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Take   /teɪk/   Listen
Take

verb
(past took; past part. taken; pres. part. taking)
1.
Carry out.  "Take steps" , "Take vengeance"
2.
Require (time or space).  Synonyms: occupy, use up.  "This event occupied a very short time"
3.
Take somebody somewhere.  Synonyms: conduct, direct, guide, lead.  "Can you take me to the main entrance?" , "He conducted us to the palace"
4.
Get into one's hands, take physically.  Synonym: get hold of.  "Can you take this bag, please"
5.
Take on a certain form, attribute, or aspect.  Synonyms: acquire, adopt, assume, take on.  "The story took a new turn" , "He adopted an air of superiority" , "She assumed strange manners" , "The gods assume human or animal form in these fables"
6.
Interpret something in a certain way; convey a particular meaning or impression.  Synonym: read.  "How should I take this message?" , "You can't take credit for this!"
7.
Take something or somebody with oneself somewhere.  Synonyms: bring, convey.  "Take these letters to the boss" , "This brings me to the main point"
8.
Take into one's possession.  "I'll take three salmon steaks"
9.
Travel or go by means of a certain kind of transportation, or a certain route.  "She takes Route 1 to Newark"
10.
Pick out, select, or choose from a number of alternatives.  Synonyms: choose, pick out, select.  "Choose a good husband for your daughter" , "She selected a pair of shoes from among the dozen the salesgirl had shown her"
11.
Receive willingly something given or offered.  Synonyms: accept, have.  "I won't have this dog in my house!" , "Please accept my present"
12.
Assume, as of positions or roles.  Synonyms: fill, occupy.  "He occupies the position of manager" , "The young prince will soon occupy the throne"
13.
Take into consideration for exemplifying purposes.  Synonyms: consider, deal, look at.  "Consider the following case"
14.
Require as useful, just, or proper.  Synonyms: ask, call for, demand, involve, necessitate, need, postulate, require.  "Success usually requires hard work" , "This job asks a lot of patience and skill" , "This position demands a lot of personal sacrifice" , "This dinner calls for a spectacular dessert" , "This intervention does not postulate a patient's consent"
15.
Experience or feel or submit to.  "Take the plunge"
16.
Make a film or photograph of something.  Synonyms: film, shoot.  "Shoot a movie"
17.
Remove something concrete, as by lifting, pushing, or taking off, or remove something abstract.  Synonyms: remove, take away, withdraw.  "Remove a wrapper" , "Remove the dirty dishes from the table" , "Take the gun from your pocket" , "This machine withdraws heat from the environment"
18.
Serve oneself to, or consume regularly.  Synonyms: consume, have, ingest, take in.  "I don't take sugar in my coffee"
19.
Accept or undergo, often unwillingly.  Synonym: submit.
20.
Make use of or accept for some purpose.  Synonym: accept.  "Take an opportunity"
21.
Take by force.  "The army took the fort on the hill"
22.
Occupy or take on.  Synonyms: assume, strike, take up.  "She took her seat on the stage" , "We took our seats in the orchestra" , "She took up her position behind the tree" , "Strike a pose"
23.
Admit into a group or community.  Synonyms: accept, admit, take on.  "We'll have to vote on whether or not to admit a new member"
24.
Ascertain or determine by measuring, computing or take a reading from a dial.  "A reading was taken of the earth's tremors"
25.
Be a student of a certain subject.  Synonyms: learn, read, study.
26.
Take as an undesirable consequence of some event or state of affairs.  Synonyms: claim, exact.  "The hard work took its toll on her"
27.
Head into a specified direction.  Synonym: make.  "We made for the mountains"
28.
Point or cause to go (blows, weapons, or objects such as photographic equipment) towards.  Synonyms: aim, direct, take aim, train.  "He trained his gun on the burglar" , "Don't train your camera on the women" , "Take a swipe at one's opponent"
29.
Be seized or affected in a specified way.  "Be taken drunk"
30.
Have with oneself; have on one's person.  Synonyms: carry, pack.  "I always carry money" , "She packs a gun when she goes into the mountains"
31.
Engage for service under a term of contract.  Synonyms: charter, engage, hire, lease, rent.  "Let's rent a car" , "Shall we take a guide in Rome?"
32.
Receive or obtain regularly.  Synonyms: subscribe, subscribe to.
33.
Buy, select.
34.
To get into a position of having, e.g., safety, comfort.
35.
Have sex with; archaic use.  Synonym: have.
36.
Lay claim to; as of an idea.  Synonym: claim.
37.
Be designed to hold or take.  Synonym: accept.
38.
Be capable of holding or containing.  Synonyms: contain, hold.  "The flask holds one gallon"
39.
Develop a habit.
40.
Proceed along in a vehicle.  Synonym: drive.
41.
Obtain by winning.  "He took first prize"
42.
Be stricken by an illness, fall victim to an illness.  Synonyms: contract, get.  "She came down with pneumonia" , "She took a chill"



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"Take" Quotes from Famous Books



... self-reproach. He had had more than enough of sadness in his life. For an idea, a stupid convention of other folks' manufacture, and not worth respecting, he should have no more. He should not be allowed to take his own path, to push her ...
— A Sheaf of Corn • Mary E. Mann

... shrug turned sharply towards the door. "I take it that you wouldn't object to knowing all the messenger can ...
— The Chief Legatee • Anna Katharine Green

... course to take, he went to Turkey, and in order to succeed there, had himself circumcised, put on the turban, and entered into the militia. His blasphemy advanced him, his talents and his colour distinguished him; he became Bacha, and the confidential man in the Morea, where the Turks were ...
— The Memoirs of Louis XIV., His Court and The Regency, Complete • Duc de Saint-Simon

