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Perspire   /pərspˈaɪr/   Listen
Perspire

verb
(past & past part. perspired; pres. part. perspiring)
1.
Excrete perspiration through the pores in the skin.  Synonyms: sudate, sweat.






WordNet 3.0 © 2010 Princeton University








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"Perspire" Quotes from Famous Books



... and should they perspire, wipe them often, as the moisture penetrating the cotton and coming in contact with the plate, would cause streaks it would be difficult to remove. I will here remark that many operators use much more cotton ...
— American Handbook of the Daguerrotype • Samuel D. Humphrey

... high—it cannot be done by taking thought. No one can see more acutely and clearly, in more terrible and melancholy detail, than myself what one misses. Call it coldness, call it indifference, call it cowardice—the matter is not mended. If one is cold, one does not grow hot by pretending to perspire; if one is indifferent, one does not become enthusiastic by indulging in hollow rhetoric. If one is cowardly, one can only improve by facing a necessary danger, not by thrusting oneself into perilous situations. To marry without love, for ...
— The Silent Isle • Arthur Christopher Benson

... sound or sparkle, those who behave themselves upon every occasion, and would pass through a dynamite explosion without rumpling a hair; those who never have done anything out of the way and never will, simply for the same reason that a fish cannot perspire—no blood in 'em! Cut them and they would run cold sap, like a maple tree in April. Such people are always frightened to death for fear of what the world is going to say about them. They are under everlasting bonds to keep the peace. I wonder that they ever un-bend to kiss their children. If one ...
— A String of Amber Beads • Martha Everts Holden

... you fellows make a mistake," cautioned Captain Wadleigh. "Don't get a notion that you've nothing bigger than Welton to tackle this year. Next Saturday you've got to go up against Tottenville, and there's an eleven that will make you perspire." ...
— The High School Left End - Dick & Co. Grilling on the Football Gridiron • H. Irving Hancock

... night 'twas the same!—and the next;—and the next; He perspire'd like an ox; he was nervous, and vex'd; Week past after week; till, by weekly succession, His weakly ...
— Broad Grins • George Colman, the Younger

... respiration about 20, skin (conduction, radiation and evaporation) about 77. Hence it is clear the chief means of loss are the skin and the lungs. The more air that passes in and out of the lungs in a given time, the greater the loss of heat. And in such animals as the dog, who do not perspire easily by the skin, respiration becomes ...
— Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 2, Part 1, Slice 1 • Various

... a brilliant toga resplendent with purple, and respected also on account of the splendour of his household and number of his servants. There are certain statues placed in sacred edifices that seem to sink under their load, and almost to perspire, when in reality they are void of sensation, and do not contribute to the stony stability, so these men would wish to look like Atlases, when they are no better than statues of stone, insignificant scrubs, funguses, dolts, little different from stone. Meanwhile really learned men, endowed ...
— The Anatomy of Melancholy • Democritus Junior

... of roses. In a moment the car was invaded by the scent of flowers and fruit and of something else strange and new and very aromatic. The electric fans were set twirling, the black waiters began to perspire, the passengers called for cold things to eat, and the twins pulled off their ...
— Christopher and Columbus • Countess Elizabeth Von Arnim

... to require light as well as air; since plants which grow in windows on the inside of houses are equally sollicitous to turn the upper side of their leaves to the light. Vegetables at the same time exsude or perspire a great quantity from their leaves, as animals do from their lungs; this perspirable matter as it rises from their fine vessels, (perhaps much finer than the pores of animal skins,) is divided into inconcievable tenuity; and ...
— The Botanic Garden - A Poem in Two Parts. Part 1: The Economy of Vegetation • Erasmus Darwin

... too. She was becoming a real storehouse for blows. Coupeau had a cudgel, which he called his ass's fan, and he fanned his old woman. You should just have seen him giving her abominable thrashings, which made her perspire all over. She was no better herself, for she bit and scratched him. Then they stamped about in the empty room and gave each other such drubbings as were likely to ease them of all taste for bread for good. But Gervaise ended by not caring a fig for these thwacks, not ...
— L'Assommoir • Emile Zola

... Africa, and the pain which the natives will endure for what they call their pleasures. I wonder how much those men are paid for carrying that statue? They perspire pretty freely." ...
— South Wind • Norman Douglas

... began to perspire violently, and went behind her aunt's chair. I did not stir, as I was sure she would soon come back, putting her down in my own mind as very far removed from silliness or innocence either. I supposed she wished to affect what she did not possess. I was, moreover, delighted at ...
— The Memoires of Casanova, Complete • Jacques Casanova de Seingalt

... pricked up their ears. Their sudden zeal made them perspire. The priest's wife and the parish-school girl almost fainted from fright, but the girl at once recovered herself and began to get angry; she was now even more angry than she had been frightened a little while ago. Small ...
— The Created Legend • Feodor Sologub

