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Say

verb
(past said; past part. said)
1.
Express in words.  Synonyms: state, tell.  "Tell me what is bothering you" , "State your opinion" , "State your name"
2.
Report or maintain.  Synonyms: allege, aver.  "He said it was too late to intervene in the war" , "The registrar says that I owe the school money"
3.
Express a supposition.  Synonym: suppose.  "Let's say you had a lot of money--what would you do?"
4.
Have or contain a certain wording or form.  Synonym: read.  "What does the law say?"
5.
Give instructions to or direct somebody to do something with authority.  Synonyms: enjoin, order, tell.  "She ordered him to do the shopping" , "The mother told the child to get dressed"
6.
Speak, pronounce, or utter in a certain way.  Synonyms: articulate, enounce, enunciate, pronounce, sound out.  "I cannot say 'zip wire'" , "Can the child sound out this complicated word?"
7.
Communicate or express nonverbally.  "Did his face say anything about how he felt?"
8.
Utter aloud.
9.
State as one's opinion or judgement; declare.
10.
Recite or repeat a fixed text.  "She said her 'Hail Mary'"
11.
Indicate.



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"Say" Quotes from Famous Books



... to try anything against you tonight, Major. I should say they'd give you a miss in baulk, for they must believe you invulnerable. Still, I'm going with you to ...
— The Elephant God • Gordon Casserly

... the maddened run at which Selinus scaled those steep hills caught their officer's attention. I had rehearsed what I meant to say and wasted no words. What I said conveyed ...
— Andivius Hedulio • Edward Lucas White

... about the screw being fouled," said Fitz. "I say, take the glass. They're doing something which I can't make ...
— Fitz the Filibuster • George Manville Fenn

... that father of her'n passed in his checks to-night. He'd got one warning from the Vigilantes, and yesterday they found out he was in with this gang, and they was a-going for him; but when the telegram come, he put a pistol to his head and saved them all trouble. Good riddance to everybody, I say. The sheriff's here now, and is going east on the next train to get them fellows. He's got a big posse together, and I wouldn't wonder if they was hard to hold in, after the 'boys ...
— The Denver Express - From "Belgravia" for January, 1884 • A. A. Hayes

... wager the papers aren't far from the land. That would be his way—to keep the papers near the land. 'A place for everything and everything in its place,' he used to say. What more natural than that he'd have ...
— The Motor Girls on Crystal Bay - The Secret of the Red Oar • Margaret Penrose

... personal knowledge of Galilee that Paul could not doubt that he was what he professed to be, a Nazarene. There were hundreds of Nazarenes, many of which were called Jesus: but there was only one Jesus of Nazareth. He did not say this to Jesus; but after Jesus had asked him how it was that he who had travelled the world over had never turned into Galilee, he replied that the human life of Jesus in Galilee concerned him not at all and his teaching very little. He taught all the virtues, but these were known ...
— The Brook Kerith - A Syrian story • George Moore

... right to spread that wicked report founded on a falsehood. Mr. French was at Sunrise Camp just about that time and he couldn't have got anywhere near Razor Back Mountain in hours. We have a witness to prove what we say." ...
— The Motor Maids at Sunrise Camp • Katherine Stokes

... probably, of these rhinoceros-birds, as they may be called, in thus pitching on his body, was to feed upon the ticks, and other parasitic insects, which swarm upon those animals. They also attend upon the hippopotamus, and, whether intentionally or not I cannot say, often thus give him warning of danger. Presently up rose the rhinoceros and looked about him. I, unfortunately, not intending to go far from the camp, had left my rifle behind. The dogs at that instant started off, rushing with loud barks towards the monster. They had better have kept at ...
— In the Wilds of Africa • W.H.G. Kingston

... hoping to ascertain the cause of this strange incident, which did not long remain a mystery, for they soon {235} found the very vial from which this pestilent odour was issuing. It contained a small fragment of cloth, which was thus labelled, 'Ex caligis Divi Martini Lutheri,' that is to say, 'A bit of the Breeches of Saint Martin Luther,' which the aforesaid two Lutheran ministers, by way of mockery of our piety, had slily packed up with the holy relics in the casket. The bishop instantly gave orders to burn this abominable ...
— Notes and Queries, Number 74, March 29, 1851 • Various

... human being of sound and healthful appearance from among them all. Everybody has sore eyes, some have horribly diseased scalps, sores on face and body, and all the horrible array of acquired and hereditary diseases. One's hair stands on end almost at the thought of being among them, to say nothing of eating in their presence, and of their own cooking. Of my new escort from Sin-kiang all three have dreadfully sore eyes, and one wretched mortal is as piebald as a circus pony, from head to foot, with ...
— Around the World on a Bicycle Volume II. - From Teheran To Yokohama • Thomas Stevens

... pretty well agreed that Moses and Aaron were men who actually lived and worked probably about the time attributed to them by tradition. That is to say, under the reign of Ramses II, of the Nineteenth Egyptian dynasty who reigned, as it is computed, from 1348 to 1281 B.C., and under whom the exodus occurred. Nevertheless, no very direct or conclusive ...
— The Emancipation of Massachusetts • Brooks Adams

... am very happy to learn that you have not lost hold of your "Siegfried," which is sure to be una gran bella cosa, as the Italians say. I thank ...
— Correspondence of Wagner and Liszt, Volume 1 • Francis Hueffer (translator)

... say, you have a free press," exclaimed Napoleon, "and grant to every outsider the right of speaking of things, about which he does not know any thing. With a free press no monarchy can be maintained, especially in times of danger and convulsions. You see ...
— Napoleon and the Queen of Prussia • L. Muhlbach