... offence. Breckon did not know whether he was suffering more or less because he was suffering quite hopelessly, but he was sure that he was suffering justly, and he was rather glad, if anything, that he must go on suffering. His first impulse had been to go at once to Judge Kenton and own his wrong, and take the consequences—in fact, invite them. But Breckon forbore for two reasons: one, that he had already appeared before the judge with the confession of having possibly made an unclerical joke to his younger daughter; the other, that the judge might not consider levity towards the elder so venial; ...
— Henry James, Jr. • William Dean Howells

... fault if he had not already dined, whereas it was our misfortune, rather than our fault, that we had not tasted anything since three o'clock in the morning, so that when one of our men knocked the neck off a bottle, and handed it to me, to take a drink, I nodded to the old fellow's health, and drank it off without the smallest scruple of conscience. It was excellent claret, and if he still lives to tell the story, I fear he will not give us the credit of having belonged to such a civil ...
— Adventures in the Rifle Brigade, in the Peninsula, France, and the Netherlands - from 1809 to 1815 • Captain J. Kincaid

... you know what you are doing? Have you the feelings of a man, or of a mad dog? Which is it that it is, that you should be worrying the life out of this croupy infant of liberty, as is hardly able to waggle its head, barring all hope that it will ever get upon its pins and take its 'constitutional' like other mortals in distress? Where is the ghost of MIRABEAU, that it does not come upon you all of a sudden, to confiscate the very marrow in your bones and set up a candle factory in spite of the tax on tallow? ...
— Punchinello, Vol. II., No. 35, November 26, 1870 • Various

... prisoners, that the people would have dispersed, if the soldiers had not come down: It was then unfortunate, that the soldiers were so suddenly order'd down. Whether it was regular, for a captain to take a corporal's command, or was ever done before in the army, I leave others to say, who are better acquainted with the art military, than I pretend to be: If not, it may be difficult to account for Capt. Preston's great readiness to ...
— The Writings of Samuel Adams, volume II (1770 - 1773) - collected and edited by Harry Alonso Cushing • Samuel Adams

... who participated in the affair, commanding detachments on board of the "Philo Parsons." Part of the men, amounting in all to about seventy-five, were to go from Canada to Sandusky city by rail, another party were to cross the river at Detroit early on Monday morning, and take passage on the steamer "Philo Parsons" for Sandusky, another portion were to take passage on her from Sandwich, Canada, about two miles below Detroit, and still another party of them, consisting of about fifteen (with eight or ...
— The Great North-Western Conspiracy In All Its Startling Details • I. Windslow Ayer

... much damaged, Madeline," said her mother, with a smile. "He is made of very hard sugar—is your Candy Rabbit. It would take more of a soaking than he got to melt him. What were you doing with him in ...
— The Story of a Candy Rabbit • Laura Lee Hope

... be inferred, from the fact of their father having issued the orders; but it was necessary for the young expeditionists to set out with caution: else might they take a wrong route, and be altogether unable to fulfil his injunctions. They must not twice cross the same meridian. It was this quaint condition that puzzled them, and rendered it necessary to guard against making a ...
— Bruin - The Grand Bear Hunt • Mayne Reid

... carelessness and irregularity; he caught a fever by riding in the rain, of which he died delirious on the third day. I buried him without any of the heir's affected grief or secret exultation; then preparing to take a legal possession of his fortune, I opened his closet, where I found a will, made at his first arrival, by which my father was appointed the chief inheritor, and nothing was left me but a legacy sufficient to support me in the ...
— The Works of Samuel Johnson, LL.D, In Nine Volumes - Volume the Third: The Rambler, Vol. II • Samuel Johnson

... fashion, the rattling of accursed carts, and all the spirit-grieving sounds of brawling commerce, were unknown in the settlement of New Amsterdam. The grass grew quietly in the highways—the bleating sheep and frolicksome calves sported about the verdant ridge, where now the Broadway loungers take their morning stroll—the cunning fox or ravenous wolf skulked in the woods, where now are to be seen the dens of Gomez and his righteous fraternity of money-brokers—and flocks of vociferous geese cackled about the fields, where now the great Tammany wigwam and the patriotic tavern of Martling ...
— Knickerbocker's History of New York, Complete • Washington Irving

... children will soon pull that down. She'd make an excellent wife for such a man as you; and to tell you the truth, Charley, if you'll take my advice, you'll lose no time in making up to her. She has got that d—— French fellow at her heels, and though I don't suppose she cares one straw about him, it may ...
— The Three Clerks • Anthony Trollope

... beautiful an illustration of confession's blessings it furnished. Frequently we were alone, but he never referred again to that memorable evening, even by implication. At first I dreaded to have the door close upon us, feeling that he must perforce seek to take up the thread where he had broken it then. But he talked of other things, and so easily and naturally that I felt embarrassed. For weeks I could not shake off the feeling that, at our next talk, he would broach the subject. ...
— Short Story Classics (American) Vol. 2 • Various

... the village against her became so intensified that it was resolved by the people, pending the decision on the complaint that had been lodged, to take the law into their hands so far as to fasten ...
— Gipsy Life - being an account of our Gipsies and their children • George Smith

... legs by way of experiment, in addition to the art of angling,—the cruelest, the coldest, and the stupidest of pretended sports. They may talk about the beauties of nature, but the angler merely thinks of his dish of fish; he has no leisure to take his eyes from off the streams, and a single bite is worth to him more than all the scenery around. Besides, some fish bite best on a rainy day. The whale, the shark, and the tunny fishery have somewhat of noble and perilous ...
— The Works of Lord Byron, Volume 6 • Lord Byron

... eleven o'clock I arrived at the inn at Berne, where Le Duc had preceded me by two hours. In the first place, knowing the habits of Swiss innkeepers, I made an agreement with the landlord; and I then told the servant I had kept, who came from Berne, to take care of Le Duc, to put him under good medical superintendence, and to bid the doctor spare ...
— The Memoires of Casanova, Complete • Jacques Casanova de Seingalt

... NAPPING. To take any one napping; i.e. to come upon him unexpectedly, to find him asleep: as, He caught him napping, as ...
— 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue • Captain Grose et al.

