Free TranslationFree Translation
Synonyms, antonyms, pronunciation

  Home
English Dictionary      examples: 'day', 'get rid of', 'New York Bay'




Place   /pleɪs/   Listen
Place

verb
(past & past part. placed; pres. part. placing)
1.
Put into a certain place or abstract location.  Synonyms: lay, pose, position, put, set.  "Set the tray down" , "Set the dogs on the scent of the missing children" , "Place emphasis on a certain point"
2.
Place somebody in a particular situation or location.
3.
Assign a rank or rating to.  Synonyms: grade, order, range, rank, rate.  "The restaurant is rated highly in the food guide"
4.
Assign a location to.  Synonyms: locate, site.
5.
To arrange for.  "Place a bet"
6.
Take a place in a competition; often followed by an ordinal.  Synonyms: come in, come out.
7.
Intend (something) to move towards a certain goal.  Synonyms: aim, direct, point, target.  "Criticism directed at her superior" , "Direct your anger towards others, not towards yourself"
8.
Recognize as being; establish the identity of someone or something.  Synonym: identify.
9.
Assign to (a job or a home).
10.
Locate.  Synonyms: localise, localize, set.
11.
Estimate.  Synonyms: put, set.
12.
Identify the location or place of.  Synonyms: localise, localize.
13.
Make an investment.  Synonyms: commit, invest, put.
14.
Assign to a station.  Synonyms: post, send, station.
15.
Finish second or better in a horse or dog race.
16.
Sing a note with the correct pitch.



Related searches:



WordNet 3.0 © 2010 Princeton University








Advanced search
     Find words:
Starting with
Ending with
Containing
Matching a pattern  

Synonyms
Antonyms
Quotes
Words linked to  

only single words



Share |





"Place" Quotes from Famous Books



... Early could collect these scattered forces and as the officers had been in the habit of amusing themselves during the winter by fox-hunting, I decided to use the hunt as an expedient for stealing a march on the enemy and had it given out that a grand fox-chase would take place on the 29th of February. Knowing that Lomas and Renfrew would spread the announcement south they were permitted to see several red foxes as well as a pack of hounds which had been secured for the spurt and were then started on a second expedition to burn the bridges. Of course, they ...
— Personal Recollections of a Cavalryman - With Custer's Michigan Cavalry Brigade in the Civil War • J. H. (James Harvey) Kidd

... the voyage to St. Louis. The goods with which it was loaded were very valuable. Slowly the men toiled up against the stream day after day. At length the little vessel came near to the mouth of Cottonwood Creek. A well-known robber band lurked at this place. With joy the boatmen saw a favorable wind spring up. They spread their sails, and the driving gale carried the barge in safety past the mouth of ...
— Stories of American Life and Adventure • Edward Eggleston

... answered quietly, "No, never mind! I only won the money from you in play, and gambling debts are not legally reclaimable. I ought never to have lent you the money in the first place." Then suddenly Trautvetter assumed a severely respectful manner, and added, "I should like to ask you something, sir; and that is that you would promise me ...
— 'Jena' or 'Sedan'? • Franz Beyerlein

... Patty informed them all that a musicale would take place. Everybody agreed to this, and all joined in singing gay choruses and glees. Patty sang solos, and Kit and Marie played duets. Then Patty sang to a violin obligato, and altogether the concert ...
— Patty's Suitors • Carolyn Wells

... to the place in the book wherein was painted Hallblithe's own image over against the image of the Hostage; and he looked thereon and longed. But she turned the leaf, and, lo! on one side the Hostage again, standing in a fair garden of the spring with the lilies all about her feet, and behind her ...
— The Story of the Glittering Plain - or the Land of Living Men • William Morris

... of the favorite and most exciting games of the Dakotas is ball-playing. A smooth place on the prairie, or in winter, on a frozen lake or river, is chosen. Each player has a sort of bat, called "T-ke-cha-ps-cha," about thirty two inches long with a hoop at the lower end four or five inches in diameter, interlaced with thongs of deer-skin, ...
— Legends of the Northwest • Hanford Lennox Gordon

... him I was now a Captain of Foot, and had a Promise of a Lieutenant Colonels Commission the next Vacancy, but that I design'd to throw up my Pretensions, and accompany King James. The Gentleman surpriz'd at what I said, I suppose Sir, said he, you must have a fair Prospect of a Place at Court to put it at Ballance with a Lieutenant Colonels Commission, and then turning his Discourse into Raillery, or perhaps says he, you are so taken with the beautiful Enclosures of Normandy, as to think a Tour in that Country will recompence all other Losses. No Sir, said I, but I ...
— Memoirs of Major Alexander Ramkins (1718) • Daniel Defoe

... with the "doctors." Dr. Keller met us in Memphis. Almost every one on the train was a physician, and Dr. Keller seemed to know them all. When we reached Cincinnati, we found the place full of doctors. There were several prominent Boston physicians among them. We stayed at the Burnet House. Everybody was delighted with Helen. All the learned men marveled at her intelligence and gaiety. There is something about her that attracts ...
— Story of My Life • Helen Keller

... eyes of one of the two bailiffs noticed with dismay that this impudent fellow dared to place himself close by the side of the tax-collector without taking off ...
— Andreas Hofer • Lousia Muhlbach

... a monument similar to the Kubr-er-Rumia, but older. It was built about 150 B.C. as the burial-place of the Numidian kings, and is situated 35 m. S.W. of Constantine. The form is that of a truncated cone, placed on a cylindrical base, 196 ft. in diameter. It is 60 ft. high. The columns encircling the cylindrical portion are stunted and much broader at the base ...
— Project Gutenberg Encyclopedia

