighth is in yes, but not in no. My whole is ...
— Harper's Young People, April 6, 1880 - An Illustrated Weekly • Various

... that mirth would come for asking; others, grown brutal by being caged, made up in noise what they lacked in peace. How comfortless they seemed! The only solace that the eye could trace was the odious herb, tobacco! ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 1, Complete • Various

... quite pale. She sat looking straight before her with a strange expression. She was tasting in the very depths of her soul a bitterness which was more biting than any bitter herb which ever grew on earth. It was a bitterness, which, thank God, is unknown to many; the bitterness of the envy of an incapable, but self-seeking nature, of one with the burning ambition of genius but destitute of the divine fire. To such come unholy torture, which is unspeakable at the knowledge ...
— The Butterfly House • Mary E. Wilkins Freeman

... pleasure here a space, Not of compulsion or necessity. K. Edw. Leicester, if gentle words might comfort me, Thy speeches long ago had eas'd my sorrows, For kind and loving hast thou always been. The griefs of private men are soon allay'd; But not of kings. The forest deer, being struck, Runs to an herb that closeth up the wounds: But when the imperial lion's flesh is gor'd, He rends and tears it with his wrathful paw, [And], highly scorning that the lowly earth Should drink his blood, mounts up to the air: And so it fares with me, whose dauntless mind Th' ambitious Mortimer would ...
— Edward II. - Marlowe's Plays • Christopher Marlowe

... abundant rain, The nightly dews might fall, And the herb that keepeth life in man Might yet have ...
— De La Salle Fifth Reader • Brothers of the Christian Schools

... syl.), a sorceress who metamorphosed the companions of Ulysses into swine. Ulysses resisted the enchantment by means of the herb moly, given ...
— Character Sketches of Romance, Fiction and the Drama, Vol 1 - A Revised American Edition of the Reader's Handbook • The Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D.

... courtesy of Mr. R. Bowdler Sharpe F.L.S.—of the new style of mounting of the future, i.e. pairs of birds their nests and young, surrounded with carefully-modelled foliage and accessories. I there saw a bunch of "willow-herb" magnificently modelled. I was pleased, however, from an artist's point of view, to discover that we in Leicester could give them a "Roland for an Oliver" in our white-throats, together with their nest and young, surrounded ...
— Practical Taxidermy • Montagu Browne

... like a wall. On the other side of it was a space the size of an amphitheatre, a large part of it spread with soft green grass, like a carpet, and the rest of the floor scattered with low shrubs and big tussocks. Amongst them was a herb giving out a fragrance, when the feet crushed it, like that of wild thyme. The whole air seemed filled with a ...
— Lady Bridget in the Never-Never Land • Rosa Praed

... angry discussion took place between Oberon and Titania as to which of them was to have the little changeling boy. They parted in rage, Oberon threatening to torment Titania. Oberon summoned Puck to attend him, and bring the herb he once showed him, the juice of which, laid on sleeping eyelids, made man or woman dote upon the next creature seen. Having this herb's juice, Oberon would watch Titania when she was asleep, and drop the liquor into ...
— The Mysteries of All Nations • James Grant

... his breast, and answered, 'Alack, alack, thou art mad, or hast eaten of some poisonous herb, for the soul is the noblest part of man, and was given to us by God that we should nobly use it. There is no thing more precious than a human soul, nor any earthly thing that can be weighed with it. It is worth all the gold that is in the world, and is more ...
— A House of Pomegranates • Oscar Wilde

... of the sensitive plant, called by the Marquesans teita hakaina, the Modest Herb. A wide glade in a curve of the mountains was filled with a sea of it, and my companions delighted in dashing through its curiously nervous leafage, that shuddered and folded its feathery sprays together at their touch. If shocked ...
— White Shadows in the South Seas • Frederick O'Brien

... make a secret mark on it, and I will give it you back turned into gold. But the matter must not go further. And then you will no longer question my chance of discovering the elixir of life. Only I should like to punish that beggarly vagrant, that rascally herb-culler, and pitiful conjuror, as he deserves. Let him only come for once into my quarters! With all his contemptible jugglery, I would astound him! I am so enraged with the fellow, the blood runs into my head at ...
— The Old Man of the Mountain, The Lovecharm and Pietro of Abano - Tales from the German of Tieck • Ludwig Tieck

... girl has scarce been a week, nay, a day in her service, but a committee of servant-wenches are appointed to examine her, who advise her to raise her wages, or give warning; to encourage her to which, the herb- woman, or chandler-woman, or some other old intelligencer, provides her a place of four or five pounds a year; this sets madam cock-a-hoop, and she thinks of nothing now but vails and high wages, and so gives warning from place to place, till ...
— Everybody's Business is Nobody's Business • Daniel Defoe

... do, sir?" responded the youth gravely. "It's the old Spanish title of the first settlement here. It comes from the name that Father Junipero Serra gave to the pretty little vine that grows wild over the sandhills, and means 'good herb.' He called it 'A balm for the wounded ...
— A Ward of the Golden Gate • Bret Harte