... blood. Latin patriotism is ardent like man's one great love for woman, ennobling the giver as well as the loved one; it is tender like the son's love for the mother, with the sanctity of acknowledgment of the debt of life. Can any vision of "internationalism" take the place of these powerful personal loyalties to racial ideals?... "Mere boys led to the slaughter" is the sentimentality one hears of the marching conscripts of European armies. Better even so than the curse of no supreme allegiance, or devotion, or readiness to ...
— The World Decision • Robert Herrick

... after her own fashion, and possessed herself of its secrets. She had in fancy made voyages in it to foreign lands, had heard the accents of a softer tongue on its decks, and on summer nights, from the roof of the quarter-deck, had seen mellower constellations take the place of the hard metallic glitter of the Californian skies. Sometimes, in her isolation, the long, cylindrical vault she inhabited seemed, like some vast sea-shell, to become musical with the murmurings of the distant ...
— Frontier Stories • Bret Harte

... the test the utility of these elements of observation and indication, let us take a few instances.—If, in any individual, locomotive symmetry of figure is combined with direct and linear gait, a character of mind and countenance not absolutely repulsive, but cold and insipid, is indicated. If vital softness of figure is combined, with a gentle ...
— Sketches of the Fair Sex, in All Parts of the World • Anonymous

... "Yes, and I'll take your fool head off the first time I meet you!" the man returned. He let himself back into the barber's waiting hands, a growl deep in him, surly as an old dog that has been roused out of his place in the middle of ...
— The Duke Of Chimney Butte • G. W. Ogden

... being more foreign of manners and appearance than usual, Lady Hannah would call for her boots, attire herself as for a promenade outdoors, lift the corner of a blind, steal a glance at the seething, stenching single street of Tweipans between the slats of the green shutters, and—unpin her veil and take off her hat without ...
— The Dop Doctor • Clotilde Inez Mary Graves

... the coffee, she made it a trifle strong and boiled the milk that should temper without cooling it. The biscuits rose like her own spirits, the omelet speedily began to take on color like her own flushed face as she busied herself ...
— He Fell in Love with His Wife • Edward P. Roe

... knew no bounds, and he wished his secretaries and their wives to help him. But the Cabinet ladies would not visit or receive Mrs. Eaton, and their husbands refused to interfere. Calhoun, the Vice-President, also declined to take up Mrs. Eaton's cause. Mr. Van Buren, a widower, showed the lady ...
— Andrew Jackson • William Garrott Brown

... Tenancy. He could not originate the Sale of any Part of it, nor could they complete the sale without his Confirmation. Will it not be her Policy to keep Possession of that part of our Territory till Terms of Peace are proposd, that she may take occasion to say she is in Possession of her own. And will it not then be somewhat difficult for Mediator to find Arguments against her holding it? Should not Congress assist us in endeavoring to recover possession? We want Ships. If a french Squadron should again visit these Seas it is natural ...
— The Original Writings of Samuel Adams, Volume 4 • Samuel Adams

... lost his appetite and grew cross and peevish, so that no one dared come near him. So matters went from bad to worse, until once more Old Mother Nature visited the Green Forest to see how things were. Very humbly Old King Bear went down on his knees and begged her to take away his tail. At first Old Mother Nature refused, but he begged so hard and promised so faithfully never again to be discontented, that finally she relented and took away his tail, all but just a wee little bit. That she left as a ...
— Mother West Wind 'Why' Stories • Thornton W. Burgess

... Sparks, new-wounded, makes; to what fantastick Fooleries he has Recourse: The Glass is every Moment call'd to counsel, the Valet consulted and plagu'd for new Invention of Dress, the Footman and Scrutore perpetually employ'd; Billet-doux and Madrigals take up all his Mornings, till Play-time in dressing, till Night in gazing; still, like a Sun-flower, turn'd towards the Beams of the fair Eyes of his Caelia, adjusting himself in the most amorous Posture he can assume, his Hat under his Arm, while the other ...
— The Works of Aphra Behn - Volume V • Aphra Behn

... in Mulvaney, 'ye'd no chanst against the maraudin' psalm- singer. They'll take the airs an' the graces instid av the man nine times out av ten, an' they only find the blunder ...
— Life's Handicap • Rudyard Kipling

... moment that he receives the bag, he runs across toward Number One in the opposite rank, making a running toss as he does so. At the same time the entire line from Nine to Fifteen moves up one place to make room for Number Eight, who should take his place at the foot of the line next to Number Nine. As soon as Number One receives the bag, he passes it down the line to his neighbor, Number Two, and so on till it reaches the end of the line, which at the same time should be moving down one place to make room for ...
— Games for the Playground, Home, School and Gymnasium • Jessie H. Bancroft

... Mrs. Hannay said. "Naturally I should wish to have my children with me, but I doubt whether your being here would be for the happiness of any of us, and besides, I do not wish your uncle's money to go out of the family; he might take it into his head to leave it to a hospital for black women. Still, it would have been only right and proper that he should at any rate have given Helena the first choice. As for your instant acceptance of his offer, without even consulting ...
— Rujub, the Juggler • G. A. Henty

... said, "but in that 'really' lies the crux of the matter. Take, for instance, a simple fact of our own experience—pain. Would you say, perhaps, that ...
— The Meaning of Good—A Dialogue • G. Lowes Dickinson

... Colonel Brownlow, nothing can be handsomer than your conduct and Mrs. Brownlow's," said the old man; "but I should not like to take advantage of what she is good enough to say on the spur of the moment, till she has had more time to ...
— Magnum Bonum • Charlotte M. Yonge

... had said nothing of the sort, admitted that the Welcomes were in financial straits. "Their mother has to take in washing," he said, "and both the girls work. It's too bad, for they ought to ...
— Little Lost Sister • Virginia Brooks