... correcting it before action is taken by any other player. Under the old rule, a declaration once made could not be altered, but now when the player corrects himself, as, for example, "Two Hearts—I mean three Hearts"; or "Two Spades—I should say, two Royals," the proper declaration ...
— Auction of To-day • Milton C. Work

... those we call the dead 5 Are breathers of an ampler day For ever nobler ends. They say, The solid ...
— Selections from Wordsworth and Tennyson • William Wordsworth and Alfred Lord Tennyson

... the M. O., "they look bad, some of 'em, but youth is on their side. I dare say seventy-five per cent. will get through. If ...
— Now It Can Be Told • Philip Gibbs

... observed some newspaper comment at the time, but I was exceedingly preoccupied by that little affair of the Vatican cameos, and in my anxiety to oblige the Pope I lost touch with several interesting English cases. This article, you say, ...
— Hound of the Baskervilles • Authur Conan Doyle

... known, first and last, eleven parties who hunted treasure on this island. They all quarrelled. They quarrelled, moreover, every one of them, before getting their stuff—such as it was—to the boats. Now, if you will permit me to say so, your own success—when you obtain it— will be a fluke and an absurd fluke. It will stultify every rule of precaution and violate every law of chance. I have studied this game for close upon twenty years, and reduced it almost to mathematics; and I foresee that you ...
— Poison Island • Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch (Q)

... mystery, now, of his presence on the DUNCAN. The French traveler had mistaken his vessel, and gone on board while the crew were attending the service at St. Mungo's. All was explained. But what would the learned geographer say, when he heard the name and destination of the ship, in which he had ...
— In Search of the Castaways • Jules Verne

... that they looked upon death as a great calamity. They therefore pictured life after death, except in the case of a favored few, as being hopeless and aimless. [Footnote: Homer makes the shade of the great Achilles in Hades to say:— "I would be A laborer on earth, and serve for hire Some man of mean estate, who makes scant cheer, Rather than reign o'er all who have gone down To death."—Od. XI. 489-90 [Bryant's Trans.].] The Elysian Fields, away in the land of sunset, were, indeed, filled ...
— A General History for Colleges and High Schools • P. V. N. Myers

... the Pacific that we may be said to have broken down the barriers which fenced in that ancient Monarchy. The Burlingame treaty naturally followed. Under the spirit which inspired it many thousand Chinese laborers came to the United States. No one can say that the country has not profited by their work. They were largely instrumental in constructing the railways which connect the Atlantic with the Pacific. The States of the Pacific Slope are full of evidences of their industry. Enterprises profitable alike to the capitalist and to the laborer ...
— A Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents - Section 2 (of 2) of Volume 8: Chester A. Arthur • James D. Richardson

... peculiarities of diction and of expression which, with them, are also nearly gone. Lord Cockburn has given some illustrations of these peculiarities; and I have heard others, especially connected with Jacobite partialities, of which I say nothing, as they are in fact rather strong for such a work as this. One, however, I heard lately as coming from a Forfarshire old lady of this class, which bears upon the point of "resolute" determination referred to in the learned judge's description. She had been ...
— Reminiscences of Scottish Life and Character • Edward Bannerman Ramsay

... nothing to say to that. He was too overwhelmed. He approached and pulled down the long lever. Immediately, as the platen closed, the two rollers rose smoothly across the form and over the round ink-plate, which at the same time made a quarter-revolution. At the nice adjustment and correlation of these forces Bobby ...
— The Adventures of Bobby Orde • Stewart Edward White

... said Joe, 'first, that it was a bold thing to be in the crowd at all disguised as one of them; though I won't say much about that, on second thoughts, for that's my case too. Secondly, that it was a brave and glorious action—that's what I call it—to strike that fellow off his horse before ...
— Barnaby Rudge • Charles Dickens

... flying then beware, Unless you take the air, Like woodcock, crane, or goose. But stop; you're not in plight For such adventurous flight, O'er desert waves and sands, In search of other lands. Hence, then, to save your precious souls, Remaineth but to say, 'Twill be the safest way, To chuck yourselves in holes.' Before she had thus far gone, The birdlings, tired of hearing, And laughing more than fearing, Set up a greater jargon Than did, before the Trojan slaughter, The Trojans round old Priam's daughter.[9] And many a bird, in prison ...
— The Fables of La Fontaine - A New Edition, With Notes • Jean de La Fontaine

... Philip, 'balls are the fashion just now. What do you say, Amy, [he was more inclined to patronize her than any one else] to the gaieties we are ...
— The Heir of Redclyffe • Charlotte M. Yonge

... yet, have ye? Who's Old Thunder? said I, again riveted with the insane earnestness of his manner. Captain Ahab. What! the captain of our ship, the Pequod? Aye, among some of us old sailor chaps, he goes by that name. Ye hav'n't seen him yet, have ye? No, we hav'n't. He's sick they say, but is getting better, and will be all right again before long. All right again before long! laughed the stranger, with a solemnly derisive sort of laugh. Look ye; when captain Ahab is all right, then this left ...
— Moby-Dick • Melville

... tell you that I do not stand on my defence; and I thought I should see you the next day. You went: and not a word for me! You gave me no chance. If you have no confidence in me I must bear it. I may say the story is false. With your hand in mine I would ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... hardly regret if it duly impressed his children with the folly and unkindness of village gossip. He declared he could not be satisfied without apologising,—well, then, without explaining, to Mrs Hope how it had happened; and he would do it through the medium of Mr Hope; for, to say the truth, he was ashamed to face Mrs Hope till his peace was made. Margaret laughed at this, and begged him to go home with her; but he preferred stepping over to Mrs Enderby's, where Mr Hope had just been seen to enter. ...
— Deerbrook • Harriet Martineau