... gross Example, how many Creatures are there which dye absolutely in the water, so that no life is left therein, but so soon as the pleasant Summer appears, the natural heat gives a new life, & the Body quite restored in the same substance as it was before in its living Motion; even as an Herb, which dies in the Winter, but in the Spring it manifests it self anew. The death of these things is to be esteemed natural, but the return of a new life in its knowledge is supernatural; but because we are accustomed to all these things, the least part of ...
— Of Natural and Supernatural Things • Basilius Valentinus

... and the water to the river, and the river to the shining sea; and the dew-drop which fell from heaven shall rise to heaven again, shaking off the dust-grains which weighed it down, thawed from the earth-frost which chained it here to herb and sward, upward and upward ever through stars and suns, through gods, and through the parents of the gods, purer and purer through successive lives, till it enters The Nothing, which is The All, and finds its home ...
— Hypatia - or, New Foes with an Old Face • Charles Kingsley

... and call it tabak; the last words, "yukal lehn tabaku," are no doubt a modern addition by those who had heard of tambako (the Romaic [Greek: tanpakon]). As the use of hashish or hashishah (the herb), more completely hashishata fukara, i.e. Monk's Wort, a technical term for hemp, chewed as a narcotic by fakirs (monks), was not known till A.H. 608 (A.D. 1211), it could not be mentioned in the Koran unless Mohammed were, as Sale observes, ...
— Notes and Queries, Number 77, April 19, 1851 • Various

... H. Quaodrangulum, and H. Perforatum, Spergula Arvensis (corn spurrey), Saponaria Officinalis (common soap wort), Drosera Rotundifolia (round-leaved sundew), D. Intermedia (intermediate variety), Epilobium Macrocarpum (long-fruited willow herb), E. Parviflorum (small flowered do.). E. Palustre (marsh do.), Circœa Lutetiana (enchanter’s night-shade), Pimpinella Magna (greater burnet saxifrage), Valeriana Sambucifolia (elder-leaved valerian), Solidago Virgaunea (golden rod), Gnaphalium Sylvaticum (high land ...
— Records of Woodhall Spa and Neighbourhood - Historical, Anecdotal, Physiographical, and Archaeological, with Other Matter • J. Conway Walter

... army consisted of a hundred thousand, besides the scouts and engineers, together with the auxiliaries, amongst whom were eighty thousand Hippogypi, and twenty thousand who were mounted on the Lachanopteri; {85a} these are very large birds, whose feathers are of a kind of herb, and whose wings look like lettuces. Next to these stood the Cinchroboli, {85b} and the Schorodomachi. {85c} Our allies from the north were three thousand Psyllotoxotae {85d} and five thousand Anemodromi; {85e} the former take their names from the fleas ...
— Trips to the Moon • Lucian

... so many people really like mignonette as profess to do so, it has such a caviare-to-the-general odor. The popular taste here would seem really guided by a fashion of fastidiousness. But the lemon verbena—which, if not a flower, is so high-bred an herb that it deserves to be considered one—one can easily see why that is valued. What a refined, spirituelle smell it has? Hypatia might have worn it, or Lady Jane Grey—or better still, Mrs. Browning's Lady Geraldine might have plucked it in the pauses of the ...
— The Continental Monthly, Vol. 6, No 4, October, 1864 - Devoted To Literature And National Policy • Various



