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Wild flower   /waɪld flˈaʊər/   Listen
Wild flower

noun
1.
Wild or uncultivated flowering plant.  Synonym: wildflower.






WordNet 3.0 © 2010 Princeton University








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"Wild flower" Quotes from Famous Books



... gauze and then dissolved in the clear air. These atmospherical changes intensified the colouring and brought out the varying tints of grey and purple rocks into a strange prominence, while every wild flower appeared to thrust itself suddenly into observation: the purple cistus seemed magnified to the size of roses, and a bright gleam of gold from the masses of prickly bloom now in fullest blaze mingled with the general green surface ...
— Cyprus, as I Saw it in 1879 • Sir Samuel W. Baker

... say so!" thought Thornton; "and as fresh as they make 'em! But she is pretty—yes, she is a genuine stunner! A sort of wild flower. She is so innocent ...
— Frank Merriwell's Races • Burt L. Standish

... She plucked the wild flower out by the roots. "It struggles—and struggles—and blooms for a day—and withers. What's the use?" she demanded, almost savagely. Then, before he could answer, the girl closed the door she had opened for him. "We must be moving. The sun has already ...
— The Sheriff's Son • William MacLeod Raine

... day informed her that the planets could be weighed and their distance from the earth and the sun measured. In the beginning she knew nothing—neither whether the earth was round or flat, nor what was the meaning of the stars, nor the name of one wild flower excepting daisies, nor of one great man. That fallow waste called her mind was virgin ground in truth, but Alick was patient, and labored hard at the stubborn soil; and when madame had given the credit to her own tact and those ugly little books from which she taught, it was to him really that ...
— Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science, Vol. 17, - No. 97, January, 1876 • Various

... at the idea of seeing the little nest and eggs, and Mrs. Frazer said, "There is a wild flower [Footnote: Noli me tangere, Canadian Balsam.] that is known to the Canadians by the name of the Humming-flower, on account of the fondness which those birds evince for it. This plant grows on the moist ...
— Lady Mary and her Nurse • Catharine Parr Traill

... ripen their seeds, little harassed even by the scythe and never by grazing cattle. So it happens that, extremes meeting, the wild flower, with its old-world associations, often grows most freely within a few feet of the wheels of the locomotive. Purple heathbells gleam from shrub-like bunches dotted along the slope; purple knapweeds lower down in the grass; ...
— Nature Near London • Richard Jefferies

... plunging headlong into a licentious career, and the recovery of his manhood again through divine intervention, suggest a serious symbolism. The beautiful episode of 'Cupid and Psyche,' which would lend salt to a production far more corrupt, is also suggestive. Apuleius perfected this wild flower of ancient folk-lore into a perennial plant that has blossomed ever since along the paths of literature and art. The story has been accepted as a fitting embodiment of the struggle of the soul toward a higher perfection; yet, strange to say, the episode is narrated with as brutal ...
— Library Of The World's Best Literature, Ancient And Modern, Vol. 2 • Charles Dudley Warner

... share their faults and follies, I pity their sorrows, and would do my utmost to succor or to soothe; but I do not understand them as I do the woods: their faces I readily forget, but never the forms of mountain crag, of noble tree, or of first spring wild flower. Among men I may be misunderstood, disliked perhaps, or, more generally, simply ignored and overlooked; but among the hills I fear no harsh, no indifferent word: each treasure of beauty breathes to me of One who knows my every heart-beat, One whom I can love without fear of wound ...
— Continental Monthly, Volume 5, Issue 4 • Various

... to-day is unlike the world in which "Chevy Chase" was first sung. These modern ballads are not necessarily better or worse than their predecessors; but they are necessarily different. It is idle to exalt the wild flower at the expense of the garden flower; each has its fragrance, its beauty, its sentiment; and ...
— The Book of Old English Ballads • George Wharton Edwards

... the forest fires have sped, Scorching relentlessly the cool north lands, A sweet wild flower lifts its purple head, And, like some gentle spirit sorrow-fed, It hides the scars with almost ...
— Flint and Feather • E. Pauline Johnson

... different. A gem of poetry is the scene in the sixth canto, full of witchery and charm, wherein the imagination of the little maid, wandering out along the water in the mysterious moonlight, causes her to fancy she sees the Drac in the form of a fair youth smiling upon her, offering her a wild flower, uttering sweet, mysterious words of love that die away in the water. She often came again to meet him; and she noticed that if ever she crossed herself on entering the water, as she had always done when a little girl, the Drac would not appear. These three or four pages mark the genuine poet ...
— Frederic Mistral - Poet and Leader in Provence • Charles Alfred Downer