... "Say of me as the Heavenly said, 'Thou art The blessedest of women!'—blessedest, Not holiest, not noblest,—no high name, Whose height misplaced may pierce me like a shame, When I ...
— Personal Friendships of Jesus • J. R. Miller

... "Some uncharitable persons say that old Bourbon valor inspires our generals in the field, but it is plain that Dutch courage was not needed on board of ...
— The Lincoln Story Book • Henry L. Williams

... conscience, ordered to be thrown into the sea. As I am making, in another letter, a longer report to your Majesty in the matter above mentioned, referring to the auditor Don Alvaro, I shall add nothing more in this, except to say that his case must be dropped, and the Audiencia will be obliged to do so, through its need of judges. The auditor Don Antonio Rodriguez has not been present at it for a long time, although I have warned and commanded him to do ...
— The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898, Volume XX, 1621-1624 • Various

... a messenger came up to say that his horse was saddled and ready. He was about to descend the escalera, when a large closely-cropped head—with a circular patch about the size of a blister shaven out of the crown—made its appearance over the stone-work ...
— The White Chief - A Legend of Northern Mexico • Mayne Reid

... go, there's a good fellow. You saved my life, I may say, and that gives me a claim on you." Buckley frowned, but said nothing. "If you get among your old mates," continued Jack, "and begin to taste, you're a gone man. God has been very good to us. He has made us rich. We may live to be useful, Jacob. ...
— Philosopher Jack • R.M. Ballantyne

... imperceptibly prepared for them through the ages. We are in the habit of beginning the history of the English novel with Defoe or Richardson; but was there no work of the kind in England before their time? had they to invent it all, matter and method? It is not enough to say that the gift of observation and analysis was inborn in the race, as shown already, long before the eighteenth century, in the work of the dramatists, moralists and philosophers. Had not the same gift already manifested ...
— The English Novel in the Time of Shakespeare • J. J. Jusserand

... one another too well not to be perfectly frank. How much of last night was just—what shall I say—nervous tension? Supposing some other girl had ...
— Mufti • H. C. (Herman Cyril) McNeile

... did. He said he had never been more wretched. "Why," I asked, "was your mouth not always full of the 'Greek spirit,' and did you not mock the Christians and their religion? And, as to their heaven, did you not say that it was a tedious place, full of pious old ladies and Philistines? And are you not got to the paradise of the Greeks? What, then, ails you with your lot?" "Sir," said he, "to be plain with you, I do not understand a word these ...
— In the Wrong Paradise • Andrew Lang

... spoilt, too," said the boy, looking away thoughtfully. "I don't know what to say—but sometime, maybe, you will know me better and believe me." He spoke with ...
— Darrel of the Blessed Isles • Irving Bacheller

... "I say, Duke," she called, "you have got a sweet place here. We have been watching for the monk to pass, but he has ...
— The Reflections of Ambrosine - A Novel • Elinor Glyn

... of the following day, Arthur was to leave Vellenaux for Southampton en route for the East. He had put off his leave takings until the last moment, and he now entered his patron's private library to say farewell. The parting was more like what might have been expected between a kind father and a favourite son. "Remember, Arthur," said the kind old Baronet, in conclusion, "that, should your regiment be suddenly ordered home, it will always afford me the ...
— Vellenaux - A Novel • Edmund William Forrest

... Attorney-Generals in every State have been most courteous and obliging when appealed to for assistance. The laws for women, however, have been so taken from and added to, so torn to pieces and patched up, that the best lawyers in many States say frankly that they do not know just what they are at the present time. Legislatures and code revision committees are continually tinkering at them and every year witnesses some changes in most of the States.[153] A very thorough abstract of the laws, made in 1886 ...
— The History of Woman Suffrage, Volume IV • Various

... if you had but suffered me to stay with you! Oh! the baron, what will he say?" and so she went on. Her state had but just been discovered; it had been supposed that she was fatigued, and was sleeping late, until a few minutes before. The surgeon of the town had been sent for, and the landlord of the inn was trying vainly to enforce ...
— The Grey Woman and other Tales • Mrs. (Elizabeth) Gaskell

... decent slaughtering) in the matter of Canterbury lamb. I rather like to think of the red dagger of London on the wholesome bottled ales of her great (municipalized) breweries, and Maidstone or Rochester, let us say, boasting a special reputation for jam or pickles. Good honest food all of it will be, made by honest unsweated women and men, with the pride of broad vales and uplands, counties, principalities and great cities behind it. Each county and municipality ...
— New Worlds For Old - A Plain Account of Modern Socialism • Herbert George Wells

... around this town and so wonderful was the French organization that they could be shifted to any part of the long battle line almost at a moment's notice. There seemed to be an endless supply of equipment as well as of men and no longer could France say that she was unprepared. The whole question now was whether she was prepared enough to undertake the great offensive the soldiers ...
— Fighting in France • Ross Kay

... village of that name, which stands on the other side of the hill, Don Jorge," replied the herrador. "Vaya! it is a strange place, that castle; some say it was built by the Moors in the old times, and some by the Christians when they first laid siege to Toledo. It is not inhabited now, save by rabbits, which breed there in abundance amongst the long grass and broken stones, and by eagles and vultures, which build on the tops of the towers; I ...
— The Bible in Spain • George Borrow

... her be a sort of reflex, say, perhaps the effect of having sold herself for money and position. In other words, does she, did she, ever love him? We don't know that. Might it not prey on her mind, until with the kind help of his precious relatives even Nature herself could not stand the strain— especially in the delicate ...
— The War Terror • Arthur B. Reeve