... Bobby, lying flat on his back, with his hands clasped under his head (we all laugh)—"when I marry, no one shall succeed in packing me off to foreign parts, with my young woman. I shall take her straight home, as if I was not ashamed of her, and we will have a dance, and make a clean sweep of ...
— Nancy - A Novel • Rhoda Broughton

... very clear. I know the people I live among don't know everything. I grant you all that. But Woman Free! Woman Free! Madame Mafflu wants to know what liberty—or what liberties—singular or plural; do you take me?—ha! ha! There might ...
— Woman on Her Own, False Gods & The Red Robe - Three Plays By Brieux • Eugene Brieux

... victories and dominions, they say, if he did not favor us and approve our religion. This same reasoning blinds also the papist. Occupying an exalted position, they maintain they are the Church and hence they have no fear of divine punishment. Devilish, therefore, is that argument whereby men take the name of God to palliate ...
— Commentary on Genesis, Vol. II - Luther on Sin and the Flood • Martin Luther

... the least of his race. His little foots would have gone into the silver slipper. I take him to have been a Chinese and ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 14, No. 85, November, 1864 • Various

... treated as such. You have your choice. You can't tell me anything about Holcroft; I've known him since he was a boy. He doesn't want your girl. She ran away to him, didn't you?" to Jane, who nodded. "But he's willing to take her, to teach her something and give her a chance. His motive is pure kindness, and he ...
— He Fell in Love with His Wife • Edward P. Roe

... differs very widely from that civilized kind of dancing—finding its extreme type in the ballet—in which energy is concentrated into the muscles below the knee. In the finest kinds of primitive dancing all the limbs, the whole body, take part. For instance, "the Marquisan girls," Herman Melville remarked in Typee, "dance all over, as it were; not only do their feet dance, but their arms, hands, fingers,—ay, their very eyes seem to dance in their heads. In good sooth, they so sway their ...
— Studies in the Psychology of Sex, Volume 3 (of 6) • Havelock Ellis

... more. He would bid adieu to all that folly, and his life should not be a whit the emptier for the loss. He would fill it with interests—all kinds of interests, and his music should be the first. He would take up again, and carry out to the end, that oratorio which he had turned over in his mind for years—the "Absalom." He had several numbers at his fingers' ends; he would work out the bass solo, "Oh, Absalom, my son, my son!" and the double chorus that followed it, "Make ready, ...
— The Nebuly Coat • John Meade Falkner

... and explicit. You see, Peterkin, that I'm fairly installed; so you and I will take a short walk together, and hold a consultation as to our plans in the approaching campaign, while Ralph arranges our ...
— The Gorilla Hunters • R.M. Ballantyne

... on ruthless competition. The great majority who are unable to survive the test pay the price. And the community also pays the price, the state and nation pay it. And we have this misery on our consciences. I've no doubt you could show me some who have grown rich, but if you would let me I could take you to families in desperate want, living in rooms too dark to read in at midday in clear weather, where the husband doesn't get more than seven dollars a week when the mills are running full time, where the woman has to look out for the children and work for the ...
— The Crossing • Winston Churchill

... censorship one very good act of his is recorded, that, whereas the wars had made many widows, he obliged such as had no wives, some by fair persuasion, others by threatening to set fines on their heads, to take them in marriage; another necessary one, in causing orphans to be rated, who before were exempted from taxes, the frequent wars requiring more than ordinary expenses to maintain them. What, however, pressed them most was the siege of Veii. Some call this people Veientani. This ...
— Plutarch's Lives • A.H. Clough

... lazily, breathing themselves deeply in the damp, spring air. One hoarser note than the others struck familiarly on the nurse's ear. That was the voice of the engine on the ten-thirty through express, which was waiting to take its train to the east. She knew that engine's throb, for it was the engine that stood in the yards every evening while she made her first rounds for the night. It was the one which took her train round the southern ...
— The Web of Life • Robert Herrick

... that Robert should sleep first and the Onondaga gave his faithful promise to awaken him in four hours. The two lads meant to take the burden of the watch upon themselves, and, unless Willet awoke, of his own accord, he was to lie there ...
— The Rulers of the Lakes - A Story of George and Champlain • Joseph A. Altsheler

... "I'd take after it with a good thick stick," was the ready reply. "That is, always supposing that one ...
— The Border Boys Across the Frontier • Fremont B. Deering

... only write a word, which will be forwarded to you with a large package. We are guarded like criminals, and this restraint is truly dreadfully hard to bear!— constantly too apprehensive for one another, not to be able to approach the window without being loaded with insults; not to be able to take the poor children out into the air without exposing the dear innocents to reproaches, what a situation is ours, my dear heart! And when you think that I suffer not for myself alone, but have to tremble for the king as well, and for our friends who are with us, you ...
— Marie Antoinette And Her Son • Louise Muhlbach

... case, moreover, there is even a stronger necessity for such a vindication. By an express provision of the Constitution, before the President of the United States can enter on the execution of his office he is required to take an oath or ...
— A Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents - Section 1 (of 2) of Volume 3: Andrew Jackson (Second Term) • James D. Richardson

... as he would have done, had it been a rock or flower; he did not offer to take it,—still ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 10, No. 62, December, 1862 • Various

... commentator takes the words kimivottaram bhavet to imply what will be better for me? Shall I adhere to Vadanya's daughter or shall I take this girl? I think ...
— The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 4 • Kisari Mohan Ganguli

... pause she said, with a just perceptible chill in her voice: "May asked you to take care ...
— The Age of Innocence • Edith Wharton

... her look. Michel Menko was advancing to salute Marsa Laszlo, and take with affectionate respect the hand ...
— Serge Panine • Georges Ohnet