... but not about the old house, for they could not remember it, so many years had passed. So many years had gone by that the little boy had grown up to a whole man. And he had just been married and had brought his wife to live in the house here, where the garden was. She had brought a wild flower with her that she found very pretty and he stood by her as she planted it in the garden and pressed the earth around it ...
— Tell Me Another Story - The Book of Story Programs • Carolyn Sherwin Bailey

... Lily of gorgeous hue originally came from China. Escaping from gardens here and there, it was first reported as a wild flower at East Rock, Connecticut; other groups of vagabonds were met marching along the roadsides on Long Island; near Suffern, New York; then farther southward and westward, until it has already attained a very respectable range. Every plant has some good device for sending its offspring ...
— Wild Flowers Worth Knowing • Neltje Blanchan et al

... order, and began to wish most enthusiastically for some romantic admirer; some one who would expose himself to the danger of a sore throat and influenza for the sake of serenading me—who would be rather glad than otherwise to risk his life by jumping down a precipice to bring me some descried wild flower, and who, when away from me, would pass his time in writing extravagant poetry, of which I was to be the bright divinity. Old as I am, I feel almost ashamed to repeat this nonsense now; and had I then possessed more sense myself, or made by mother the ...
— A Grandmother's Recollections • Ella Rodman

... interrupted. For I drew, then, very delicately; and should have made a pretty book if I could have got peace. Even yet, I can manage my point a little, and would far rather be making outlines of flowers, than writing; and I meant to have drawn every English and Scottish wild flower, like this cluster of bog heather opposite,[4]—back, and profile, and front. But 'Blackwood's {10} Magazine,' with its insults to Turner, dragged me into controversy; and I have not had, properly speaking, a day's peace ...
— Proserpina, Volume 1 - Studies Of Wayside Flowers • John Ruskin

... hath forgiven you in Christ." She wished that she too might go through the Garden of Good Intentions whilst flowers sprang up and birds sang sweetly round about her. But what could she do, what deed of kindness perform, however small, that might perhaps bloom as a wild flower by the wayside to gladden ...
— Peggy-Alone • Mary Agnes Byrne

... My heart has clothed itself with witty words, To shroud itself from curious eyes:—impelled At times to aim at a star, I stay my hand, And, fearing ridicule,—cull a wild flower! ...
— Cyrano de Bergerac • Edmond Rostand

... yards beyond the house Sally discovered old Jean, who was doubtless coming to find her, as he bore in his hand a French fleur-de-lis, the national wild flower, which he had found growing in a field as hardy and unconquerable as ...
— The Campfire Girls on the Field of Honor • Margaret Vandercook

... in a grain of sand, And a heaven in a wild flower; Hold infinity in the palm of your hand And Eternity in ...
— Prose Fancies (Second Series) • Richard Le Gallienne

... more than a child even now, only lately turned seventeen; and before Jack went away to sea—now two years and a month ago—I believe that most of the love-making between them had been conducted through the media of bon-bons and an occasional wild flower, though it ended with farewell tears, a lock of bonnie hair, and a miniature, both of which Jack had taken away with him, and, like a true lover, worn next his heart ever ...
— As We Sweep Through The Deep • Gordon Stables

... midnight sun is several degrees above the horizon, they droop their leaves, and sleep even as they do at sunset in more favoured climes." Look at the bright scarlet flower, with its small purple eye. Excepting poppies, with their dazzling brightness, I do not think there is another wild flower that has scarlet petals. However, the blossoms are not always scarlet; there is a white variety with a purple eye, and another having a dark ...
— Country Walks of a Naturalist with His Children • W. Houghton

... simple-hearted girl, whose father is a magnate among his neighbors in the Orkney Islands. Sheila is won by a Londoner—Lavender by name—who visits her island home. He transplants the Northern wild flower into a London home, where she pines for a while, homesick and heart-sick. In time, her sound sense enables her to adjust herself to altered conditions, and her stronger nature raises and ennobles her husband's.—William ...
— Character Sketches of Romance, Fiction and the Drama - A Revised American Edition of the Reader's Handbook, Vol. 3 • E. Cobham Brewer

... been produced in this way, by selecting and improving wild flowers. Of course all flowers grow wild somewhere; some in England, but many more in foreign countries, where the air is warmer and the soil richer and better. The Pansy is a little English wild flower with yellow, blue, and red petals. From this little flower gardeners have produced large and beautiful pansies of many different colours and shades of colours—white, yellow, blue, and brown. ...
— Wildflowers of the Farm • Arthur Owens Cooke