... that he thought of his victories as due to his own strength and wisdom. So he is indignantly reminded that he is only 'a staff in Mine hand,' the axe with which God hewed the nations, whereas here the voice of God Himself speaks, and gives a strange place beside Himself to the will and power of this Conqueror. This feature of the prophecy should be accounted for in any ...
— Expositions of Holy Scripture - Isaiah and Jeremiah • Alexander Maclaren

... enough for us, Harry. It was 'Romeo and Juliet.' I must admit that I was rather annoyed at the idea of seeing Shakespeare done in such a wretched hole of a place. Still, I felt interested, in a sort of way. At any rate, I determined to wait for the first act. There was a dreadful orchestra, presided over by a young Hebrew who sat at a cracked piano, that nearly drove me away, but at last the drop-scene was drawn up, and the play began. Romeo ...
— The Picture of Dorian Gray • Oscar Wilde

... 105.) The portion west of the 330th meridian is evidently copied from Toscanelli's map. I give below (p. 429) a sketch (from Winsor, after Ruge's Geschichte des Zeitalters der Entdeckungen, p. 230) of Behaim's ocean, with the outline of the American continent superimposed in the proper place.] ...
— The Discovery of America Vol. 1 (of 2) - with some account of Ancient America and the Spanish Conquest • John Fiske

... and a dirty native on the top of all, we left the docks. Cabby did not know the Arsenal and we took this native because, after infinite jabbering, he declared he knew it. But instead of taking us about a mile along the quay he landed us in Place Mahomet Ali, miles off. He was a beast this guide, ready to swear he knew everything, a filthy, thick-lipped pimp who offered his good services again when night came. "Sir will have a fine evening to-day," he began, then detailed all the ...
— The Incomparable 29th and the "River Clyde" • George Davidson

... numbers of the Magazine for the latter half of each year that the publication took place. The parliamentary recess was the busy time for reporters and printers. It was commonly believed that the resolution on the Journals of the House of Commons against publishing any of its proceedings was only in force while parliament was sitting. But on April 13, ...
— Life Of Johnson, Vol. 1 • Boswell, Edited by Birkbeck Hill

... than water that they will not mix with further quantities unless they are thoroughly agitated therewith. Either may be poured through water, or have water floated upon it, without any appreciable admixture taking place; and therefore in first adding them to the seal great care must be taken that they are uniformly distributed throughout the liquid. If the whole contents of the seal cannot conveniently be run into ...
— Acetylene, The Principles Of Its Generation And Use • F. H. Leeds and W. J. Atkinson Butterfield

... like a God; but he had sought, By destiny dismiss'd long since, the shades. On those stones therefore now, Nestor himself, Achaia's guardian, sat, sceptre in hand, Where soon his num'rous sons, leaving betimes 520 The place of their repose, also appeared, Echephron, Stratius, Perseus, Thrasymedes, Aretus and Pisistratus. They placed Godlike Telemachus at Nestor's side, And the Gerenian Hero thus began. Sons be ye quick—execute with dispatch My purpose, that I may propitiate first Of all the Gods Minerva, who ...
— The Odyssey of Homer • Homer

... Oliver's was a homelike place: The black tarred paper that covered its walls was fairly hidden from sight by selected illustrations cut out of leading weeklies—these illustrations being arranged with a nice eye to convenience, right side up, the small-sized pictures low down, the larger ones higher. There was a fireplace ...
— The Plow-Woman • Eleanor Gates

... for the purpose of erecting a light-house; the building has been raised, and stands there, a monument of useless expenditure. There are a number of "groggeries," stores, and other habitations, at the base of the bluffs, for the accommodation of flat-boatmen, which form a distinct town, and the place is called, in contradistinction to the city above, Natchez-under-the-hill. Swarms of unfortunate females, of every shade of colour, may be seen here sporting with the river navigators, and this little spot ...
— A Ramble of Six Thousand Miles through the United States of America • S. A. Ferrall

... driving a string of loaded bullocks to Chittrah from Palamow. When they were come within a few miles of the former place, a tiger seized on the man in the rear, which was seen by a Guallah [herdsman], as he was watching his buffaloes grazing. He boldly ran to the man's assistance, and cut the tiger severely with his sword; upon which he dropped the Biparie and seized the ...
— The Book of Enterprise and Adventure - Being an Excitement to Reading. For Young People. A New and Condensed Edition. • Anonymous

... already knows, the conversion of Apaecides, the plan they had proposed for the detection of the impostures of the Egyptian upon the youthful weakness of the proselyte. 'Therefore,' concluded Olinthus, 'had the deceased encountered Arbaces, reviled his treasons, and threatened detection, the place, the hour, might have favored the wrath of the Egyptian, and passion and craft alike ...
— The Last Days of Pompeii • Edward George Bulwer-Lytton

... the place on Pell Street that we think is Wu Fang's," they reported excitedly. "It's in number fourteen, as you thought. We've left an operative disguised as a blind beggar ...
— The Romance of Elaine • Arthur B. Reeve

... the irony and glanced perplexed about him. There was, obviously, no place near that was not open to the objection urged. Everywhere the snow lay deep on grass and pathway; the trees were sheeted ghosts, the chill struck through ...
— Doom Castle • Neil Munro

... is, sir, Jane and I talk of commemorating the annual recurrence of the anniversary of our wedding-day, at some place a leetle farther in the country; but our minds are in a perfect vacuum concerning the identity of the spot. Now, sir, will you reduce the place to a mathematical certainty, and be ...
— Stories of Comedy • Various