... tint of the underlying skin, hence the name miliaria rubra. But gradually it becomes milky and opalescent, hence, the term miliaria alba. The vesicles of miliaria are generally solitary, and appear on those portions of the body most liable to become heated and to perspire. The eruption is preceded by chills, languor, slight fever, intense thirst, a sharp prickling sensation of the skin, and profuse perspiration. The vesicles soon desiccate and are replaced by a ...
— The People's Common Sense Medical Adviser in Plain English • R. V. Pierce

... because they often clean their bodies by bathing in wine, and soothe them with aromatic oil, and by the sweat of exercise they diffuse the poisonous vapor which corrupts the blood and the marrow. They do suffer a little from consumption, because they cannot perspire at the breast, but they never have asthma, for the humid nature of which a heavy man is required. They cure hot fevers with cold potations of water, but slight ones with sweet smells, with cheese-bread or sleep, with music or dancing. Tertiary fevers are cured by bleeding, by rhubarb ...
— The City of the Sun • Tommaso Campanells

... are warm; it is not so with springs, whose water has not been in contact with the air. You must wait till the temperature of the water is the same as that of the air. In winter, on the other hand, spring water is safer than river water. It is, however, unusual and unnatural to perspire greatly in winter, especially in the open air, for the cold air constantly strikes the skin and drives the perspiration inwards, and prevents the pores opening enough to give it passage. Now I do not intend ...
— Emile • Jean-Jacques Rousseau

... chair on the open roadway, and in a quarter of an hour you have a sheaf of wet pictures of yourself by which it certainly would be hard to recognize you. Inside the Greek Consulate rages a terrific hurly-burly. You wait and perspire in a vapour of garlic. . . . Then for the Bulgars. The Bulgars have certainly hit on a novelty. The rubber stamp is applied to your passport in one office and the date is written but the visa has to be signed in another office a mile away. Are we then through ...
— Europe—Whither Bound? - Being Letters of Travel from the Capitals of Europe in the Year 1921 • Stephen Graham

... prepare for Sabbath here, and how it is spent. About four o'clock on Friday mornings Mother and I get up and prepare the Sabbath loaves. I can tell you it is no easy matter, for, even when the weather is not frosty, the exertion of kneading the dough makes you perspire. If you finish kneading early enough, you get back to bed while the dough ...
— Pictures of Jewish Home-Life Fifty Years Ago • Hannah Trager

... the quinces in a dry day, when they are tolerably ripe; rub off the down with a linen cloth, and lay them in hay or straw for ten days to perspire. Cut them in quarters, take out the cores, and bruise them well in a mashing tub with a wooden pestle. Squeeze out the liquid part by degrees, by pressing them in a hair bag in a cider press. Strain the liquor through a fine sieve, ...
— The Cook and Housekeeper's Complete and Universal Dictionary; Including a System of Modern Cookery, in all Its Various Branches, • Mary Eaton

... up," said Jack finally, mopping his forehead, for in spite of the beautiful bracing air of the mountains, the act of running over the hill and into the valleys made him perspire. ...
— Dorothy Dale's Camping Days • Margaret Penrose

... fidelity. An unlucky member of the household mentioned a passage in the Morning Herald reflecting on the Queen; and forthwith Madame Schwellenberg began to storm in bad English, and told him that he made her "what you call perspire!" ...
— Critical and Historical Essays, Volume III (of 3) • Thomas Babington Macaulay

... began to perspire as he strode down the hill. He scarcely waited to hang the harness properly. He did not stop to unload the wagon until night, but went after an ax and a board that he split into pegs. Then he took a ball of twine, a ...
— The Harvester • Gene Stratton Porter

... protects the delicate structures which it covers, assists in the regulation of the temperature of the body, and excretes waste products. The excretory function of the skin is always active, but we are unconscious of this activity except on warm days and at times when we perspire freely. In the coldest weather, however, the body throws off what physiologists call the "insensible perspiration." The most important measures for the care of the skin are those intended to insure the activity of the sweat glands, namely, bathing and proper ...
— The Prospective Mother - A Handbook for Women During Pregnancy • J. Morris Slemons

... heavy legs. When he reached the place at last, he found it crowded with noisy customers about the "soda-fount"; and the clerks were stonily slow: they seemed to know that they were "already in eternity." He got very short of breath on the way home; he ceased to perspire and became unnaturally dry; the air was aflame and the sun shot fire upon his bare head. His feet inclined to strange disobediences: he walked the last block waveringly. A solemn Hedrick ...
— The Flirt • Booth Tarkington

... turn now to tremble and perspire. "Bless my soul, Jim!" said he, "no drift on the Comstock was ever half so hot as this, never, ...
— The Wedge of Gold • C. C. Goodwin

... first night. The next thing to be done is to take the Turkish bath (see end of book). It should be taken at night, after which drink a glass of hot lemonade and go to bed, covering the body thoroughly. No doubt you will perspire profusely, but that is what you need. In the morning take a good bath and rub down, following the directions given for bathing, drink a cup of hot water an hour before breakfast and let that meal be light, such ...
— The Royal Road to Health • Chas. A. Tyrrell



Words linked to "Perspire" :   sudate, excrete, egest, pass, eliminate, perspiration, sweat, swelter



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