... as respects the famous Boston "tea-party," and taxation without representation. Great Britain then affirmed this right in the case of colonies and dependencies. Taught by the lesson of our War of Independence, she has since abandoned it. We now take it up, and are to-day, as one of the new obligations towards the heathen imposed upon us by Providence, formulating systems of imposts and tariffs for our new dependencies, wholly distinct from our own, and directly inhibited by our constitution, in regard to which systems those dependencies have ...
— "Imperialism" and "The Tracks of Our Forefathers" • Charles Francis Adams

... looks on me from thy mournful eye; The beauty of our free and vernal days; Our communings with sea, and hill, and sky— O, take that bright world from my spirit-gaze. Thou ...
— Home Pastimes; or Tableaux Vivants • James H. Head

... survive the fall of the hero she had loved, and with whose fortunes her own were mysteriously united. She died on the 28th, and her last hours were soothed by the presence of the Emperor Alexander, who promised to take her children under his protection. Of all the great monarchs of his age, he was the most extensively beloved and the most ...
— A Modern History, From the Time of Luther to the Fall of Napoleon - For the Use of Schools and Colleges • John Lord

... charges, and interest on his money at seven per cent., he had made by the transaction six thousand three hundred and seventy dollars. This sum, he thought, properly belonged to Mr. Dolph. And if Miss Dolph would take the counsel of an old friend of her father's, she would leave the sum in charge of the house of Abram Van Riper's Son. The house would invest it at ten per cent.—he stopped and looked at Edith, but she only answered him with innocent eyes of attention—and ...
— The Story of a New York House • Henry Cuyler Bunner

... dealings with Asiatics than to keep calm and cool, and I saw in a moment that, if we were ever to get out of our present scrape, it would be by maintaining a perfectly impassive demeanour in face of anything that might take place. Whether I acted my part well it is not for me to say, but the reader can satisfy himself on that point by perusing the Government inquiry and report made by Mr. J. Larkin, and given in the ...
— In the Forbidden Land • Arnold Henry Savage Landor

... hills behind Port Burdock is all that an old-fashioned, scarcely disturbed English country-side should be. In those days the bicycle was still rare and costly and the motor car had yet to come and stir up rural serenities. The Three Ps would take footpaths haphazard across fields, and plunge into unknown winding lanes between high hedges of honeysuckle and dogrose. Greatly daring, they would follow green bridle paths through primrose studded undergrowths, ...
— The History of Mr. Polly • H. G. Wells

... imaginable, "anything but that. You don't understand. If you knew all the circumstances, if you knew just how and why we parted you wouldn't ask me. I'm sorry for it all now, more sorry than you could believe, but you can't expect me to take up things just where they left off—as ...
— The Lost Valley • J. M. Walsh

... behalf of Sir Henry Taylor, Reeve had been conducting a negotiation with Longmans for the publication of Taylor's Autobiography, and an agreement had been come to which was to take effect after Taylor's death. ...
— Memoirs of the Life and Correspondence of Henry Reeve, C.B., D.C.L. - In Two Volumes. VOL. II. • John Knox Laughton

... Ascanius, that he may come to the palace, bringing with him gifts of such things as they saved from the ruins of Troy. Him will I cause to fall into a deep sleep and hide in Cythera or Idalium, and do thou for one night take upon thee his likeness. And when Queen Dido at the feast shall hold thee in her lap, and kiss and embrace thee, do thou breathe by stealth ...
— The Children's Hour, Volume 3 (of 10) • Various

... Africa Company had been started he seemed to have become half torpid and at the same time dogmatic. The simplicity which had distinguished him up to the end of his visit of 1889 seemed to have disappeared when he came back in 1891; and his avowed intention of ultimately coming to England to take part in English politics seemed also a strange mistake, as he was essentially a man fitted for colonial life, and had none of the knowledge, or the mode of concealing want of knowledge, one or other of which is required for ...
— The Life of the Rt. Hon. Sir Charles W. Dilke, Vol. 2 • Stephen Gwynn

... them—and these seemed to be endowed with a special modicum of patriotism—even attended the party primaries in which candidates were named. The majority went to the polls and cast their vote on election day, if it did not rain or snow. For a young man of Roosevelt's position to desire to take up politics seemed to his friends almost comic. Politics were low and corrupt; politics were not for "gentlemen"; they were the business and pastime of liquor-dealers, and of the degenerates and loafers who frequented the ...
— Theodore Roosevelt; An Intimate Biography, • William Roscoe Thayer

... intend to visit these settlements this fall, and push on towards the Rocky Mountains. It will take me to the end of the season to accomplish this, so that our real voyage of discovery will not begin until the following spring. Now, there is a certain locality beyond our most distant outpost, which I shall describe to you afterwards, ...
— The Pioneers • R.M. Ballantyne

... he left. "There's no room here for me now that you lads are marryin' all my girls. I'm goin' to hit the trail. It's Texas for me. I've got a letter in my pocket offerin' me a job as a Ranger an' I'm goin' to take it." ...
— A Man Four-Square • William MacLeod Raine

... later has its parallels among the savage Bushmen and Australians. It is highly improbable that men in an age so civilised as that of Homer invented myths as hideous as those of the lowest savages. But if we take these myths to be, not new inventions, but the sacred stories of local priesthoods, their antiquity is probably incalculable. The sacred stories, as we know from Pausanias, Herodotus and from all the writers who touch on the subject of the mysteries, were myths communicated ...
— Myth, Ritual, and Religion, Vol. 1 • Andrew Lang

... his heel in harder. Chantry all but told him to take his feet down, but stopped himself just ...
— The Best Short Stories of 1917 - and the Yearbook of the American Short Story • Various

... gods love die young' and whom they hate die old, but whom they honour, these they take up to their eternal habitations in the ...
— Pot-Boilers • Clive Bell