... aside, the finished work absorbs all thought and fills all imaginations. So vast is it, and on such a scale of magnitude, that one hardly saw before the delicacy and exquisite adjustment of parts, the marvellous art that framed the smallest leaf and touched the vagrant wild flower still blooming on the edges of the woodland. It is, after all, when the great festival days are over and the thronging crowds have gone, that the true worshipper finds the temple beautiful with the highest visions of worship, and in the silence of deserted aisles and shrines ...
— Under the Trees and Elsewhere • Hamilton Wright Mabie

... "Another wild flower of striking beauty is the May apple or mandrake. It comes very early in May, often in April. This plant grows to about the same height as the trillium. Only the big spreading leaves of the mandrake ...
— The Library of Work and Play: Gardening and Farming. • Ellen Eddy Shaw

... black hair forward over her unhatted face in a frame. Wayland looked at her and felt his masterdom going to those same winds; for the pace had painted her ivory cheeks, not rose color, but the deep flame of the wild flower. Some day, perhaps,—no matter; he set his teeth and screwed the whipcord muscles taut; for the moraine stones had begun to roll, and there was a zig-zag flash of lightning that sent fire balls sizzling over the rock. He braced her to the leap down the steep sliding moraine, and felt the ...
— The Freebooters of the Wilderness • Agnes C. Laut

... treat to the children to be fairly outside the town, among green fields and pleasant woods. Mrs. Lee had to keep her head bobbing this way and that way, to see a flock of turkeys that made Meg laugh; or a wild flower that pleased Hatty; or a "pretty moo cow" that Harry ...
— Hatty and Marcus - or, First Steps in the Better Path • Aunt Friendly

... clear, quick water, and fanciful patches of heath and wood-land. Here and there a secular oak tree maintained a solitude around it. It was the district of the "little river Loir"—the Vendomois; and here, in its own country, the new poetry, notwithstanding its classic elegance, might seem a native wild flower, modest enough. ...
— Gaston de Latour: an unfinished romance • Walter Horatio Pater

... contact with his masculinity, dangerous both in its primitive sense of something vast and rough, and also as something more experienced than her, seemed as iniquitous as the trampling of some fine white wild flower. But then, she was beautiful, not only lovely: destiny had marked her for a high career; to leave her as she was would be to miscast one who deserved to play the great tragic part, which cannot be played without the actress's heart beating at the prospect ...
— The Judge • Rebecca West

... walls and steps remain in front of the house and about the grounds, or will they be swept away with all the beautiful mosses and ferns and wild geraniums and other flowers which their rude construction suffered and encouraged to grow among them? This little wild flower, 'Poor Robin,' is here constantly courting my attention and exciting what may be called a domestic interest with the varying aspects of its stalks and leaves and flowers. Strangely do the tastes of men differ, according to their employment ...
— The Prose Works of William Wordsworth • William Wordsworth

... saw recently in such a situation, but of which he does not recollect the name, which has masses of wax-like, pale sulphur flowers, which are mirrored in a miniature pool set almost at its foot. This half-wild flower garden pertains mainly to the banks of the brook gully, and not to the banks of the brook itself. It is in the latter, by the waterside, that the special charm of these gardens should be found. It is the nature of such places to have a strip of level ground opposite ...
— The Naturalist on the Thames • C. J. Cornish

... silver birch, were to them a beauty and a mystery. The gradual change of brown fields to a living green, as the tender blades of the new-sown grain sprang up, was wondrous too. The tiny mosses on the rocks, the ferns hidden away from other eyes, were searched for and rejoiced over. No wild flower by the wayside, no bird or butterfly, no new development of life in any form, but won ...
— The Orphans of Glen Elder • Margaret Murray Robertson

... way thy reward must come. The long journey and the strange new life would kill thee, Wildenai." Having once begun he stumbled on, but half aware of how each word he uttered hurt her, eager only to have done with the whole sorry scene. "Thou art but a little wild flower. Thou couldst not live away from this, thy sunny island. Can'st thou not ...
— Their Mariposa Legend • Charlotte Herr

... anemoly—the wild flower, I mean?" asked Jill, who was trying to compose a very appropriate piece for her best basket, and found it easier to feel love and gratitude than to put them ...
— Jack and Jill • Louisa May Alcott