Words linked to "Herb" :   chaenactis, goat's rue, Cassia marilandica, caryophyllaceous plant, Abyssinian banana, chamois cress, green gentian, digitalis, Amsinckia grandiflora, achillea, garden balm, cultivated carrot, Bowiea volubilis, Guinea pepper, American ginseng, Atropa belladonna, Glycyrrhiza lepidota, Ballota nigra, dragon's head, celeriac, Greek clover, Cichorium intybus, Egyptian henbane, Dictamnus alba, bar-room plant, Eupatorium capillifolium, Dicentra cucullaria, day lily, fraxinella, angelique, Anthriscus sylvestris, black henbane, herb garden, German chamomile, Dutchman's breeches, catnip, American gentian, corn salad, feabane mullet, cleome, apple of Peru, Fumaria officinalis, glasswort, Berteroa incana, goosefoot, anchusa, Collinsonia canadensis, common cockscomb, Halogeton glomeratus, calamint, blowball, goldenseal, astrantia, coriander plant, dragonhead, benny, Asparagus setaceous, Dicentra spectabilis, cow parsnip, fumewort, false saffron, herb bennet, bugle, arugula, Aureolaria virginica, bloodwort, flame flower, button snakeroot, bog hemp, fiesta flower, costusroot, Eruca vesicaria sativa, cruciferous plant, Anthemis nobilis, Coriandrum sativum, Aspidistra elatio, banana tree, Cnidoscolus urens, dog mercury, carrot, astilbe, false gromwell, herb doctor, dittany, Ensete ventricosum, bird's foot trefoil, ground cherry, elephant-tusk, gipsywort, brinjal, benne, feverfew, Gerardia pedicularia, common amsinckia, flame nettle, anise plant, tracheophyte, corn mayweed, Celosia argentea, earthnut, beetleweed, argemone, Eupatorium perfoliatum, golden ragwort, Anthyllis vulneraria, Dracocephalum parviflorum, Cephalotus follicularis, goat rue, Glaux maritima, amaranth, Cynoglossum officinale, Apium graveolens, Chinese forget-me-not, butter-flower, Antennaria plantaginifolia, Fagopyrum esculentum, breakstone, Curcuma domestica, barilla, Galega officinalis, fenugreek, agrimony, Asparagus plumosus, Eupatorium purpureum, galaxy, vascular plant, Ananas comosus, bells of Ireland, balsam herb, garden forget-me-not, beebalm, fetid horehound, cardamon, asclepiad, Emilia coccinea, geranium, burning bush, bloodroot, butterflower, fumeroot, dandelion, Diplotaxis tenuifolia, cumfrey, deer's-ears, fumitory, Aframomum melegueta, Curcuma longa, giant hyssop, Diplotaxis erucoides, cockscomb, Eryngium aquaticum, gumweed, Asarum shuttleworthii, dock, clammyweed, basil balm, bible leaf, Emilia sagitta, climbing onion, Diplotaxis muralis, campanula, Halogeton souda, giant buttercup, celandine, Chrysanthemum parthenium, devil nettle, Cape periwinkle, Galeopsis tetrahit, acanthus, Coptis groenlandica, bur reed, dead nettle, Australian pitcher plant, bush pea, gromwell, foamflower, Desmanthus ilinoensis, endive, gesneria, bladderpod, Eupatorium rugosum, beefsteak plant, Amaranthus spinosus, celery, gumbo, Dicentra canadensis, Anacyclus pyrethrum, Eranthis hyemalis, bishop's hat, bugleweed, Asparagus officinales, coltsfoot, devil's apples, benni, false rue anemone, cardamom, American liquorice, ayapana, black saltwort, garden egg, bedstraw, camomile, blue thistle, flame-flower, drypis, Anigozanthus manglesii, Clinopodium vulgare, edible asparagus, California yellow bells, Emilia flammea, Emilia javanica, crotalaria, chickweed, cultivated celery, bee balm, Apium graveolens dulce, butterweed, banana, bellflower, cottonweed, columbo, boys-and-girls, evening primrose, American licorice, gypsywort, asparagus, boneset, false foxglove, carnivorous plant, black salsify, Apium graveolens rapaceum, Gerardia virginica, flameflower, bird of paradise, dog's mercury, crucifer, devil's claw, Anethum graveolens, arnica, Australian sword lily, catmint, breadroot, Carthamus tinctorius, feverroot, clover, goldcup, Herb Simon, chicory plant, dayflower, black horehound, Celosia cristata, golden seal, Alexanders, crowfoot, Abelmoschus esculentus, esparcet, carrion flower, alecost, Acinos arvensis, ginger, deadly nightshade, creeping zinnia, garden rocket, galax, gall of the earth, cumin, heal all, canna, Haastia pulvinaris, gramineous plant, andryala, Galax urceolata, Cuminum cyminum, Eupatorium aya-pana, bergenia, butterbur, asparagus pea, alumbloom, cow parsley, coleus, clammy chickweed, Cynoglossum virginaticum, ginseng, buckwheat, celery root, alpine coltsfoot, Celosia argentea cristata, Borago officinalis, golden groundsel, grains of paradise, Darmera peltata, Elettaria cardamomum, eggplant bush, cupflower, bleeding heart, Eruca sativa, Chamaemelum nobilis, gas plant, coolwart, Guinea grains, false nettle, bog rhubarb, Coptis trifolia groenlandica, golden thread, Aureolaria pedicularia, Cichorium endivia, dagga, American pennyroyal, blue devil, gum plant, false rue, arum, false miterwort, Dalmatian pyrethrum, globe flower, chamomile, Eupatorium cannabinum, elsholtzia, aroid, eggplant, anise, graminaceous plant, Anthriscus cereifolium, Conopodium denudatum, cushion calamint, blue skullcap, globe thistle, St. Barbara's herb, blueweed, herbal, dog fennel, aspidistra, Ayapana triplinervis, cat's feet, Antennaria dioica, black archangel, chicory, Emmanthe penduliflora, dwarf nipplewort, belladonna plant, cast-iron plant, common devil's claw, common unicorn plant, herb robert, barrenwort, bishop's cap, Cape dagga, fringepod, baby blue-eyes, cayenne jasmine, agrimonia, agueweed, flannel leaf, Cakile maritima, burnet bloodwort, Glycyrrhiza glabra, deer's-ear, elephant's-foot, asparagus fern, Alexander, devil's fig, Cynoglossum amabile, blue pimpernel, beaked parsley, basil thyme, fleabane, herb Paris, Crambe maritima, globeflower, blessed thistle, camphor dune tansy, Frasera speciosa, foxglove, flax, Dalmatia pyrethrum, Armoracia rusticana, hawkweed, Epimedium grandiflorum, Descurainia pinnata, Carum carvi, belladonna, black lovage, Cacalia javanica, coreopsis, coral necklace, Eupatorium maculatum, aubergine, Daucus carota sativa, draba



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