... trust to Bunny getting him safely off, whether I will or not," he muttered. "Oh, but he's sure to get him aboard, and I had not reckoned on this. Father is up at the porch door by now, to find the soldiers searching the place, and the first thing he will say will ...
— The New Forest Spy • George Manville Fenn

... The drawers, and the rovers, the spreaders and the spinners still, like bower-birds, adorned the scenes of their toil. A valentine or two and the portrait of a gamekeeper and his dog hung beside the carding machine; for Sally Groves had retired and a younger woman was in her place. She, too, fed the Card by hand, but not so perfectly as Sally was ...
— The Spinners • Eden Phillpotts

... not to notice the word "bring" in place of "send": "Ah, good, Flora! ah, fine! You'll see! The dear boy's coming that far with the battery only on his ...
— Kincaid's Battery • George W. Cable

... farewell which reached him just as he was leaving the Old World, little thinking then that he was to make a permanent home in America, were these lines from Humboldt, written at Sans Souci: "Be happy in this new undertaking, and preserve for me the first place under the head of friendship in your heart. When you return I shall be here no more, but the king and queen will receive you on this 'historic hill' with the affection which, for so many reasons, ...
— Louis Agassiz: His Life and Correspondence • Louis Agassiz

... The place is full of rumours of all sorts of horrors,—that the Germans have landed in Scotland, that they are driving the Allies back on all sides, and that the casualties are in thousands. So far there are 200 sick, minor cases, at No.—, ...
— Diary of a Nursing Sister on the Western Front, 1914-1915 • Anonymous

... audience was no longer concerned with the activities of political power, exercised a further influence upon the writers of the age. The old interests of aristocracy—the romance of action, the exalted passions of chivalry and war—faded into the background, and their place was taken by the refined and intimate pursuits of peace and civilization. The exquisite letters of Madame de Sevigne show us society assuming its modern complexion, women becoming the arbiters of taste and ...
— Landmarks in French Literature • G. Lytton Strachey

... had just finished when Stephen made his way a short distance up the rigging. "I can see the line of surf, captain; it is not more than three miles away. You had better take a look at it—you may be able to tell where we are. I think I can make out a place of some ...
— With Cochrane the Dauntless • George Alfred Henty

... believe in them, and by whom they may be sustained. If you shut them in prison, or send them into exile, they corrupt those near to them with their words, and those at a distance with their books. Therefore, the only remedy is to send them betimes into their own place." ...
— Through Five Republics on Horseback • G. Whitfield Ray

... Images of the gods are now over-recognized by the priest, for they must be revered like the gods themselves (ib. 12; P[a]r. Grih. S. 3. 14. 8. etc.). Among the developed objects of the cult serpents now occupy a prominent place. They are mentioned as worshipful in the Br[a]hmanas. In the S[u]tra period offerings are made to snakes of earth, air, and heaven; the serpents are 'satiated' along with gods, plants, demons, etc. (C[a][.n]kh. 4. 9. ...
— The Religions of India - Handbooks On The History Of Religions, Volume 1, Edited By Morris Jastrow • Edward Washburn Hopkins

... branch of the Church of Christ. He had not a drop of malice in his blood. He never learned the art of bearing a grudge, and when he was reviled, he never reviled again. He was free with his money, and could never refuse a beggar. He was a thoughtful and suggestive theological writer, and holds a high place in the history of dogma; and no thinker expounded more beautifully than he the grand doctrine that the innermost nature of God is revealed in all its glory to man in the Person of the suffering Man Christ Jesus. He was a beautiful Christian poet; his hymns are found to-day in every collection; ...
— History of the Moravian Church • J. E. Hutton

... had taken place in the old white-pillared house since Ferdy had been an inmate. New furniture of black walnut supplanted, at least on the first floor, the old horsehair sofa and split-bottomed chairs and pine tables; a new plush sofa and a new piano glistened ...
— Gordon Keith • Thomas Nelson Page

... was in the house of Mr Carfrae, Baxter's Close, Lawnmarket, "first scale stair on the left hand in going down, first door in the stair." During Burns's life it was reserved for William Pitt to recognize his place as a great poet; the more cautious critics of the North were satisfied to endorse him as a rustic prodigy, and brought upon themselves a share of his satire. Some of the friendships contracted during this period—as for Lord Glencairn and Mrs Dunlop—are among the most pleasing ...
— Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 4, Part 4 - "Bulgaria" to "Calgary" • Various

... rest of the family, taking his children with her, if Mr. Dinsmore and Elsie should still feel willing to take them in charge. He had a high opinion of Dr. Conly's skill as a physician, and was extremely anxious to place Gracie under his care. Also he thought that to no other persons in the world would he so joyfully commit his children to be trained up and educated as to Mr. Dinsmore, his daughter and granddaughter, and he was more than willing to delegate ...
— Grandmother Elsie • Martha Finley

... ended in that ill-starred miscreant's death. Nor did I learn, until months had elapsed, that my good friend John Turner had also hastened to Nice, taking thither with him a great Parisian lawyer to defend me in the trial that took place while I lay ill at Genoa. Sister Renee, moreover, had not laid aside her womanly guile when she took the veil, for she concealed from me with perfect success that I was under guard night and day in my bedroom ...
— Dross • Henry Seton Merriman

... however, I saw that they were quadrupeds; but so nimbly did they go, leaping from ledge to ledge, that it was impossible to see their limbs. They appeared to be animals of the deer species—somewhat larger than sheep or goats—but we could see that, in place of antlers, each of them had a pair of huge curving horns. As they leaped downward, from one platform of the cliffs to another, we fancied that they whirled about in the air, as though they were 'turning somersaults,' and seemed at times to come ...
— The Desert Home - The Adventures of a Lost Family in the Wilderness • Mayne Reid