... say, Mrs. Pennycook, is that Donna Corblay's taking a mighty big interest in a man she's never even been introduced to. Still, I'm not surprised at anything she'd do, the stuck-up thing. She just thinks she's ...
— The Long Chance • Peter B. Kyne

... and privileges are in themselves good, but to make ourselves worthy of them is infinitely better. It is encouraging and gratifying to know that so many are getting a correct interpretation of life's deeper meanings and are daily coming into possession of higher and purer ideals. Who can say that the Negro has not made progress ...
— Twentieth Century Negro Literature - Or, A Cyclopedia of Thought on the Vital Topics Relating - to the American Negro • Various

... they were entering Laroche Station; there was a stop to change engines. The officer suddenly awoke and got out. The compartment holding Josephine and her companion was thrown open, and, strange to say, his neighbour, the collegian, had moved into it, sitting ...
— The Exploits of Juve - Being the Second of the Series of the "Fantmas" Detective Tales • mile Souvestre and Marcel Allain

... "I say, Mater," the Crown Prince called out a few minutes afterwards outside his Mother's door, "how much longer are you and the Guv'nor going to be? ...
— In Brief Authority • F. Anstey

... certainly no intention of leaving the room, but before she could say so, M. Casimir stepped forward. "I think," he dryly observed, "that mademoiselle had ...
— The Count's Millions - Volume 1 (of 2) • Emile Gaboriau

... It then proceeds to say: "We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are created equal; that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights; that among them is life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness; that to secure these rights, Governments are ...
— Cotton is King and The Pro-Slavery Arguments • Various

... Harsanyi did not say much even to his wife about his discovery. He brooded upon it in a curious way. He found that these unscientific singing lessons stimulated him in his own study. After Miss Kronborg left him he often lay down in his studio for an hour before dinner, with his head full of musical ideas, with ...
— Song of the Lark • Willa Cather

... poor man so deeply," said she to her mother, laughing, "that if I would say Yes, I believe ...
— The Muse of the Department • Honore de Balzac

... what I call them tramps!' she cried. 'I know what I'd do wi' 'em. I'd take ivery man-jack of 'em by the scruff o' his neck, an' set him at a job, that I would, as sure as my name's Hester Slade. An' I'd say to him: "When that's done ye'll get sommat to eat, an' not afore." That's wot I'd say. "Work or starve!"' And Mrs. Slade waved the bread-knife above her head, as if it were a sword flourished in defiance of the whole ...
— The Wolf Patrol - A Tale of Baden-Powell's Boy Scouts • John Finnemore

... nothing bad," said he, curling himself into a long chair with a studious affectation of the Colonel's languor after a hot parade. He buried his freckled nose in a tea-cup and, with eyes staring roundly over the rim, asked:—"I say, Coppy, is it ...
— Indian Tales • Rudyard Kipling

... me, I should say. Fifty thousand francs." The Captain unconsciously assumed an air of some importance as he mentioned this sum. "So I was bound to pursue ...
— Captain Dieppe • Anthony Hope

... and he straightway gave Manabozho such a length and spread of tail that it was continually getting between his legs, and it was so heavy that it was as much as he could do to carry it. But, having asked for it, he was ashamed to say a word, and they all started off in company, dashing ...
— The Junior Classics, Volume 1 • Willam Patten

... concerned, to follow the lights of the Constitution as expounded and illustrated by those whose opinions and expositions constitute the standard of my political faith in regard to the powers of the Federal Government. It is, I trust, not necessary to say that no grandeur of enterprise and no present urgent inducement promising popular favor will lead me to disregard those lights or to depart from that path which experience has proved to be safe, and which is now radiant with the glow of prosperity and legitimate constitutional progress. ...
— A Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents - Section 3 (of 4) of Volume 5: Franklin Pierce • James D. Richardson

... You say that Hester is the woman to complement your man. This sounds like a lover, only I happen to know that she is not the irresistible woman. I found it out quite by accident—a few words dropped into a letter, a corroboration of the fact and further committal, a protracted defence ...
— The Kempton-Wace Letters • Jack London

... and the solemn act by which he was deposed; were the rapid occurrences of a few weeks: and thus the grandest revolution that England had ever seen was happily consummated. Without entering here on legislative reasonings or party sophisms, it is enough to record the act itself; and to say, in reference to our more immediate subject, that without the assistance of Holland and her glorious chief, England might have still remained enslaved, or have had to purchase liberty by oceans of blood. By the ...
— Holland - The History of the Netherlands • Thomas Colley Grattan

... this Silas Merrick was an older brother to Sid Merrick, the rascal who stole the bonds, and whom you heard mentioned by Cuffer and Shelley. Let me say here that Silas Merrick is dead, and when he died he left all his property to his brother Sidney and his sister. The sister is dead, too, and her property, so I understand, went to her ...
— The Rover Boys on Treasure Isle - or The Strange Cruise of the Steam Yacht. • Edward Stratemeyer (AKA Arthur M. Winfield)

... garden into the Park, and there met with Roger Pepys, and he and I to walk in the Pell Mell. I find by him that the House of Parliament continues full of ill humours, and he seems to dislike those that are troublesome more than needs, and do say how, in their late Poll Bill, which cost so much time, the yeomanry, and indeed two-thirds of the nation, are left out to be taxed, that there is not effectual provision enough made for collecting of the money; ...
— Diary of Samuel Pepys, Complete • Samuel Pepys