... never use this same so-often-mentioned sum of money, and that restitution of it must be made to you. These two, the loving member and the slow, for the sake of the right and of their father's memory, will have it ready for you to-morrow. Take it, and ease their minds and mine, and end ...
— A Message from the Sea • Charles Dickens

... has her new dress, Jean-Marie is the proud possessor of a fashionable kepi. Besides, we had a glass of Hermitage last night; the glow still suffuses my memory. I was growing positively niggardly with that Hermitage, positively niggardly. Let me take the hint: we had one bottle to celebrate the appearance of our visionary fortune; let us have a second to console us for its occultation. The third I hereby ...
— The Merry Men - and Other Tales and Fables • Robert Louis Stevenson

... "Take a spoonful of this," said May, holding some brandy to his lips. He drank it, and cast a long, earnest, loving look on her, drew her face towards his, and ...
— May Brooke • Anna H. Dorsey

... consider which is the greater, preeminence of state or of office; and here, seemingly, we should take note of two things, goodness and difficulty. Accordingly, if we make the comparison with a view to goodness, the religious state surpasses the office of parish priest or archdeacon, because a religious pledges ...
— Summa Theologica, Part II-II (Secunda Secundae) • Thomas Aquinas

... upon him. Only he had shown such foul contempt of Aubyn Auberley, proceeding to extremes of ill-behaviour toward his raiment, that for months young Frida had been forced to keep him chained, and take ...
— Frida, or, The Lover's Leap, A Legend Of The West Country - From "Slain By The Doones" By R. D. Blackmore • R. D. Blackmore

... was reading these figures Paul heard a reporter say, loudly, "Now that I have written the paper, who will take it?" ...
— Laughing Bill Hyde and Other Stories • Rex Beach

... have a school, and about sixteen scholars. If it were not for school I should be very lonesome, as I have only one playmate. There are plenty of children here, but they are all too small to play with. I take Young People, and it is a great addition to ...
— Harper's Young People, January 27, 1880 - An Illustrated Weekly • Various

... whithersoever he should lead the way. Accordingly, he appointed the next day for his march; and, after offering up vows, and making supplications to the gods for the safety of his troops, he dismissed them; desiring, at the same time, that they would take the ...
— The Ancient History of the Egyptians, Carthaginians, Assyrians, • Charles Rollin

... episcopal palace, near the ancient Puerta del Postigo, the execution of the three condemned men was about to take place, and crowds of people assembled to witness it. At the critical moment an assessor of the Supreme Court shouted to the Gov.-General that to take the life of the loyal defender of the fort, solely on the ground of his relationship to the rebel leader, would be an iniquity. His ...
— The Philippine Islands • John Foreman

... on Fort Malden near the present Amherstburg. From this point, Hull issued a proclamation, promising protection to the inhabitants who would remain at home and death to all who should side with the Indians, then gathering under Tecumseh at Malden. General Proctor was sent to take command at Fort Malden, while Brock began to assemble a force about him at Fort George. Here he was joined by John Brant, son of the great Mohawk chief with one ...
— Sustained honor - The Age of Liberty Established • John R. Musick,

... marshes of Assyria, and which suddenly terminated his life in the thirty-third year of his age, and the thirteenth of his reign (323 B.C.). He was buried in Babylon. From the Latin poet LUCAN we take the following ...
— Mosaics of Grecian History • Marcius Willson and Robert Pierpont Willson

... scarce a lad of twenty, for half-a-dozen miles round, that I had not beat for one cause or other. There were the vicar's two sons of Castle Brady—in course I could not associate with such beggarly brats as them, and many a battle did we have as to who should take the wall in Brady's Town; there was Pat Lurgan, the blacksmith's son, who had the better of me four times before we came to the crowning fight, when I overcame him; and I could mention a score more of my deeds of prowess in that way, but that fisticuff facts ...
— Barry Lyndon • William Makepeace Thackeray

... tongue draws back for very dread, Unhappy youth, from what it must not hide. The saddest tale that ever lips have said; Yet thou must know how sweet Leonora died, A broken martyr for love's weary sake, And left this gift for thee to leave or take." ...
— Among the Millet and Other Poems • Archibald Lampman

... from the popular point of view. After studying in this spirit the foundation of psychotherapy, we shall carefully examine the practical work, its methods and its results, its possibilities and its limitations. We shall inquire finally into the place which it has to take, looking back upon its history, criticising the present status and outlining the development which has to set in for the future, if a haphazard zigzag movement is not to destroy this great agency for human welfare by transforming it into a source ...
— Psychotherapy • Hugo Muensterberg

... hampered his powers; and he is not that rarity, an original writer, but that very common person, one who tries to be original. Real ladies and gentlemen are not reduced to the alternative of either being embarrassed by the ordinary social rules or disregarding them altogether; they take advantage of them. It is a false originality that is singular about ordinary forms; it is only the tyro in chess who is "original" in his first move; Paul Morphy, the most inventive of players, always begins with the customary ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Volume 7, Issue 41, March, 1861 • Various

... leave him at present. Your brother is there too." He paused a moment. "Your brother is a wonderful man," he said, with the air of a man bestowing praise against his will. "If you will be good enough to order some refreshment I will take it in. On no account is Mr. Errol's servant to ...
— The Knave of Diamonds • Ethel May Dell

... through a country covered with scrub timber. Here we constantly met many carts heavily loaded; the road was narrow, and several times collisions, due to the falling asleep of one or other of the carreteros, were narrowly escaped. Finally, one really did take place, between our second cart and a heavily loaded one going in the other direction. The axle of our cart was broken, and the vehicle totally disabled. Two hours and a quarter were consumed in making repairs and in ...
— In Indian Mexico (1908) • Frederick Starr

... the experiments in which the open spaces were presented first, I wish to offer an explanation for the divergent tendencies that were exhibited through all the experiments of the last two sections, namely, that the short filled spaces are overestimated and the long spaces underestimated. Let us take two typical judgments, one in which a filled space of 3 cm. is judged equal to an open space of 4.2 cm., and then one in which the filled space is 9 cm., and is judged equal to an open space of 7.4 cm. In the case of the shorter ...
— Harvard Psychological Studies, Volume 1 • Various