... library, and he devoted himself to study. He put in his books, as he read them, slips of paper to indicate passages and chapters that he would have to consult, and as he finished with a book, he put it in a certain place on a certain shelf. He made no other notes or references—he was a man with a colossal memory, and he knew exactly what his markers meant. In the middle of this life of acquisition, while he bored like a worm ...
— The Altar Fire • Arthur Christopher Benson

... finally monopolized the adventurer's attention; had he been in Germany, he would have looked for gray castle-towers rising behind the foliage. The place looked inaccessible and romantic, and was undeniably picturesque. New York was far enough away to be mistaken for—say—Alexandria; while the broad river certainly took its rise in as prehistoric an ...
— Idolatry - A Romance • Julian Hawthorne

... east, racial feeling was known to be greatly inflamed, and it was reported that, if a few recruiters crossed the Orange river from the districts occupied by the enemy to the north of the river, a rising would probably take place. Even nearer to Cape Town, in the fertile and wine-producing districts of Stellenbosch, Paarl, Ceres, Tulbagh, and Worcester, all most difficult to deal with, owing to the broken character of the ground and its intersection by rough mountain ranges, a portion of the inhabitants had shown signs ...
— History of the War in South Africa 1899-1902 v. 1 (of 4) - Compiled by Direction of His Majesty's Government • Frederick Maurice

... sweet!" gushed Mrs. Bowser. "Is it that dear China New Year that I've heard tell on, and do they take you in to dinner at every place you call, and do they really eat rats? Ugh, the horrid things!" And Mrs. Bowser pulled up short ...
— Blindfolded • Earle Ashley Walcott

... made her so silent, she was burning with mortification because the coat he wore was the very same she had criticised last spring, hoping in her heart of hearts that long before he came to her again it might find its proper place, either in the sewing society or with some Jewish vender of old clothes. Yet here it was again, and her head was resting against it, while her heart beat almost audibly, and her voice was even petulant in its tone as she answered her lover's ...
— Ethelyn's Mistake • Mary Jane Holmes

... and amusements. Now we have volunteer reviews in place of old yeomanry weeks. But it is worth while looking back on what was so hearty, quaint, humorous, and stirring in ...
— Girlhood and Womanhood - The Story of some Fortunes and Misfortunes • Sarah Tytler

... slipped from the clinging hands, and glared angrily. "You ain't ever properly learned your place. You better let go any fool idee that you can budge me with your wiles. I don't have to buy your favours—they're mine. What I do, I do, and you take what I choose to let you have. See? If you get more than what is rightfully yours, don't get sot up with the notion I don't know what ...
— Joyce of the North Woods • Harriet T. Comstock

... ought not to detract from the merit and good intention of our great ally, have nevertheless lessened the importance of its services in a great degree. The length of the passage, in the first instance, was a capital misfortune; for had even one of common length taken place, Lord Howe, with the British ships-of-war and all the transports in the river Delaware, must inevitably have fallen; and Sir Henry Clinton must have had better luck than is commonly dispensed to men of his profession under such circumstances, if he and his troops had not ...
— The Influence of Sea Power Upon History, 1660-1783 • A. T. Mahan

... followed the unsuccessful attempt to capture Petersburg before it could be reinforced, unsuccessful by reason of the want of persistence on the part of the general intrusted with the duty. This failure involved a long siege of that place, which the Confederates made impregnable to assault. A breach in the defences was made by the explosion of a mine constructed with vast labor, but there was failure to follow up the advantage with sufficient promptness. Here the Army of the Potomac passed the winter, except the ...
— Ulysses S. Grant • Walter Allen

... time to act as the sole teacher in these gatherings, that the word of God might have free course and be glorified. Afterward, when there seemed to be among the brethren some proper apprehension of vital spiritual truths, with his usual consistency and humility he resumed his place as simply a brother among fellow believers, all of whom had liberty to teach as the Spirit might lead and guide. There was, however, no shrinking from any duty or responsibility laid upon him by larger, ...
— George Muller of Bristol - His Witness to a Prayer-Hearing God • Arthur T. Pierson

... to the point, will you go out with me and give me the benefit of your expert advice as to the best place in this neighborhood to buy the aforementioned ...
— The Radio Boys at the Sending Station - Making Good in the Wireless Room • Allen Chapman

... she said, very seriously. "In every human heart, Cary, there is a place where the man or the woman dwells inside all the frippery and mannerism; the real creature itself, stripped of all disguises. Dig down to that place if you want to ...
— Out in the Forty-Five - Duncan Keith's Vow • Emily Sarah Holt

... universe. Thus it is always in himself, that is, in his own individual mode of feeling, that he draws up the ideas of the order, the wisdom, the excellence, the perfection which he ascribes to the Deity; whilst the good as well as the evil which take place in the world, are the necessary consequence of the essence of things; of the general, immutable laws of nature; in short, of the gravitation, of the repulsion of matter; of those unchangeable laws of motion, ...
— The System of Nature, Vol. 2 • Baron D'Holbach

... in an enviable state of disenthraldom from thoughtfulness, I graciously accorded him a sympathetic smile. And then this more than Gregorian cure for the head-ache! here was an anodyne infinitely precious to one so brain-feverish as I: had all this pleasure and comfort arisen from such common-place remedials as a dear young lover's courtesy or a deceased old miser's codicil, I should long ago have heard all about it; for, between ourselves, my friend was never known to keep a secret. There was evidently more than this in the discovery; and when ...
— The Complete Prose Works of Martin Farquhar Tupper • Martin Farquhar Tupper