... run in the way of His commandments; fatherhood and brotherhood and sonship will not be symbols, shibboleths of pious intercourse, but ways of God's reaching out through us for the total brotherhood. We shall silence the caviler against missions; we shall raise the negro in the face of those who say he can not be raised; we shall see the latter-day miracles, and the lame man healed and rejoicing at the Temple gate. Thus may the breath of God sweep across our pastorates and dismiss timidity, provincialism, ease, and narrowness of outlook. And thus may ...
— The World's Great Sermons, Volume 10 (of 10) • Various

... over fist; perhaps therein lay a sufficient reason why the man of science in him was fascinated. True, those discoveries which he made were new only to him; yet one might say the same of America and Columbus. For one thing, it dawned on him that here was a new and excellent technical vocabulary; he stored away in his brain strange words as a squirrel sticks nuts and acorns into a hole. Hondo, tapaderos, bad hombre, tecolote, bronco, maverick, side-winder—rapaciously ...
— The Desert Valley • Jackson Gregory

... this company got anything to say that is detrimental to Miss Bright?" he asked with ...
— Banked Fires • E. W. (Ethel Winifred) Savi

... "Well, I must say I don't know whom to believe," said Randy Fairwell slowly. He turned to the boys. "Who ...
— The Rover Boys on the Great Lakes • Arthur M. Winfield

... he began quietly moving northward, and in a few steps had put the hollow between us two and the other five. Then he looked at me and nodded, as much as to say: "Here is a narrow corner," as, indeed, I thought it was. His looks were now quite friendly, and I was so revolted at these constant changes that I could not forbear whispering: "So you've changed ...
— Treasure Island • Robert Louis Stevenson

... scalp. There should not be so many. When the buffaloes came in the largest droves, our fathers used to go out to hunt them in the strongest parties. Their sons should do the same. We are the sons of those fathers. They say we look like them, talk like them, live like them—we should ACT like them. Let another speak, for I ...
— Oak Openings • James Fenimore Cooper

... become an important feature and assume the character of decoration. The heavy wooden handles are elaborately carved, and the suggestions of figures given by the interlaced cords are carried out in such detail that at a little distance it is impossible to say where the real textile surface ceases ...
— A Study Of The Textile Art In Its Relation To The Development Of Form And Ornament • William H. Holmes

... neither, is of no consequence and meant nothing. To have commenced, "Ye villains and cut-throats, disperse at once, or I'll mow you down with grape-shot!" might have sounded very brave, but if that was all he was going to say, he ...
— The Great Riots of New York 1712 to 1873 • J.T. Headley

... students' festival in which the professors and other senior members of a university take part, and at which outsiders are allowed to look on. The presiding students appear in vollem Wichs, as we should say in their war paint, with sashes and rapiers. Young and old together drink beer, sing songs, make speeches, and in honour of one or the other they "rub a Salamander,"—a word which is said to be a corruption ...
— Home Life in Germany • Mrs. Alfred Sidgwick

... brother Aminias raising his mutilated arm—he had lost his hand in the battle of Salamis. Socrates stands his trial, and has to drink hemlock. Even great statesmen like Pericles had become entangled in the obnoxious opinions. No one has anything to say in explanation of the marvellous disappearance of demigods and heroes, why miracles are ended, or why human actions alone are now to be seen in the world. An ignorant public demands the instant punishment ...
— History of the Intellectual Development of Europe, Volume I (of 2) - Revised Edition • John William Draper

... James Lawley; his father had been hanged for putting lights in cocoanut trees where they didn't belong. But he was a good cook, and knew his business; and it wasn't soup-and-bully and dog's-body every Sunday. That's what I meant to say. On Sunday the cook called both those boys Jim, and on week-days he called them Jack. He used to say he must be right sometimes if he did that, because even the hands on a painted clock point right twice ...
— Man Overboard! • F(rancis) Marion Crawford

... said that abortive and useless organs exist for the sake of symmetry, or as parts of a plan. To say this, and stop there, is a fine instance of mere seeming to say something. For, under the principle of design, what is the sense of introducing useless parts into a useful organism, and what shadow of explanation does "symmetry" ...
— Darwiniana - Essays and Reviews Pertaining to Darwinism • Asa Gray

... is to say, my brother, sisters and self—were obliged to leave the house and go out into the world to earn our living. We never went there again, and never heard if any of the ...
— Animal Ghosts - Or, Animal Hauntings and the Hereafter • Elliott O'Donnell

... smoke, and words such as she had heard him speak in Abbey-wood resolve to emptiness. Nay, it humiliated her personally, and the baronet's shrewd prognostication humiliated her. For how should he know, and dare to say, that love was a thing of the dust that could be trodden out under the heel of science? But he had said so; and he had proved himself right. She heard with wonderment that Richard of his own accord had spoken to his ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... between a work and the public mind. The millet seed may be intrinsically less valuable than a pearl; but the hungry cock wisely neglected the pearl, because pearls could not, and millet seeds could, appease his hunger. Who shall say how much of the subsequent success of a once neglected work is due to the preparation of the public mind through the works which for ...
— The Principles of Success in Literature • George Henry Lewes

... of so cruel a slavery, I take it upon myself, giving you pledges, to promise that you will receive at our hands those benefits which the Sicilians lately hoped for, and with regard to which they were unable to say that we ...
— Procopius - History of the Wars, Books V. and VI. • Procopius

... say of a woman such as this? She had no morals, and her manners were outrageous. The love she felt was the love of a she-wolf. Fourteen biographies of her have been written, besides her own autobiography, which ...
— Famous Affinities of History, Vol 1-4, Complete - The Romance of Devotion • Lyndon Orr