... rocks were moist and fresh coloured, grey and green and brown; the buds and young leafage of the trees were of every lovely hue and shade that young vegetation can take; and here and there Esther found a wild flower. When she found one, it was very apt to be taken up by the roots with her little trowel, and bestowed in her basket for careful transport home; and on the so endangered beauties in her basket Esther looked down from time to time with fond ...
— A Red Wallflower • Susan Warner



Words linked to "Wild flower" :   gay-feather, Parnassia fimbriata, meadow rue, button snakeroot, Arnica montana, prairie star, Tragopogon dubius, dwarf daisy, Hulsea nana, Penstemon cyananthus, maiden blue-eyed Mary, Penstemon davidsonii, hot-rock penstemon, Penstemon parryi, Penstemon deustus, tahoka daisy, Hymenoxys acaulis, Boykinia occidentalis, rock penstemon, purple chinese houses, Tiarella unifoliata, Encelia farinosa, Eustoma grandiflorum, flowering plant, angiosperm, Penstemon palmeri, fleabane, edelweiss, lowbush penstemon, fringed grass of Parnassus, Tetraneuris acaulis, Enceliopsis nudicaulis, woolly daisy, Ranunculus glaberrimus, cascade penstemon, white-rayed mule's ears, Tanacetum douglasii, Machaeranthera tanacetifolia, snow plant, incienso, Monotropa hypopithys, yellow salsify, blackfoot daisy, gaillardia, Collinsia bicolor, Tragopogon pratensis, Senecio triangularis, waxflower, Penstemon whippleanus, Lasthenia chrysostoma, leatherleaf saxifrage, Tetraneuris grandiflora, kitten-tails, goatsbeard, bluebell, painted cup, redmaids, pasqueflower, alpine gold, goldenrod, pussy-paw, Lithophragma parviflorum, north island edelweiss, Penstemon barbatus, Penstemon rupicola, Hulsea algida, hawk's-beard, Collinsia heterophylla, hawk's-beards, common tarweed, Penstemon linarioides, sand verbena, woolly sunflower, tulip gentian, siskiyou lewisia, pasque flower, fringe cups, hawkbit, Rydberg's penstemon, false alumroot, Lewisia rediviva, Heterotheca villosa, Arnica cordifolia, flame-flower, Whipple's penstemon, Platte River penstemon, arrowleaf groundsel, Mojave aster, blazing star, northern dune tansy, blue-eyed Mary, prairie gentian, Madia elegans, Melampodium leucanthum, engelmannia, hairy golden aster, nodding groundsel, goldfields, false beachdrops, Sarcodes sanguinea, Jones' penstemon, bitterroot, goldenbush, red maids, stemless golden weed, Penstemon centranthifolius, brittlebush, Penstemon newberryi, Lewisia cotyledon, false chamomile, brittle bush, pinesap, coneflower, shrubby penstemon, cliff penstemon, wild carrot, Queen Anne's lace, Indian pipe, Monotropa uniflora, Hymenoxys grandiflora, ragwort, narrow-leaf penstemon, Gerea canescens, false miterwort, false mitrewort, balloon flower, Collinsia verna, Davidson's penstemon, Senecio glabellus, mountain pride, flameflower, sticky aster, meadow salsify, Penstemon rydbergii, Tellima grandiflora, Penstemon serrulatus, innocense, Haplopappus acaulis, golden aster, Calandrinia ciliata, dwarf hulsea, heartleaf arnica, Boykinia elata, mule's ears, Eriophyllum wallacei, old man of the mountain, Leontopodium alpinum, Penstemon dolius, butterweed, Stenotus acaulis, flame flower, desert sunflower, Talinum aurantiacum, Chrysopsis villosa, pussy-paws, Leucogenes leontopodium, trailing windmills, common madia, scarlet bugler, Penstemon fruticosus, golden-beard penstemon, prairie golden aster, Spraguea umbellatum, Collinsia parviflora, Machaeranthera bigelovii, scented penstemon, shepherd's clock, stemless hymenoxys, Calyptridium umbellatum, Allionia incarnata, Machaeranthera tortifoloia, gayfeather, heliopsis, oxeye, Leptarrhena pyrolifolia, Wyethia helianthoides, Daucus carota, Parry's penstemon, Senecio bigelovii, Antheropeas wallacei, tansy leaf aster, Indian paintbrush, coast boykinia, sunray, sagebrush buttercup, Wyethia amplexicaulis, snakeroot, wildflower, pussy's-paw, trailing four o'clock, wilding, alpine sunflower, alpine hulsea



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