... soul.[136] The hair on thy body stands erect. Thy mind and understanding are both still. Thou art as immobile now, O Madhava, as a wooden post or a stone. O illustrious God, thou art as still as the flame of a lamp burning in a place where there is no wind. Thou art as immobile as a mass of rock. If I am fit to hear the cause, if it is no secret of thine, dispel, O god, my doubt for I beg of thee and solicit it as a favour. Thou ...
— The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 3 - Books 8, 9, 10, 11 and 12 • Unknown

... square, O slattern place, Is glory in your slack disgrace? Plump quack doctors sell their pills, Gentle grafters sell brass watches, Silly anarchists yell their ills. Shall we be as weird as these? In ...
— Chinese Nightingale • Vachel Lindsay

... king beckoned Enda to him, and was about to place his hand in Mave's when a Druid, whose white beard almost touched the ground, and who had been a favourite of the dead stepmother, and hated Mave for her sake, stepped ...
— Irish Fairy Tales • Edmund Leamy

... speak so loud!' cried the little artist. 'It would cost me my place if I were heard to speak lightly of the young ladies; and besides, why oysters from Italy? and why should they come to me addressed in ...
— The Wrong Box • Robert Louis Stevenson and Lloyd Osbourne

... the first place, we're all agreed that though Peter believes that, it is a mistake on his part; that is, it may be a mistake. Don't let it influence you too much, ...
— The Come Back • Carolyn Wells

... BREVE}lhili, was created by Naye{COMBINING BREVE}nayezgani to be his helper in the task of making the earth a good dwelling-place for the people. Haschi{COMBINING BREVE}n made the animals, mountains, trees, and rivers, gave the people weapons and implements, and showed how they were to be used. When all were supplied with houses to live in and weapons with which to protect themselves ...
— The North American Indian • Edward S. Curtis

... dare!" said Will Jaquith. "Dear old friend, I will tell you what it means. It means that I have brought you another Golden Lily in place of the one you said I spoiled. You can only have her to look at, though, for she is mine, mine and my mother's, and we cannot give ...
— Mrs. Tree • Laura E. Richards

... handful of men, between the Syracusan cavalry and the fugitives. This gallant action turned the tide of battle once more, and gave the Athenians on the right wing time to rally; but Lamachus and his followers, pushing forward too hotly, were attacked by the enemy in a place where their retreat was cut off by a ditch, and slain to ...
— Stories From Thucydides • H. L. Havell

... national guard of the interior might have been alarmed, and we should have been placed under express and open surveillance. The confusion created by the constant change of guard, however, stood us in good stead in this emergency. Much passing and repassing took place unheeded in the bustle. ...
— The Memoirs of Louis XV. and XVI., Volume 7 • Madame du Hausset, and of an Unknown English Girl and the Princess Lamballe

... remarks on this well-known work. As a practical and devotional commentary it did not perhaps attain to the permanent popularity of Matthew Henry's commentary, and in point of erudition and acuteness it is not equal to that of Adam Clarke. But it holds an important place of its own in the Evangelical literature of its class, and its usefulness extended beyond the limits of the Evangelical school. Its immediate success was enormous, perhaps almost unparalleled in literary ...
— The English Church in the Eighteenth Century • Charles J. Abbey and John H. Overton

... of Queen Margaret. The immortal Shakspeare, whose consummate art makes us read history in drama, and drama in history,[367] has commemorated this event, though not with his usual ability. The object of sending him to Ireland was to deprive the Yorkists of his powerful support and influence, and place the affairs of France, which he had managed with considerable ability, in other hands. In fact, the appointment was intended as an honorable exile. The Irish, with that natural veneration for lawful authority ...
— An Illustrated History of Ireland from AD 400 to 1800 • Mary Frances Cusack

... I ask. Fool. I am very thirsty.... It was very hot in the cabin, and it seemed to turn slowly round, detach itself from the ship, and swing out smoothly into a luminous, arid space where a black sun shone, spinning very fast. A place without any water! No water! A policeman with the face of Donkin drank a glass of beer by the side of an empty well, and flew away flapping vigorously. A ship whose mastheads protruded through the sky and could not be seen, was discharging grain, and the wind whirled the ...
— The Nigger Of The "Narcissus" - A Tale Of The Forecastle • Joseph Conrad

... Heavy sea running, the Sisters west-south-west about 4 miles, at 6 hauled up for a sandy beach bearing S.S. Found this place a good shelter from the wind and good riding, found the tide setting about cast and west, at 4 made sail, Rocky Island south-east 1/2 east 4 miles standing alongshore, Gull Island south-south-east 5 miles.* (* Islands ...
— The Logbooks of the Lady Nelson - With The Journal Of Her First Commander Lieutenant James Grant, R.N • Ida Lee

... much more beautiful than that we are now in, Chanito; in the first place, it has mountains and woods, ...
— Adventures of a Young Naturalist • Lucien Biart

... In the market-place of Sicuani, the largest town in the valley, and the border-line between the potato-growing uplands and lowland maize fields, we attended the famous Sunday market. Many native "druggists" were present. Their stock usually consisted of "medicines," whose efficacy was learned ...
— Inca Land - Explorations in the Highlands of Peru • Hiram Bingham

... am obliged," breaks in Mr. Ellins, "to take with me, for purely business reasons, my private secretary. Mrs. Hemmingway, isn't the young man somewhere about the place?" ...
— Wilt Thou Torchy • Sewell Ford

... artificial, so devoid of real interest, this life that eats up hours and weeks and months in futilities, in nothings that come to nothing, all this became suddenly quite burdensome to me. I continuously thought of the adorable child I had seen at Penhouet, brighter than all else in that radiant place. I was travelling, and did not learn of the accident to your cousin and Count Styvens until I returned to Paris. ...
— The Idol of Paris • Sarah Bernhardt