... pressure, and where it ought to remain over night in order to make it entirely flat and solid. A better way of pressing a book at this stage of the operation is to pass it several times through a rolling machine, which is made for this special purpose with two heavy iron rollers, say twenty inches long and ten inches in diameter. These machines are seldom used in America, but are invariably found in the equipment of binders' workshops abroad, which is perhaps one reason why English ...
— The Building of a Book • Various

... testament. He did devise his moneys for the best, And lies in Brentford church in peaceful rest. Prince Edward lived, and money made and spent; But his good sire was wrong, it is confess'd, To say his son, young Thomas, never lent. He did. Young Thomas lent at interest, And nobly took his ...
— Successful Recitations • Various

... say, and it is the regret of our life, that we were not one of the editors present at the Saint Cecilia. This, therefore, relieves us of the implied condition to adhere any longer to this silly and absurd custom which, in the language ...
— American Adventures - A Second Trip 'Abroad at home' • Julian Street

... it say in the newspapers?" asked Freddie. "They always know what the weather is going ...
— The Bobbsey Twins - Or, Merry Days Indoors and Out • Laura Lee Hope

... is probably a copy of the second edition of the Catena Aurea of Aquinas printed? The folio in question, which consists of 417 unnumbered leaves, is an extremely fine one, and I should say that it is certainly of German origin. Seemiller (i. 117.) refers it to Esslingen, and perhaps an acquaintance with its water-marks would afford some assistance in tracing it. Of these a rose is the most common, and a strigilis may be seen on folio 61. It would be ...
— Notes and Queries, Number 51, October 19, 1850 • Various

... before all the church, to go up to the pulpitt, to preach without it. All this day soldiers going up and down the towne, there being an alarme, and many Quakers and other clapped up; but I believe without any reason: only they say in Dorsetshire there ...
— The Diary of Samuel Pepys • Samuel Pepys

... which I have the honour to represent, it was suggested to me that it was necessary for me to give a lecture, and it was further explained to me that it did not really very much matter as to what I lectured about. I am bound to say there was a very great charm to me in the idea of lecturing my constituents. I know it does sometimes occur that constituents lecture their representatives, especially in Scotland, and I was anxious, if I might, to have an opportunity of lecturing those who had so many opportunities ...
— The Law and Lawyers of Pickwick - A Lecture • Frank Lockwood

... nature of women, says, "Men, perhaps, for the sake of some advantage will commit one crime; but woman, to gratify one inclination, will not scruple to perpetrate all sorts of wickedness." Thus Juvenal, speaking of women, say, ...
— The Itinerary of Archibishop Baldwin through Wales • Giraldus Cambrensis

... answered: 'They are all out!' Of course I had betrayed myself—but it is impossible to think of everything at once. Oh! yes—you may laugh. And he smiled too—he is a very handsome fellow—and desired me most pressingly to open the door as he had something of the greatest importance to say to me. I said he could talk very well through the gap at the top; that Pyramus and Thisbe had even kissed through a chink in a wall. But he would not see the joke; he got graver and more earnest, and insisted, saying that our fate, his and mine, hung on that hour, and that not a soul ...
— Uarda • Georg Ebers

... instructions, for that bodice, these sleeves, those skirts, this cut, that stitch, this embroidery, that lace, this wire, those knots, that ruff, those roses, this girdle, that fanne, the t'other scarf, these gloves? Ha! what say you, lady? ...
— Epicoene - Or, The Silent Woman • Ben Jonson

... writ, a policeman is like a small boy with a shotgun," remarked Moonlight—"he must let it off. I don't say you're guilty, Tresco, but I say the minions of the Law will have you in their clutches if ...
— The Tale of Timber Town • Alfred Grace

... Mr Slope,' continued Eleanor; 'but I have explained this to papa already; and as you do not seem to approve of what I say, Dr Grantly, I will with your permission leave you and papa together,' and so saying she walked out of ...
— Barchester Towers • Anthony Trollope

... good as I ought to be, my dear,' said Dr Pendle, playfully pinching her pretty ear. 'Well! well! I must see George. I'll go to-morrow morning at eight o'clock. You'll send a telegram to Mr Vasser to that effect, if you please, Mr Cargrim. Say that I regret not being ...
— The Bishop's Secret • Fergus Hume

... belongs to the sphere of knowledge and views of antiquity, as well as of immediate perception of nature in general; and that we cannot expect any scientific explanation from it, because man really came last on the stage of earth, and is therefore not able to say anything, founded upon autopsy, about the origin of all the other creatures which preceded his appearance. Just as little could the first men possess and deliver to their offspring a remembrance of the first beginnings ...
— The Theories of Darwin and Their Relation to Philosophy, Religion, and Morality • Rudolf Schmid

... their light fell it flashed on the bright-coloured handkerchiefs which the women of this village twisted round their heads like turbans, and pinned across their bosoms. I think it is absurd, though, to say that German peasants dance well. They enjoy the exercise immensely, but are heavy and loutish in their movements, and they flounder about in a grotesque way with their hands on each other's shoulders. At a Kirchweih they ...
— Home Life in Germany • Mrs. Alfred Sidgwick

... bequeathed by the old Dukes, 'for masses to be said on their behalf.' He goes to look at the place; questions the Monks on this point, who are all drawn out in two rows, and have broken into TE-DEUM at sight of him: 'Husht! You still say those Masses, then?' 'Certainly, your Majesty!'—'And what good does anybody get of them?' 'Your Majesty, those old Sovereigns are to obtain Heavenly mercy by them, to be delivered out of Purgatory by them.'—'Purgatory? It is a sore thing for the Forests, all ...
— History of Friedrich II. of Prussia, Vol. XI. (of XXI.) • Thomas Carlyle