... had only to put on a clean collar, now his watch—it certainly was morning—now to pack, go down and pay the bill, have something to eat, take his ticket, send the telegram; but first— no, it must all be done together, for the train WAS there; it had only a few minutes more to wait; he could only just catch it. The telegram was given to some ...
— Absalom's Hair • Bjornstjerne Bjornson

... wiping his mouth with a huge, red cotton pocket-handkerchief. "You get along as fast as ever you can, an' if the young shavers isn't at Firgrove afore you, send somebody up wi' a message. Then me an' Tom Brook 'll take a look round; an' if they're anywhere inside Copsley Wood, we'll bring them home to you afore bedtime ...
— Two Little Travellers - A Story for Girls • Frances Browne Arthur

... little brute, you! To up and try an' murder my young man. With your jor about spies! Sauce! I'd perish you, I would, if I was 'im! Off the fyce o' the earth, an' charnce bein' 'ung for it! Take away that gun, you silly ...
— The Dop Doctor • Clotilde Inez Mary Graves

... and Karaatari had not been so incautious as to take a wide circle of persons into their confidence. But they were immediately joined by practically all the nobility and high officials, and the o-omi's troops having dispersed without striking a blow, Emishi and his people ...
— A History of the Japanese People - From the Earliest Times to the End of the Meiji Era • Frank Brinkley and Dairoku Kikuchi

... often impressed me, and I have frequently quoted them when asked why I did not write an account of the interesting travels and adventures I have had in my life. It has therefore required a great deal of courage to take up my pen and record a few recollections of South Africa. I felt that, were they ever to be written at all, it must be before the rapidly passing years diminish the interest in that land, which in the past has been the object of such engrossing ...
— South African Memories - Social, Warlike & Sporting From Diaries Written At The Time • Lady Sarah Wilson

... the bystanders by an assurance that the wounds, which they re-examined, were not dangerous. Having laid their patient on the vehicle, they were preparing to retire with it into the rear, when Thaddeus petitioned the prince to grant him permission to take the command of the guard which was appointed to attend his grandfather. His highness consented; but Sobieski ...
— Thaddeus of Warsaw • Jane Porter

... but seldom. She was still faithful in her friendship for Christophe. But, like a true Italian, she was hardly at all sentimental, attached to reality, and needed to see people if she were, perhaps not to think of them, but certainly to take pleasure in talking to them. Her heart's memory needed to be supported by having her sight's memory refreshed from time to time. Her letters became brief and distant. She was as sure of Christophe as Christophe ...
— Jean-Christophe Journey's End • Romain Rolland

... go? No fine lady in need of a handmaid seemed to think a painted lady's child would suit; indeed, Grizel at first sight had not the manner that attracts philanthropists. Once only did the problem approach solution; a woman in the Den-head was willing to take the child because (she expressed it) as she had seven she might as well have eight, but her man said no, he would not have his bairns fil't. Others would have taken her cordially for a few weeks or months, had they not known that at the end of this time they would be blamed, even by themselves, ...
— Sentimental Tommy - The Story of His Boyhood • J. M. Barrie

... to that which Bill had to submit to himself. It terminated in a similar manner: that is, by their owner taking them under his protection,—not from any motives of humanity, but simply to save his property from receiving damage at the hands of the incarnate female furies, who seemed to take delight ...
— The Boy Slaves • Mayne Reid

... according to their own fashions. They can also weave a kind of striped stuff, either of cotton or the rinds of trees; but, owing to their indolence, very little of that is made or worn. The men for the most part wear their hair, which is very thick and curly, and in which they take great pride, and often go bare-headed to show their hair. The women go all bare-headed, many of them having their hair tucked up like a cart-horse, but the better sort tuck it up like our riding geldings. About their loins ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Vol. VIII. • Robert Kerr

... to Gen. xv. 18, the Exodus was to take place in the fourth generation born in Egypt, as I ...
— Supplemental Nights, Volume 6 • Richard F. Burton

... that I shall leave town for a month: my friend Monclar looks piteous when I talk of such an event. I can't bear to leave him; he is to take my portrait to-day (a famous one he has taken!) and very like he engages it shall be. I am going to town for ...
— Life and Letters of Robert Browning • Mrs. Sutherland Orr

... "We'll take Ticonderoga this time, Robert. Never fear," said Willet. "We'll advance with our artillery, and the French have no force there that can stop us. Amherst is building a fort that he calls Edward, but we'll never need it. He's very cautious, ...
— The Sun Of Quebec - A Story of a Great Crisis • Joseph A. Altsheler

... of the Wall-street office, for the hand of the young lady trusted to their hospitality—a very pretty candidate—a German tutor—who could sing. If he took her, it was to be feared he would have to take her without more dowry than some very heavy imprecations. But could he take her, even thus? Sophie had some very strange misgivings. This man was desperately unhappy: was suffering frightfully: it made her heart ache to see the ...
— Richard Vandermarck • Miriam Coles Harris

... Rivoli, and I found the streets and the garden with much fewer people in them than was usual at that hour. There I heard a rumour that a slight disturbance had taken place on the Boulevard des Italiens, in consequence of a refusal of the Duc de Fitzjames, a leading Carlist, to take off his hat to the body of Lamarque, as he stood at a balcony. I had often met M. de Fitzjames in society, and, although a decided friend of the old regime, I knew his tone of feeling and manners to be too good, to credit a tale so idle. By a singular coincidence, the only time I ...
— A Residence in France - With An Excursion Up The Rhine, And A Second Visit To Switzerland • J. Fenimore Cooper