... the booths were made up of old sails and all sorts of strange draperies. Here and there light shone through the openings, and at one place Madame distinguished ...
— Tales of Two Countries • Alexander Kielland

... paper, came nearest to the philosophy of the subject was Angstroem. In that paper, translated by myself, and published in the "Philosophical Magazine" for 1855, he indicates that the rays which a body absorbs are precisely those which, when luminous, it can emit. In another place, he speaks of one of his spectra giving the general impression of the reversal of the solar spectrum. But his memoir, philosophical as it is, is distinctly marked by the uncertainty of his time. Foucault, Thomson, and Balfour Stewart have all been near the discovery, while, as already ...
— Six Lectures on Light - Delivered In The United States In 1872-1873 • John Tyndall

... little island bore within its bosom wealth sufficient to buy an earldom. The silence of the dreary solitude sealed the secret; and there was no man who might discover it, other than those who laid the chests in their earthly hiding place. The moon gave testimony to the hidden treasure, and bore its silent witness through ...
— Money Island • Andrew Jackson Howell, Jr.

... Eastern Church for the salvation of the Western Church and its worst members. The first interview between Rechberg and Gortschakoff, if we can believe a despatch from Warsaw, led quickly to a quarrel, which must have taken place not long after their chiefs, the Kaiser and the Czar, had been locked in each other's arms at the railway-station. It is but just to the Austrians to state, that they probably had received from St. Petersburg some promises of assistance, ...
— Atlantic Monthly Volume 7, No. 39, January, 1861 • Various

... need know, and you scarcely, before this fresco, need know so much, is, that here are an old husband and old wife, meeting again by surprise, after losing each other, and being each in great fear;—meeting at the place where they were told by God each to go, without knowing ...
— Mornings in Florence • John Ruskin

... his release button and the tractor fell with a jarring crash to the floor of the catch basin. On the floor, its mass held it in place against the drag of the three huge pumps and the natural flow of ...
— The Thirst Quenchers • Rick Raphael

... see." It gave him such a fine opportunity to dictate to Volmer! If the striker did not bring the eggs the very moment he thought they should be in, Hang would look him up and say, "You bling leggs!" Just where these boxes of eggs are I do not know. The Chinaman has spirited them off to some place where they will not freeze. He cannot understand all this ranking out of quarters, particularly after he had put the house in perfect order. When I told him to sweep the rooms after everything had been carried out, he said: "What for? You cleanee house nuff for him; he no ...
— Army Letters from an Officer's Wife, 1871-1888 • Frances M.A. Roe

... the Queen was staying in a watering-place, some distance from home, she was sitting by a fountain alone, sadly thinking of the daughter she longed to have, when she perceived a crab coming in her direction, who, to the Queen's surprise, addressed ...
— My Book of Favorite Fairy Tales • Edric Vredenburg

... lamp with an Italian shade, and a large vase of resplendently-blooming flowers. Flowers, indeed, of gorgeous colours and delicate odour formed the sole mere decoration of the apartment. The fire-place was nearly filled with a vase of brilliant geranium. On a triangular shelf in each angle of the room stood also a similar vase, varied only as to its lovely contents. One or two smaller bouquets adorned the mantel, and late violets clustered about ...
— The Works of Edgar Allan Poe - Volume 2 (of 5) of the Raven Edition • Edgar Allan Poe

... in Liberia by the American commission, undertaken through the Department of State, have been concluded and it is only necessary for certain formalities to be arranged in securing the loan which it is hoped will place that republic on a practical ...
— State of the Union Addresses of William H. Taft • William H. Taft

... these are my troops; the colored pins designate the armies of my enemies. They are allied; but I—I have no longer a single ally at this hour; I stand alone, and have to meet eight different armies. See here, Maret: there is, in the first place, the grand army of the Russians, Austrians, Bavarians, and Wurtembergers, commanded by Prince Schwartzenberg, and accompanied by the allied monarchs; next, there is the grand Prussian army, with the Russian and Saxon corps, under the ...
— NAPOLEON AND BLUCHER • L. Muhlbach

... called a search warrant, I believe. I came up to the house immediately, but I could not induce any of the servants to bring word in to you. Mr. Jesson, the Duke's own man, told me that it was as much as his place was worth to allow any one ...
— The Betrayal • E. Phillips Oppenheim

... a favourite filling of this kind. Embroidery stitches can be made use of for couching down other threads; a bunch of threads may be laid upon the material, and an open chain, buttonhole, or feather stitch worked over in order to fix it in place. ...
— Embroidery and Tapestry Weaving • Grace Christie

... have a lover would of itself make a stir in this little place;—but that she should have a lord for her lover! One doesn't want to be looked at ...
— Marion Fay • Anthony Trollope

... constrained to winter in this island, not only because the season was far spent, but also because the sick passengers could no longer support the incommodities of the sea. The place notwithstanding was not very proper for infirm persons, for the air is unwholesome; which proceeds from hence, that the sea overflowing the low-lands of the isle, at the spring tides, the mass of waters there gathered and inclosed is corrupted ...
— The Works of John Dryden, Volume XVI. (of 18) - The Life of St. Francis Xavier • John Dryden

... wildest notion I ever heard of," Ingram protested again. "How can I take charge of her? If Sheila herself had shown any disposition to place herself under your care, it might have ...
— Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science, Vol. 12, No. 32, November, 1873 • Various