... smoke. To be sure, you might have travelled in a Nichtraucher or a Damen-Coupe, but changes are a nuisance on a journey. Besides, you know that a Damen-Coupe is always crowded, and that the moment you open a window someone will hold a handkerchief tearfully to her neck and say, "Aber ich bitte meine Dame: es zieht!" and all the other women in the carriage will say in chorus, "Ja! ja! es zieht!" and if you don't shut the window instantly the conductor will be summoned, and he will give the case against ...
— Home Life in Germany • Mrs. Alfred Sidgwick

... are very popular in Paris, that would make no sensation at Vienna or Berlin; and, vice versa, we cannot imagine how the French can possibly enter into the spirit of many of the best known authors of Deutschland. In England, we are happy to say we can appreciate them all. History, philology, philosophy—in short, all the modes and subdivisions of heavy authorship—we leave out of the question, and address ourselves, on this occasion, to the distinctive characteristics of the two schools of light literature—schools ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 54, No. 337, November, 1843 • Various

... party that they must not tarry round the lunch-table, and before Mr. Simlins had a chance to say anything more he had on his mind, the principal personages of the day were receiving Judge Harrison and his daughter in the other room. Mr. Simlins looked on, somewhat grimly, but with inward delight and exultation deep and strong. Miss Sophy was affectionate, the judge very kind; the congratulations ...
— Say and Seal, Volume II • Susan Warner

... this passage is frequently introduced into exhortations to the unconverted. It is addressed exclusively to professors of religion—to those who profess to have set out for the Celestial City, and seems to say, Beware of the form of godliness without its power—of the profession without the possession! For, as old Mason truly said, "They fall deepest into hell that fall backward." The "striving" here alluded to refers to the whole course ...
— The Works of John Bunyan • John Bunyan

... to White Hall, where, after four o'clock, comes my Lord Privy Seale, [William, first Viscount, and second Baron Say and Sele, made Lord Privy Seal at the Restoration. Ob. April, 1662.] and so we went up to his chamber over the gate at White Hall, where he asked me what deputacon I had from my Lord, I told him none; but that I am sworn my Lord's deputy by both of the Secretarys, ...
— The Diary of Samuel Pepys • Samuel Pepys

... seen him at it myself, and can vouch for it, that if ever there was a born fiend let loose on this earth it's the Wild Man of the West when he sets-to to thrash a dozen Indians. But I must do him the justice to say that I never heard of him making an unprovoked attack on anybody. When he first came to these mountains, many years ago—before I came here—the Indians used to wonder who he was and what he meant to ...
— The Wild Man of the West - A Tale of the Rocky Mountains • R.M. Ballantyne

... the clergyman had, by promptitude and dexterity, taken the chair and was opening the case against the unfortunate Jessie. I regret to have to say that my heroine had been appalled by the visible array of public opinion against her excursion, to the pitch of tears. She was sitting with flushed cheeks and swimming eyes at the end of the table opposite to the clergyman. She held her handkerchief crumpled ...
— The Wheels of Chance - A Bicycling Idyll • H. G. Wells

... compared with flat want in that respect. It remains true, and will remain, what I have often told you, that properly there is no voice in this world which is completely human to me, which fully understands all I say and with clear sympathy and sense answers to me, but your voice only. That is a curious fact, and not quite a joyful one to me. The solitude, the silence of my poor soul, in the centre of this roaring whirlpool called Universe, is great, always, and sometimes ...
— The Correspondence of Thomas Carlyle and Ralph Waldo Emerson, 1834-1872, Vol II. • Thomas Carlyle and Ralph Waldo Emerson

... I didn't say that. Did I, boy? But we are too close and if we are too close there's got to be a reason for it. If we stay too close too long, O.K. Then we're plunging into the sun. Right now, ...
— A Place in the Sun • C.H. Thames

... the difference of men's talk! Some say that Lambert must of necessity yield up; others, that he is very strong, and that the Fifth-monarchy-men will stick to him, if he declares for a free Parliament. Chillington was sent yesterday to ...
— The Diary of Samuel Pepys • Samuel Pepys

... Verne could scarce repress a hearty laugh and her large, deep violet eyes sparkled, and from their changing expressions exhibited such variety of shade that one would scarce venture to say which was the ...
— Marguerite Verne • Agatha Armour

... no occasion of showing to the several States their situation, but hitherto without success; and, unless some unforeseen event turns up very speedily, it is impossible to say what may be the consequences. However, it is our business to hope all things, and that Providence, who has hitherto carried us through our difficulties, will, I ...
— The Diplomatic Correspondence of the American Revolution, Vol. XI • Various

... I ever am, I will take measures for sending the French remnant to their own land; nor shall my Courcelles quit thee till she hath seen thee safe in the keeping of Madame de Lorraine or of Queen Louise, who is herself a kinswoman of ours, and, they say, is piety ...
— Unknown to History - A Story of the Captivity of Mary of Scotland • Charlotte M. Yonge

... of Nitrazol C given will suffice for all shades dyed with from 2 to 4 per cent, of dye-stuff, but when paler shades are dyed, using less than say 1/2 per cent. of dye-stuff, about 4 lb. Nitrazol C, with the soda and acetate of soda in proportionate quantities, may ...
— The Dyeing of Cotton Fabrics - A Practical Handbook for the Dyer and Student • Franklin Beech

... consequence to me as Mr. Wilson's is to him. I am as sensitive to feeling as he. If I mistake not, the day will come when the negro will learn that he can get his freedom by fighting for it; and should that time arrive, the whites will be sorry that they have hated us so shamefully. I am free to say that, could I live my life over again, I would use all the energies which God has given me ...
— Clotelle - The Colored Heroine • William Wells Brown