... their complaints. He proposed that Alice should depart privately to a town many miles off; that there he would provide for her a carriage, and engage a servant; that he would do this for her as for a relation, and that she should take that relation's name. To this, Alice rapt in her child, and submissive to all that might be for the child's benefit, passively consented. It was arranged then as proposed, and under the name of Cameron, which, as at once a common yet ...
— Alice, or The Mysteries, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... among the Gauls had, however, noticed in the broken shrubs and loosened stones the marks of the daring act of the messenger who had climbed the hill, and determined to take the hint and enter the capitol in that way themselves. In the dead of night, but by the bright light of the moon we may suppose, since the battle of Allia was fought at the full of the moon, the daring barbarians began slowly and with great difficulty to climb the rocky ...
— The Story of Rome From the Earliest Times to the End of the Republic • Arthur Gilman

... such good hands. Then, after taking a long draught of water, he rose to his feet and followed Muley into the entrance hall. The latter stopped at a door on the opposite side, knocked at it, and then motioned to Gervaise to take off his slippers. The door was opened by the ...
— A Knight of the White Cross • G.A. Henty

... has broken his force into two, a fatal error, as we shall see, in view of the wide space of open ground between the farm and the church. He has 1 gun, 5 cavalry, and 13 infantry on his left, who are evidently to take up a strong position by the church and enfilade Blue's position; Red's right, of 2 guns, 20 cavalry, and 37 infantry aim at the seizure of ...
— Little Wars; a game for boys from twelve years of age to one hundred and fifty and for that more intelligent sort of girl who likes boys' games and books • H. G. Wells

... and howl with delight when a more cruel blow than common fells one on 'em to the earth. And then our newspapers fight it all over for the enjoyment of the family fireside, for the wimmen and children and invalids, mebby, that couldn't take in the rare treat at first sight. Every blow, every cruel bruise that wuz made in the suffering flesh reproduced for Sunday reading. And if one of the fighters is killed and his mangled body taken out of the fighting ring forever, taken home to his wife and children with the comfortin' peticulars ...
— Around the World with Josiah Allen's Wife • Marietta Holley

... subordinate units are in an equal position relatively to the federal authority. Is this Bill likely to be so framed that its provisions can be adapted unchanged to Scotland, Wales, or England? And if they could, what sort of a residuum of a United Kingdom government would be left over? Take finance alone: if every unit under "Home Rule all round" is to receive the whole product of its taxation, what becomes of the revenue on which the general government of the United Kingdom will have to subsist? The fact is that the creation of a federal state, whether by confederation or by ...
— Against Home Rule (1912) - The Case for the Union • Various

... his responsiveness. The contagion of the world's slow stain has not touched him; from the first he held aloof from the general conspiracy to forget in which not only those who are professional optimists take a part. Therefore his simplest words have a vehemence and ...
— Aspects of Literature • J. Middleton Murry

... is concerned to foster. We met in London by a fortunate chance whilst Sir John was about this business at the Court. Now it happens that I, too, have interests in Truro and Penryn; but, unlike Sir John, I am honest in the matter, and proclaim it. If any growth should take place about Smithick it follows from its more advantageous situation that Truro and Penryn must suffer, and that suits me as little as the other matter would suit Sir John. I told him so, for I can ...
— The Sea-Hawk • Raphael Sabatini

... nothing is more common than to see a delicate white hand journeying across an enormous double bass, or a pair of roseate cheeks puffing, with all their efforts, at a French horn. Some that are grown old and Amazonian, who have abandoned their fiddles and their lovers, take vigorously to the kettledrum; and one poor limping lady, who had been crossed in love, now makes an admirable figure ...
— Dreams, Waking Thoughts, and Incidents • William Beckford

... corner of Grand Street, or thereabouts, a "bhoy" in red flannel shirt and black dress pantaloons, leaning back against the crowd with Herculean shoulders, called me,—"Saaey, bully! take my dorg! he's one of the kind that holds till he draps." This gentleman, with his animal, was instantly shoved back by the police, and the Seventh lost ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 7, No. 44, June, 1861 • Various

... "your father's the one has to see you get into college or get a job. Sometimes schools do let kids take a lot of soft courses, and then they're ...
— It's like this, cat • Emily Neville

... the naked Cephalopods, which were in later times to become the prominent representatives of that class, already begin to make their appearance. Among Radiates, some of the higher kinds of Echinoderms, the Ophiurans and Echinolds, take the place of the Crinoids, and the Acalephian Corals give way to the Astraean and Meandrina-like types, resembling the Reef-Builders of the ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 12, August, 1863, No. 70 - A Magazine of Literature, Art, and Politics • Various

... free in the breeze. She had given herself up to the joy of the moment. I rejoiced in a feeling which I could not share; the rebound from the strain of the night left me sad and apprehensive. I sat down and rested my head on my hands, waiting till she came back. When she came, she would not take the food I offered her, but stood a moment, looking at me with puzzled eyes, before ...
— Simon Dale • Anthony Hope

... the shift from Bonn to Berlin will take place over a period of years, with Bonn retaining many administrative functions ...
— The 1996 CIA Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency.

... earthly! He'll come a mucker, though, some day, trying. He'd take any outside chance. For a clever man he's the ...
— The Pawns Count • E. Phillips Oppenheim

... all manner of torments with invincible courage, and 'tis a wonder to see with what alacrity they will undergo such tortures," ut supra naturam res videatur: he ascribes this generosity, fury, or rather stupidity, to this adustion of choler and melancholy: but I take these rather to be mad or desperate, than properly melancholy; for commonly this humour so adust and ...
— The Anatomy of Melancholy • Democritus Junior

... epicure, a covetous man, an ambitious man of his irregular course, wean him from it a little, pol me occidistis amici, he cries anon, you have undone him, and as [415]a "dog to his vomit," he returns to it again; no persuasion will take place, no counsel, ...
— The Anatomy of Melancholy • Democritus Junior



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