... under the protection of a Red Cross flag. Commandant Schalk-Burger is said to have replied somewhat insolently that he understands the Geneva flag is being used by us to shelter combatants. At any rate Intombi is the place for our sick and wounded, and he will not respect any other hospital flag. Curiously enough we accept this humiliation, so far as to remove the patients and provide for them a camping-ground where the tents cannot be seen; but the Red Cross flag still flies on the Town Hall. Again we ...
— Four Months Besieged - The Story of Ladysmith • H. H. S. Pearse

... at this moment he worketh his will on thee." Said her husband, "Beside me there is neither man nor boy." And said she, "Here I am[FN171] looking at thee from the top of this tree." Quoth he, "O woman, this place must be haunted,[FN172] so let us remove hence;" and quoth she, "Why change our place? rather let us remain therein." Hereupon the Caliph said to Manjab, "By Allah, verily, this woman was an adulteress;" and the youth replied, ...
— Supplemental Nights, Volume 5 • Richard F. Burton

... to be done was to remove him to a place of safety, for the troops dispatched the wounded Communists wherever they found them. They were alone, fortunately; there was not a minute to lose. He first ripped the sleeve from wrist to shoulder with his knife, then took off the uniform coat. Some ...
— The Downfall • Emile Zola

... him: why shouldn't he go and see his friend? He went. The Miller received him cordially, and at once brought out liquor; and the two began drinking, and chattering about their ways and doings. All this took place towards nightfall, and the Soldier stopped so long at the Miller's ...
— Russian Fairy Tales - A Choice Collection of Muscovite Folk-lore • W. R. S. Ralston

... Heaven could find a place, Or shame the worshiper bow down, Who meets the Savior face to face, 'Twould be to wear ...
— And Judas Iscariot - Together with other evangelistic addresses • J. Wilbur Chapman

... a smaller place than Sully and Villeroi in the government of Henry IV.; but he held and deserves to keep a great one in the history of his times. He was the most eminent and also the most moderate of the men of profound piety and conviction of whom ...
— A Popular History of France From The Earliest Times - Volume V. of VI. • Francois Pierre Guillaume Guizot

... White and his Staff. The attack on the enemy's gun positions coincided with General Sir Redvers Buller's preparations to force the passage of the Tugela at Colenso, and to march to the relief of Ladysmith. This, however, was not generally known in the town, which was engaged by what was taking place nearer at hand. On 12th December Mr. ...
— Four Months Besieged - The Story of Ladysmith • H. H. S. Pearse

... made them away; but his own he has made, emphatically made it; he is worth a million pounds. Hurrah for the millionnaire! The clown who views the pandemonium of red brick which he has built on the estate which he has purchased in the neighbourhood of the place of his grand debut, in which every species of architecture, Greek, Indian, and Chinese, is employed in caricature—who hears of the grand entertainment he gives at Christmas in the principal dining-room, the hundred wax-candles, the waggon-load of plate, and the ocean of wine which ...
— The Romany Rye • George Borrow

... crystal-clear that I need but allude to it. I will only remark on the law of the case, that committing an obstruction is a peculiar offence, since it is committed by everyone who, being in a public thoroughfare, does not walk briskly through the streets from his starting-place to his goal. There is no need to show that some other person is hindered by him in his loitering, since obviously that might be the case; and besides, his loitering might hinder another from forming in his mind a legitimate wish to be there, and ...
— The Tables Turned - or, Nupkins Awakened. A Socialist Interlude • William Morris

... which he had not made. It was what a servant might have said—an inferior open to suspicion—or, at any rate, a stranger. He was angry at being so wretchedly misunderstood; disenchanted at her not being instinctively aware of the place he had secretly given her in ...
— Victory • Joseph Conrad

... bowels of the earth by volcanic heat, the denser ingredients of the boiling fluid may sink to the bottom, and the lighter remaining above would in that case be first propelled upward to the surface by the expansive power of gases. Those materials, therefore, which occupy the lowest place in the subterranean reservoir will always be emitted last, and take the uppermost place on the exterior ...
— The Student's Elements of Geology • Sir Charles Lyell

... ladder until they came to the bottom. The water was roaring on both sides of them, but they had a place to stand. Here they rested a little while. The water in front of them was not rapid. They jumped into it, intending to swim ashore. But the water that pours in from the falls on each side, runs back against the rocks in this place. Every time the Indians tried to swim, they were thrown ...
— Stories of American Life and Adventure • Edward Eggleston

... "Wady al-Naml"; a reminiscence of the Koranic Wady (chaps. xxvii.), which some place in Syria and others ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 5 • Richard F. Burton

... proposed a game at faro, and Bettoni, knowing Medini to be a professional gamester, asked him to hold the bank. He begged to be excused, saying he had not enough money, so I consented to take his place. ...
— The Memoires of Casanova, Complete • Jacques Casanova de Seingalt

... (3 Langham Place, London, W.), is a magazine of which any society might be proud. It is weighty, striking, suggestive, and up-to-date. The articles are all by recognised experts, and they all deal with some aspect of a really profound subject. It is a very remarkable ...
— Avataras • Annie Besant

... explorations of the far West were taking place, the old West was steadily filling with population and becoming more and more a coherent portion of the Union. In the treaties made from time to time with the Northwestern Indians, they ceded so much land that at last the entire northern bank of ...
— The Winning of the West, Volume Four - Louisiana and the Northwest, 1791-1807 • Theodore Roosevelt

... a portly man, with a place in the country, and a house in town; not rich for his position, but well off; a magistrate, and much respected; well educated in the ideas of the ancients, with whom his own ideas on many subjects stopped short, and hardly to be called intellectual; a moderate Churchman, ...
— The Heavenly Twins • Madame Sarah Grand