... did, my son. And I meant to say to thee that it much pleaseth me that thou art grown so well, and of such a strangely fair countenance. Also the garden is such as I have never before beheld it, which must needs be due to thy care. But wherefore didst thou not tell me of ...
— Jackanapes, Daddy Darwin's Dovecot and Other Stories • Juliana Horatio Ewing

... To say that dreams, in general, are mere fantasies, or the results of imagination, and have no real basis in consciousness, is folly; for dreams are of many ...
— The New Avatar and The Destiny of the Soul - The Findings of Natural Science Reduced to Practical Studies - in Psychology • Jirah D. Buck

... both constitutional and local. Attend to the organs of digestion. Give a moderate dose of opening medicine, to clear away offending matter. This simple aperient may be repeated occasionally, say once a week, and if diarrhoea be present it may be checked by the addition of a little morphia or dilute sulphuric acid. Cream of tartar with sulphur is an excellent derivative, being both diuretic and diaphoretic, but it must not be given in doses ...
— Dogs and All About Them • Robert Leighton

... said, at last, shaking his head. "I've been staring at the fire till I'm dizzy. What was I going to say?" ...
— Indian Tales • Rudyard Kipling

... difficult may come to pass, with assistance of wisdom and patience; as, for example, Jingling Geordie, look here!" And he displayed the recovered treasure to the eyes of the astonished jeweller, exclaiming, with great triumph, "What say ye to that, Jingler?—By my sceptre and crown, the man stares as if he took his native prince for a warlock! us that are the very malleus maleficarum, the contunding and contriturating hammer of all witches, sorcerers, magicians, and the like; he thinks ...
— The Fortunes of Nigel • Sir Walter Scott

... States at the time of his death, a little more than a hundred years ago, was George Washington, with his land and his slaves; and so in England and France there were no rich men in the modern sense—that is to say, no men who controlled great masses of productive capital. The men of wealth were those who held landed estates. The chief business of all countries was agriculture. The capitalistic system in industry and trade existed in its rudiments ...
— The business career in its public relations • Albert Shaw

... lesson to learn, do not look at it all at once, and say, I cannot learn this long lesson; but divide it into small parts, and say to yourself, I will try to learn this first little part, and after I have learned that, I will rest two or three minutes, and then I will learn another ...
— Parker's Second Reader • Richard G. Parker

... been the object of any general popular clamour, such as that against general warrants, an abusive practice undoubtedly, but such a one as was not likely to occasion any general oppression. There is scarce a poor man in England, of forty years of age, I will venture to say, who has not, in some part of his life, felt himself most cruelly oppressed by this ...
— An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations • Adam Smith

... is not worthy my lady's presence, I dare say," she remarked. "After the magnificence of barrack life and the splendor of Hunsden Hall, I scarcely wonder she can not stoop to your mother's jointure house. A lady in her position must draw ...
— The Baronet's Bride • May Agnes Fleming

... dead (poisoned, so people say, but this is never proved), and his mother has lost her mind (she is travelling through her domains with the coffin containing the body of her departed husband), the child is left to the strict discipline of his Aunt Margaret. Forced to rule ...
— The Story of Mankind • Hendrik van Loon

... ye're so anxious," replied the other. "'Tis me have got three drinks of Monongahaly in me that says I can whip you or anny man of your boat. And if that aint cause for ye to come ashore, 'tis no fighting man ye are, an' I'll say that ...
— The Magnificent Adventure - Being the Story of the World's Greatest Exploration and - the Romance of a Very Gallant Gentleman • Emerson Hough

... Emmeline think me a harsh intruder on her private thoughts, if I say I cannot let this letter go till I have seen at least some parts of its contents?" she said very mildly, but so firmly I had no power to resist her; and when she asked if I would not, as I always did, read her ...
— The Mother's Recompense, Volume I. - A Sequel to Home Influence in Two Volumes. • Grace Aguilar

... my guns, and most of my munitions are being destroyed; and officers have gone to Khalil, who is at Madug, to say am ready to surrender. I must have some food here, and cannot hold on any more. Khalil has been told to-day, and a deputation of officers has gone on a launch to bring some food ...
— The Story of the Great War, Volume V (of 8) • Francis J. (Francis Joseph) Reynolds, Allen L. (Allen Leon)

... Martyr to my greif for the loss of Augustus.. One fatal swoon has cost me my Life.. Beware of swoons Dear Laura.... A frenzy fit is not one quarter so pernicious; it is an exercise to the Body and if not too violent, is I dare say conducive to Health in its consequences—Run mad as often as you chuse; ...
— Persuasion • Jane Austen



Words linked to "Say" :   accentuate, raise, represent, nasalise, plead, accent, direct, introduce, round, explain, devoice, append, asseverate, syllabize, show, stress, lilt, verbalise, give, labialise, assert, subvocalize, order, call, sum, record, opportunity, express, require, enunciate, vowelise, add, chance, subvocalise, retroflex, roll, trill, drawl, nasalize, maintain, say farewell, voice, command, misstate, sound, labialize, tell, aspirate, remark, summarise, convey, verbalize, lay out, click, observe, instruct, vocalise, speak, palatalise, misspeak, recite, premise, summarize, palatalize, respond, declare, request, preface, note, answer, twang, saying, articulate, precede, allege, announce, that is to say, get out, have, mention, feature, syllabise, vowelize, give tongue to, send for, warn, sum up, register, reply, explode, supply, flap, utter, mouth, present, mispronounce, vocalize, talk, sibilate, lisp, speculate



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