... though favourable, to four men not far from the place, and gradually, but with slow steps, drawing nearer to it. For they are approaching by stealth, as can be told by their attitudes and gestures. They advance crouchingly, now and then stopping to take a survey of the terrain in front, as they do so ...
— The Flag of Distress - A Story of the South Sea • Mayne Reid

... habit of keeping girls in solitary confinement from a tender age until the consummation of marriage;[214] and the African custom of infibulation,[215] are classes of facts indicating that the sexual element occupied a large place in the ...
— Sex and Society • William I. Thomas

... I am answering your questions correctly. Sir Thomas More professed to describe Utopia, which means No-place, and mentions a river Waterless. Don't look so desperately lofty. I will show you the book, if you are so incorrigibly stupid." He passed his arm round her as he spoke, and kept ...
— Beulah • Augusta J. Evans

... place, anciently called Maigoga, on the 21st of June, as I have said before, and were obliged to continue there till November, because the winter begins here in May, and its greatest rigour is from the middle of June to the middle of September. The rains that are almost continually falling in this season ...
— A Voyage to Abyssinia • Jerome Lobo

... death 145 Ulysses meets Alcides' WRAITH; Aeneas, upon Thracia's shore, The ghost of murder'd Polydore; For omens, we in Livy cross, At every turn, locutus Bos. 150 As grave and duly speaks that ox, As if he told the price of stocks; Or held, in Rome republican, The place of Common-councilman. ...
— Marmion • Sir Walter Scott



Words linked to "Place" :   pastorship, hot seat, front, cognition, emplace, gauge, headship, protectorship, differentiate, emirate, right, messiahship, juxtaposition, sign, summit, set down, hatchery, half-staff, evaluate, status, dramatic art, magistracy, inclose, address, feudal lordship, take, lay over, represent, jar, area, plaza, moderatorship, showplace, recline, plant, fund, tee up, precentorship, speculate, depute, locality, associateship, determine, presidency, custodianship, clap, lectureship, public office, abode, home in, rulership, curacy, tip, chairmanship, separate, social rank, judgeship, niche, delegate, puddle, take aim, internship, lieutenancy, stand up, pigeonhole, pile, step, prioritise, upend, vicinity, lead, instructorship, form, sit down, throw, parallelize, dramatics, colony, situate, vice-presidency, target area, captainship, home away from home, cram, expanse, ambassadorship, heights, stratum, clerkship, localize, councilorship, place of birth, to a lower place, managership, rendezvous, airplane, replace, superpose, prelature, sow, treasurership, repose, eldership, half-mast, shelter, knowledge, directorship, docket, vantage, proconsulship, peasanthood, social status, pastorate, rectorate, market place, underlay, enclose, glycerolize, race, dispose, residency, neck of the woods, tribuneship, range in, train, presidentship, instal, studentship, counsellorship, shelve, cardinalship, bailiffship, direct, send, judge, deanship, estimate, center, buy into, viziership, intersperse, indent, place-kicking, centre, divest, wardenship, fix, prepose, academicianship, governorship, chancellorship, tee, pool, chaplainship, geographical region, professorship, install, postposition, deposit, preposition, caliphate, place of origin, mecca, fort, teachership, coffin, secern, noesis, pillow, sit, reposition, commandership, plum, perch, baronetage, polls, chieftaincy, load, to a higher place, prelacy, put back, anomaly, appose, present, sequence, neighborhood, curatorship, seigneury, tell apart, nestle, judicature, pole position, square, siphon, indenture, grave, counselorship, thaneship, poise, back, episcopate, margin, legation, jumping-off place, inspectorship, tie up, attorneyship, stratify, reorder, fatherhood, function, dramaturgy, designate, senatorship, occupation, holy, shortlist, overlook, chieftainship, geographical area, legislatorship, imaginary place, line of work, assign, hole-in-the-wall, middle, set up, principalship, lose, subordinate, layer, womanhood, secernate, prioritize, peak, comptrollership, cadetship, rabbinate, commandery, introduce, social station, bucket, stage, captaincy, generalcy, butt, ship, solitude, drop, polling place, plane, regency, crown, viceroyship, marshalship, trench, fictitious place, controllership, postpose, pass judgment, garrison, snuggle, surface area, foremanship, position, point, rear, station, condition, insert, place kick, superimpose, overlordship, agent-in-place, pitch, post, seigniory, deanery, manhood, zero in, recess, expend, passage, prefecture, stewardship, service area, part, imbricate, tell, proctorship, editorship, upgrade, wardership, polling station, line, solicitorship, guess, top, glycerolise, rectorship, boatyard, proconsulate, mislay, job, run, ladle, generalship, ground, sanctuary, in a higher place, behalf, bottle, theater, thrust, sanctum, junction, apostleship, stop, secretaryship, place of worship, mastership, barrel, accountantship, councillorship, approximate, roll over, theatre, rest, holy place, posit, setting, business, indention, discipleship, sainthood, premiership, second-place finish, park, speakership, sinecure, cock, lie, geographic region, left, chaplaincy, khanate, admiralty, receivership, move, role, ensconce, librarianship, high, distinguish, magistrature, rack up, downgrade, tomb, crest, mayoralty, settle, juxtapose, wing, home from home, apprenticeship, seed, geographic area, neighbourhood, marshal, consulship, shoes, residence, level, public square, item, indentation, severalize, eating place, bishopry, preceptorship, zone, superordinate, spend, trusteeship, landmark, arrange, stick in, legateship, scour, lean, put down, end, stand, priorship, rate, chair, throne, severalise, primateship, bed, aeroplane, sing, incumbency, settle down, praetorship, put in



Copyright © 2020 e-Free Translation.com